best fantasy books

Surprise! It’s NOT an ode to Queen. It’s another flaming list. 

 

I’ve said it a couple hundred times before and I’ll say it a couple thousand times more: I love a good list. But you know what I love even more than lists? Books. I can’t get enough of them. I could build a throne of all the books I own. I could crawl up into a fort made of books and lose myself in fiction for days. Have I made my book fetish clear yet? You get it, right? I love books and lists. I can stop banging on about it now. So, this month, I’ve brought the two together again because I clearly have too much time on my hands—and voila: another book list. Specifically, the BEST books, and not just any books but the best fantasy books.

 

Ode to Fantasy

 

Now, I could no sooner choose a favourite genre or book than I could choose between Ian Somerhalder, Johnny Depp, and [insert your favourite eye candy here]. I want them all—all the men; all the books. That being said, there’s something special about Fantasy. To sum up what would otherwise be a very long and (for you) laborious declaration of love, I think Brandon Sanderson said it best: fantasy is all of that good stuff (romance, action, drama, etc, etc,) only WITH DRAGONS!

I am OBVIOUSLY paraphrasing here. Mr Sanderson is a damn sight more eloquent than this. But that’s the gist of it. Fantasy hits all the spots, checks all the boxes… I can’t think of a third… So…

 

On to the List!

 

Here are ten of the best fantasy books (probably OF ALL TIME), and because everyone and their pet crocodile has heard of the best fantasy books a bazillion times already, I won’t summarise any of these but I AM adding five of my personal favourites. (See my additions at the bottom.)

 

1. The Fellowship of the Ring (Lord of the Rings) by J R Tolkien

2. A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire) George R R Martin

3. Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (Harry Potter) by J K Rowling

4. The Eye of the World (The Wheel of Time) by Robert Jordan

5. The Name of the Wind (The Kingkiller Chronicle) by Patrick Rothfuss

6. A Wizard of Earthsea (Earthsea Cycle) by Ursula K. Le Guin

7. Assassin’s Apprentice (Farseer Trilogy) by Robin Hobb

8. Northern Lights (His Dark Materials) by Philip Pullman

9. The Final Empire (Mistborn) by Brandon Sanderson

10. The Colour of Magic (Discworld) by Terry Pratchett

 

Five of my Personal Favourites

 

uprooted

1. Uprooted by Naomi Novik

A loose retelling of Beauty and the Beast but with intriguing mythology and a beautifully vivid nature-based magic system. It follows a girl who is yet to learn who and what she is until she meets the Dragon.

See full review:
Uprooted

discovery of witches

2. A Discovery of Witches (All Souls Trilogy) by Deborah Harkness

A witch who doesn’t want her magic and a vampire older than the hills, time-travel through history to uncover the mystery behind a mysterious tome. This is rich with history and intrigue and is one of my favourite witchy books.

See full review:
A Discovery of Witches

shadow and bone

3. Shadow and Bone (The Grisha Trilogy) by Leigh Bardugo

Original storytelling with Russian elements, the Grisha Trilogy is rich with detail and depth. The fleshed out world is refreshingly unique in both setting and story, and is centred on an orphan girl who is thrust into power and magic.

See full reviews:
Book One: Shadow and Bone
Book Two: Siege and Storm
Book Three: Ruin and Rising

Witch Child

4. Witch Child by Celia Rees

A wonderful weaving of fiction and fact, set around the Salem Witch Trials and centred on a girl called Mary as she discovers who she really is and how to survive in her threatening world. Immersive and bewitching and unputdownable.

See full review:
Book One: Witch Child 

once burned

5. Once Burned (Night Prince) by Jeaniene Frost

Technically an action-packed paranormal series with witty, kick-ass vampires but with enough magic (particularly in the fourth book) to pass as fantasy. Easily my favourite vampire from one of my favourite authors, this crackling (punny!) series will have you binge-reading for days.

See full reviews:
Book One: Once Burned
Book Two: Twice Tempted
Book Three: Bound by Flames
Book Four: Into the Fire

Bonus

 

Lastly, if you haven’t yet checked out (or heard of) the fantasy romance series by yours truly, I’m adding it to this list, not because it comes anywhere close to the classics of the genre but because it does tick the boxes for magic and adventure in a faraway fictional land. (I visit this land on a basis far too frequently to be considered healthy or sane.)

I’ve added the synopsis below. Have a nosey. Check it out.

If you want to, that is. I’m not the queen or anything. Not today, anyway.

 

Immisceo: Taken (The Immisceo Series)

 

In the land of Nosiras, the Duciti’s word is law and their reign is absolute.

Luciana is a powerful witch: independent and wilful as she is strong. But when she is chosen by the Duciti to conceive an Immisceo witch to use as a weapon against Amara and her Outcasts, she has but two choices: obey with her freedom or without. When her Immisceo son is kidnapped, she will stop at nothing to get him back.

Nathaniel was born to the streets, then raised in an environment one rung down from captivity. Guarded by his older brother, he seeks freedom and adventure from his restrained life. Meeting Luciana will grant him one of these and will set him on a path which will test his ties of blood and love.

Caught between two enemies, Luciana and her unwitting companion are against the odds in their quest to save her son from a war that shouldn’t have been his to fight. In the hands of his kidnapper, Eli is as much a weapon as he would be in the Duciti’s—a weapon Luciana created. His life has been predetermined by those who would harm him, and Luciana must now right the wrongs she has dealt her son and save him from his fate—but at what cost?

 

Read the first three chapters now.

 

More about Immisceo

 Immisceo Taken review quote 2

 

 

What are your all-time favourite fantasy books? How many of the ‘fantasy classics’ have you read?

Let me know in the comments.

immisceo release and giveaway

Immisceo Release

The first book in the Immisceo series is finally out! I absolutely loved bringing Luciana and Nate to life and I’m so excited to be able to share this story with you. The World of Immisceo has been a joy to create and I hope you’ll enjoy living in it for a while. You can also explore the map of Nosiras or meet the characters before you dive into their story.

 

Since my opinion is understandably biased, here’s what one of my early readers have said about Immisceo: Taken:

 

‘If you like stories that involve a heroine’s quest for a just cause, a heroine with magical powers, and a lot of mild toned suspense, this book is definitely for you. The writing in Immisceo Taken is crisp and lean. It flows from one episode to another like in a good movie.’

 

immisceo taken - immisceo 1 - fantasy romance - fantasy series

In the land of Nosiras, the Duciti’s word is law and their reign is absolute.

Luciana is a powerful witch: independent and wilful as she is strong. But when she is chosen by the Duciti to conceive an Immisceo witch to use as a weapon against Amara and her Outcasts, she has but two choices: obey with her freedom or without. When her Immisceo son is kidnapped, she will stop at nothing to get him back.

Nathaniel was born to the streets, then raised in an environment one rung down from captivity. Guarded by his older brother, he seeks freedom and adventure from his restrained life. Meeting Luciana will grant him one of these and will set him on a path which will test his ties of blood and love.

Caught between two enemies, Luciana and her unwitting companion are against the odds in their quest to save her son from a war that shouldn’t have been his to fight. In the hands of his kidnapper, Eli is as much a weapon as he would be in the Duciti’s—a weapon Luciana created. His life has been predetermined by those who would harm him, and Luciana must now right the wrongs she has dealt her son and save him from his fate—but at what cost?

Get the paperback or ebook on Amazon now or read the first three chapters here before you buy.

BUY  

 

Amazon UK Amazon US

Giveaway

There’s still time to enter to win a free copy of Immisceo: Taken. If you’re on Goodreads, enter the giveaway before it ends on May 30th. Good luck!

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Immisceo Taken by Shona Moyce

Immisceo Taken

by Shona Moyce

Giveaway ends May 30, 2017.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

Enter Giveaway

The second book in this fantasy series is underway. Stay tuned for upcoming snippets. 

Happy reading!

immisceo quote - fantasy series

Immerse yourself in magic and adventure… 

in a new fantasy romance series

Power has many forms.

Magic is but one.

In the land of Nosiras, the Duciti’s word is law and their reign is absolute.

Luciana is a powerful witch: independent and wilful as she is strong. But when she is chosen by the Duciti to conceive an Immisceo witch to use as a weapon against Amara and her Outcasts, she has but two choices: obey with her freedom or without. When her Immisceo son is kidnapped, she will stop at nothing to get him back.

Nathaniel was born to the streets, then raised in an environment one rung down from captivity. Guarded by his older brother, he seeks freedom and adventure from his restrained life. Meeting Luciana will grant him one of these and will set him on a path which will test his ties of blood and love.

Caught between two enemies, Luciana and her unwitting companion are against the odds in their quest to save her son from a war that shouldn’t have been his to fight. In the hands of his kidnapper, Eli is as much a weapon as he would be in the Duciti’s—a weapon Luciana created. His life has been predetermined by those who would harm him, and Luciana must now right the wrongs she has dealt her son and save him from his fate—but at what cost?

For a taste of Immisceo: Taken, keep reading…

Fire curled in the old woman’s hand, bright and hungry as though it could already taste its next victim. Amara screamed at the sight of it.

‘Hush, girl,’ said the younger woman next to her. Her grip on Amara’s shoulder tightened like hooks in the girl’s flesh.

‘Please! Please let them go.’

The woman shushed her again and shook her. ‘Enough. Don’t make it worse for yourself,’ she scolded. She wrestled the girl to a standstill and glanced across the circle at the older woman.

‘It’s time,’ Rosamund said, flame held high. ‘You may say your brief goodbyes.’

The girl shoved against her captor, wrenching free. She lunged toward the circle’s centre, toward the waist-high pile of logs and kindling—toward her parents, bound against the pyre’s towering stake. Tumbling onto the wood-pile, the girl stretched out her arms in a futile attempt to embrace her weeping mother. A fist clamped in her hair and jerked her to a halt.

‘Don’t hurt her,’ the girl’s mother cried. ‘Please! She’s innocent.’

‘Innocent?’ Rosamund’s eyes widened in the dusky light and the flame in her hand flickered. ‘Her very existence is a crime onto itself.’

Amara’s mother shook her head. ‘No. Please, no. She’s just a child. It’s not her crime. It’s mine—’

‘And she will pay for it with her life.’

The mother wailed—a sharp, gut-wrenching howl that echoed in the wood-clearing and sent birds flapping skyward.

‘Enough!’ Rosamund barked. ‘If you’ve nothing to say save for your protest, let us be done with it.’

Amara shivered, wrapping her free arm across her chest and biting her lip to keep from crying. She studied the face of her father. His dark eyes bore into hers with intent. They flicked back and forth between hers and the face of the witch with the relentless grip on Amara’s shoulder. Amara frowned at him, wishing she had the power to read his mind.

‘Saba. Hand the girl over to Coen,’ Rosamund instructed.

Saba shuffled Amara along to the other side of the circle where a man stood waiting. The girl caught her father’s eye one last time, and words formed on his lips.

‘Touch her,’ he mouthed.

Amara blinked, comprehension lost on her as her father’s face disappeared from view. She stumbled, and Saba yanked her to her feet.

‘Look where you’re going, girl.’

She ignored the warning, glancing back at her father. His face was no longer visible, but his fists clenched repeatedly at his back. Not to escape his restraints, Amara realised, but as a message.

Almost too late, she laid both hands on her captor, clenching her small fists around the witch’s wrist, imitating her father. She flinched, startled by the new and compelling portal in her mind’s eye. Bright colours of energy swarmed under Saba’s skin. Hairs rose on the girl’s neck even as Saba wrestled against her, beginning to squirm easily out of the child’s grasp. But then Amara found it—the swirls of energy—dancing, translucent—and she clawed at them with her mind. She drew them into her, into her own hands, and Saba was locked in her grip. The girl pulled the swirling energy inside of her until she could feel the heat of it on her skin. Her eyes flew open as she pushed the magic from her tiny outstretched palm, gasping as the flame ripped through the air toward an unsuspecting Rosamund.

The old witch flared orange and fell to her knees, the single flame in her hand engulfed in the raging fire of the rest of her. Her skin and flesh blackened and shrivelled, and as quick as the fire began, it was gone, a spiral of smoke curling from the pile of ash where Rosamund had stood mere seconds before.

Amara looked from the ash to the palm of her hand, her eyes wide. Saba shrieked, and the male witch behind them, Coen, rushed forward. Amara pulled at Saba for more magic, but the swirls were nothing more now than threads. She flung the witch’s wrist from her clutches and ran toward the pyre.

Heat cracked alongside her, missing her by inches, not flames but lightning. She yelped, covering her head on instinct. She scrambled toward the stake, propelling her small body over the wood, ignoring the ache in her knees as she fell against the logs again and again.

‘Go! Amara—RUN!’

She shook her head at her father through tears. ‘I won’t leave you.’ She reached her mother first, flinging herself against her body, whilst fighting the knotted rope at her mother’s back. Beneath her, smoke began to rise, and the union of wood and flame crackled in her ears. ‘No… No!’ She swerved behind her parents, plucking at the knot with shaky too-small fingers.

‘Amara! Run, dammit, run!’

‘I can’t untie them. I can’t do it,’ she cried, throwing her fists against the ropes.

‘Leave us!’

She shook her head again, stepping around her mother. Then she thrust herself between her parents, throwing her skinny arms across their waists. They wept as the smoke rose steadily, the encroaching heat driving Amara closer and closer between them.

A white crack of lightning snapped at her feet, and she screamed again. The spark caught, orange and yellow flames licking their way toward the stake. Amara made to stamp on them, but another whip of lightning struck, this time to her right, missing her elbow a fraction of an inch. She looked down into the stone faces of Coen and Saba: there’d be no point in pleading.

Her father howled beside her as Coen cracked another bolt of lightning, this time at her father’s side. A deep welt appeared on his arm, blooming with blood that dripped at an alarming rate onto the logs. ‘Please, Amara. Leave us. I beg you. Run,’ her father cried. A solitary tear streaked down his cheek, glistening in the light of the fire. ‘Go,’ he pleaded.

She cast long looks at both her parents. A tight ache blossomed in her chest as the fire began to roar in earnest behind her. ‘I’m so sorry,’ she said. Then she slipped around her mother for the last time and ran. She hurtled to the base of the pyre, hidden in the curtain of smoke as she tumbled to the ground. Her breath came quick and heavy as she pelted toward the thicket of trees on the other side of the clearing. She didn’t dare look back.

Night fell swiftly upon her, the smoke disappearing with the light, the glow of the fire dimming. But the final cries of her parents echoed in Amara’s ears as she ran. And they would continue to echo for a long time to come.

Want to read more?

Immisceo: Taken releases May 16th, 2017.

Preorder your copy

 

Or read the first three chapters for FREE 

Into the Fire by Jeaniene Frost

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance | PAGES: 389

My rating: ★★★★

Into the Fire. We meet at last. Despite a series-finale being eagerly anticipated, there’s always a hint of trepidation when first opening the book. You’re filled with questions and worries like, Will it satisfy the wait? Will it live up to the awesomeness of the rest of the series? Will everyone fucking die?

I am obviously a stupid little worry wart.

Into the Fire is yet another unputdownable firecracker from Jeaniene Frost.

The story picks up where we left off in Bound by Flames and once more, we plunge headlong into action and antics with Leila and Vlad.

I am (still) blown away by my obsession with Vlad. His character never fails to enthral me on every level, be it his engaging presence, his self-assured acceptance of everything he is (the good and the bad), or the sheer complexity of his past. The many layers of his personality are intoxicating and in this series finale, he doesn’t disappoint.

His love for Leila knows no bounds. It is all-consuming, selfish even—and Vlad makes no apology for that. It is who he is—no more, no less. He is still arrogant and controlling and volatile but it is rooted in the hardships he’s been dealt over the centuries. It doesn’t read as a gimmick or a cop-out or a romanticised flaw because it is a truly deep and multi-layered history. Everything he is, is everything he had to become in order to cope, and instead of trying to change him, Leila embraces his flaws and loves him unconditionally.

It helps that she doesn’t squeak like a mouse in his presence either. She can hold her own, both with him and on the battlefield. Her strength shines in this book and her abilities reach new heights, even as enemies continue to use her as a weapon against Vlad.

A new element to the series is the inclusion of magic. It is refreshing and adds yet more excitement, further enriching the entire Night Huntress world and its mythology. I enjoyed Ian’s role in the story, too. He is funny and outlandish but his character adds more than comic relief—already there’s a visible and intriguing depth to who he is and I’m more than geared up for the upcoming spin-off series with him. (Night Rebel for anyone who doesn’t know.)

While I’m sad and disappointed that this is where Vlad and Leila’s story ends, their finale is epic and satisfying, and the series, as a whole, is one I’ll be rereading many times over.

 

See all reviews

 

 Into the Fire

 

In the explosive finale to New York Times bestselling author Jeaniene Frost’s Night Prince series, Vlad is in danger of losing his bride to an enemy whose powers might prove greater than the Prince of Vampires’ . . .In the wrong hands, love can be a deadly weapon. For nearly six hundred years, Vlad Tepesh cared for nothing, so he had nothing to lose. His brutal reputation ensured that all but the most foolhardy stayed away. Now, falling in love with Leila has put him at the mercy of his passions. And one adversary has found a devastating way to use Vlad’s new bride against him. A powerful spell links Leila to the necromancer Mircea. If he suffers or dies, so does she. Magic is forbidden to vampires, so Vlad and Leila enlist an unlikely guide as they search for a way to break the spell. But an ancient enemy lies in wait, capable of turning Vlad and Leila’s closest friends against them . . . and finally tearing the lovers apart forever.

The spooktacular holiday of All Hallows’ Eve is almost upon us and besides donning my slutty nurse costume (jk), I can’t think of a better way to get a head start on the spooks than by curling up with a good book… in particular, books about witches. In fact, Halloween or otherwise, I’m always up for a witchy read in any shape or form—fantastical, historical, those who embrace their magic and those who want nothing more than to be ‘normal’ (Witches, please… normal is overrated).

Here are my seven favourite books about witches to get you in the mood for trick or treating.

  books about witches - a discovery of witches

A Discovery of Witches

Deborah Harkness

Loved this. The perfect blend of history and fantasy in both a modern and historical time setting with memorable characters, including a protagonist who struggles to accept her powers, and a charismatic vampire (in case it isn’t exciting enough already). Shadow of Night (the follow-up) is chock full of all the elements of the first book, throwing time travel into the mix alongside encounters with some of history’s greats. Brilliant series!

  books about witches - witch child

Witch Child

Celia Rees

One of my absolute favourites. This is yet another beautifully written story weaving together the fictional story of Mary of Salem with just enough historical elements to immerse you in the past. Written in journal entries, Mary’s story is captivating and is a must-read for fans of Salem witch stories.

  books about witches - macbeth

Macbeth

William Shakespeare

Now, I love me some Shakespeare (especially the Sonnets <3) but I’ll admit that I only read Macbeth in school… so, needless to say, I didn’t fully appreciate it at the time. Whether that’s my excuse or not, I’ll admit: as deep and tragic as the actual play is, for me, it’s those three witches who are truly unforgettable—and that classic cauldron chanting is unrivalled.

 books about witches - uprooted

Uprooted

Naomi Novik

My most recently discovered gem, Uprooted has become a fast favourite for me. A standalone adult fantasy with Beauty and the Beast elements, the storytelling is steeped in nature and the magic is breathtaking. Despite the fairytale elements, it is quite unlike any other magical story I’ve ever come across. Read my full and unashamedly gushing review here.

 books about witches - tim and the hidden people

Tim and the Hidden People

Sheila K McCullagh

I read this series as a child. Try to buy this online, I dare you, and the price will make your eyes pop. I can’t condone the staggering cost, but the stories, if you can get your hands on them are lovely. Maybe it’s nostalgia, maybe not, but these stories were undoubtedly my gateway for all things magical.

 books about witches - the witches

The Witches

Roald Dahl

Classic Roald Dahl. (The Twits is still my favourite.) As an adult, I love The Witches, both the book and the film adaptation, but it definitely scared me as a child. These witches are mean bitches. As always, though, his books are full of humour—unique and insightful; funny, twisted stories about (some) funny, twisted characters with brilliant morals at the heart of it all. The Witches is no exception and if you didn’t read it as a child, do it now. Your inner child will thank you.

 books about witches - wicked

Wicked

Gregory Maguire

A retelling of the Wizard of Oz, this is one of those stories that flips the switch and gives you an alternate point of view: the villain’s, with the Wicked Witch of the West as the protagonist, I’m currently reading this one and enjoying the storytelling immensely so far. I’m also a sucker for the morally grey, slightly misunderstood characters, and it doesn’t get any better than the Wicked Witch. (Exceptions may include Damon Salvatore.)

  books about witches - harry potter

Honourable mention: Harry Potter

J K Rowling

What witch list would be complete without mentioning the world of Hogwarts, School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. I’m still waiting on my bloody letter. Stupid owl has clearly gotten lost. The witches and wizards of Hogwarts and the world of Harry Potter are regulars on most book lists. The series is a phenomenal modern classic and quite frankly, if you haven’t heard of this one yet, where the hell have you been? Get reading.

 

There you have seven—well, eight—witch tales to get you all fired up for October 31st festivities.

What are your favourite magic books? Who is your favourite witch? How many times have you hollered ‘Accio!’ in the last ten years?

Let me know in the comments.

Uprooted by Naomi Novik

GENRE: FANTASY | PAGES: 448

My rating: ★★★★★

Uprooted was the perfect blend of fantasy and fairy tale. I loved it. The story begins with the brief history of the routine taking of a girl by the Dragon. Agnieszka eventually meets him, and under the flimsy rumours of all the village and all the taken girls before her, believes she should fear for her life and her virtue.

Our Dragon doesn’t eat the girls he takes, no matter what stories they tell outside our valley.

Instead, what awaits her is magic. She possesses it and so does the Dragon, and as she settles into her role as apprentice, she learns that the real danger is the Wood—a living breathing entity which threatens her life and the lives of everyone in her village. The Dragon is a protector but so focused on the task he’s been given, he has, in his immortal existence, become cold and distant. Little by little, Agnieszka breaks down the Dragon’s walls and learns to embrace her power instead of fearing it.

The story has been likened to a loose retelling of Beauty and The Beast, and I can see the resemblance there in the most basic of elements–it was this that initially appealed to me–but this book goes above and beyond the fairy tale.

The magic in this book is beautiful. The element of it is brought to life with wondrous detail, steeped in the essence of the entire novel: nature. Nature and magic are fully intertwined; even spells are demonstrated as the growth of nature–an intricate blossoming of a flower or a ferocious eruption of moss and decay–the description is vivid and imaginative.

Agnieszka begins her journey as a fearful, cautious girl, reluctant to step into the spotlight. When she embraces who she truly is, she shows great strength–a wilful, stubborn bravery, and a tender understanding toward the often arrogant Dragon.

Her relationship with him is believable, realistically and beautifully written, evolving first into mutual respect and trust, struggling with their own misgivings before fully embracing and accepting their inevitable love.

This is one of the best books I’ve read this year and my only disappointment is that it is not part of a series—I would gladly jump back into this fascinating, beautiful world.
 

 uprooted book cover

Agnieszka loves her valley home, her quiet village, the forests and the bright shining river. But the corrupted Wood stands on the border, full of malevolent power, and its shadow lies over her life. Her people rely on the cold, driven wizard known only as the Dragon to keep its powers at bay. But he demands a terrible price for his help: one young woman handed over to serve him for ten years, a fate almost as terrible as falling to the Wood.

The next choosing is fast approaching, and Agnieszka is afraid. She knows – everyone knows – that the Dragon will take Kasia: beautiful, graceful, brave Kasia, all the things Agnieszka isn’t, and her dearest friend in the world. And there is no way to save her. But Agnieszka fears the wrong things. For when the Dragon comes, it is not Kasia he will choose.

From the author of the Temeraire series comes this hugely imaginative, engrossing and vivid fantasy novel, inspired by folk and fairy tales. It is perfect reading for fans of Robin Hobb and Trudi Canavan.

Witch Song by Amber Argyle

GENRE: FANTASY, PARANORMAL, ROMANCE, YA | PAGES: 305

My rating: ★★★★

I read a lot of YA novels, and the beginning stages of this one made me believe it was too specifically aimed at a more teenage demographic. The early chapters seemed juvenile in part and lacked depth. I nearly abandoned it.

I’m so glad I didn’t.

The lacklustre start gave way to a host of well-developed main characters, and intriguing secondary characters, set in a wonderful (?)medieval world of magic. The plot has Senna at the centre, the last witch, standing against Espen and her followers to reclaim the witches’ natural power and affinity with nature, and free the rest of her kind. Senna develops from a naive and innocent young girl to a witch with a powerful song, and it is believable and relatable because of the struggles she endures to get there. Through loss and abandonment, she pushes past her fears and insecurities, despite them never fully leaving her. Her insecurity is a flaw which follows her throughout the book, but it is justified, due to her sheltered past, and the ill-treatment she receives as a witch-born.

Witch Song is a beautifully written book, with its magic based on the pagan tradition and style of nature. I’d recommend it to anyone who, like me, finds themselves drawn to books with old witch magic. 

 

See all reviews

 

 Witch Song

 

Brusenna is the last.

All the other witches have been captured, their songs stolen and twisted from harmony and growth into chaos and death. She alone must stand against an evil much older and darker than anything she could ever imagine—an evil every witch before her has failed to vanquish.

Brusenna must be the first.

A Nomadic Witch (A Modern Witch, #4) by Debora Geary

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance | PAGES: 263

My rating: ★★★★

I am enjoying the A Modern Witch series even more as it goes on.

I love the Witch Central base formation over the course of the last four books. It really lends a Disney quality to the series. The characters are even more well-rounded than in the beginning and it feels like I’ve come to know them.

Moira is the grandmother of all grandmothers; Nell is a fierce and fiery superwoman, and Devin–ahh, Devin… sigh…

Really, those three are my personal favourites, but every one of Geary’s creations now resonates with true, individual character.

This book, A Nomadic Witch, saw development in Marcus, perpetual grump with a big but broken heart, having lost his twin brother to the Mists forty years earlier.

The arrival of a baby from the Mists that only he can care for opens a channel into the pain he has tried to bury since he was five, and he learns to love the witchling as his own. The problem is that she is a traveller of the Mists just as his twin was and now he has to fight to keep her safe or risk losing himself again.

I liked the fact that this book didn’t shy away from his pain. As light-hearted as the series is, I feel it gave it so much more depth; part of the reason I also really liked A Reckless Witch.

I haven’t downloaded the others yet… as much as I love them I find the continuous new characters a little tedious; I intend to complete the series eventually though after a little break away from the Disney movie warmth.

*Having angst-monkey withdrawal symptoms.*

 

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  A Nomadic Witch (A Modern Witch, #4)

 

Spring brings a traveller to Nova Scotia – a tiny babe who will turn Marcus’s life upside down and reincarnate the horrifying events of his past. Can Marcus find his way through the pain to love and healing? And can the witching community finally learn to keep their astral travellers safe? A Nomadic Witch is book four of the top-rated A Modern Witch series. Light contemporary fantasy with a good dose of humour, a little romance, and characters you won’t want to leave.

A Reckless Witch (A Modern Witch, #3) by Debora Geary

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance | PAGES: 304

My rating: ★★★★

One word: Devin! I have such a crush on the reckless, free-spirited man-boy! He becomes an honorary brother to the titular Reckless Witch in Geary’s third installment of the A Modern Witch series.

Excessive ‘cookie eating’ and ‘punk witchling’ name tags aside, I have only good things to say about this series so far. And they’re getting better every time. If you’re in the mood for a lighthearted, heartwarming read with humour, family values, and modern magic thrown in the mix–this is it.

I’m hooked. And I’m usually a drama junkie, angst-monkey. But I just can’t help myself. 🙂

 

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 A Reckless Witch (A Modern Witch, #3)

 

With great power comes great responsibility. So says the tradition of witching. One teenage witch missed that lesson… As a child, Sierra Brighton traveled the world. She swam with the baby whales, danced in storm funnels, and lived in complete magical freedom. And then Momma died and Sierra ended up in foster care, an unhappy and very secret witch. Fetched by Nell’s spell, she’ll no longer need to do magic on lonely beaches – but can Sierra learn to use her power safely? Or will her reckless blood put Witch Central at risk?

A Discovery of Witches (All Souls Trilogy, #1) by Deborah Harkness

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance | PAGES: 602

My rating: ★★★★

I am enjoying this series so far. A Discovery of Witches was intriguing from the very beginning although sometimes the storytelling was a bit long-winded. That said, it kept my interest and now I simply must continue the adventure. Matthew is typically hot-headed and overprotective, and his knowledge and experiences are amazingly written. Diana is on a self-discovering journey and each piece of magic and witchcraft is captured on the page in fine detail.

The pair made a fine couple to read about (even though Matthew’s abstinence makes me want to scream).

I can’t say it’s the best ‘witchy’ book I’ve ever read but it IS the best in a long time.
 

 

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 A Discovery of Witches

 

A richly inventive novel about a centuries-old vampire, a spellbound witch, and the mysterious manuscript that draws them together. Deep in the stacks of Oxford’s Bodleian Library, young scholar Diana Bishop unwittingly calls up a bewitched alchemical manuscript in the course of her research. Descended from an old and distinguished line of witches, Diana wants nothing to do with sorcery; so after a furtive glance and a few notes, she banishes the book to the stacks. But her discovery sets a fantastical underworld stirring, and a horde of daemons, witches, and vampires soon descends upon the library. Diana has stumbled upon a coveted treasure lost for centuries-and she is the only creature who can break its spell.

Witch Child (Witch Child, #1) by Celia Rees

GENRE: Fantasy, YA | PAGES: 240

My rating: ★★★★

I thoroughly enjoyed Witch Child for the captivating tale it told. The whole story had just enough fact amongst the fiction to make it believable as a true case. I liked that. Mary was strong and a real survivor–I cared about what happened to her from page one.

This is a memorable favourite for me and one of the best books about witches I’ve read.

 

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Witch Child

 

Enter the world of young Mary Newbury, a world where simply being different can cost a person her life. Hidden until now in the pages of her diary, Mary’s startling story begins in 1659, the year her beloved grandmother is hanged in the public square as a witch. Mary narrowly escapes a similar fate, only to face intolerance and new danger among the Puritans in the New World. How long can she hide her true identity? Will she ever find a place where her healing powers will not be feared?