strong female characters

Strong female characters are everywhere these days. Right?

Perhaps.

The Damsel in Distress has certainly screamed her last plea for help, and we hear a lot about Kick-Ass Females in both book and movie culture. But it seems to me that we all have a slightly different idea of what makes a woman ‘strong’.

I love a heroine who can fight her way through a room full of henchmen with nothing but a… nail file as much as the next person. (I’m kidding about the nail file. Totally kidding.) I also love a heroine who isn’t afraid to hold her own when faced with a douchey, retro-thinking side character or antagonist who hasn’t yet caught up with the rest of us.

But you know what I love more than that?

Inner strength.

I’m talking about a test of true character in the face of adversity. Or acknowledgement of a fatal flaw and the overcoming of it. Or belief in something no one else believes in and a willingness to stand up for the cause anyway—and triumphing. You get the picture right?

Let me preface what I’m about to say with this: there is nothing wrong with physical strength—hell, I want to be Wonder Woman when I grow up—and a female character who displays physical prowess is generally viewed as capable and fiercely independent. There are more and more women owning their physical capabilities as genderless and in their own right but for the longest time, this type of strength was measurable by comparing it to that of a man. Physical strength was (and sadly in some pockets of the world, still is) viewed as a primarily masculine trait or ability. And this type of strength is but one of many examples.

How many times have we seen (in all media) a woman portrayed/acknowledged as an equal based solely on her ability to fight or play sports or fix a car? That’s cool and all, but these are learnable skills for either sex; not a determining factor of a woman’s strength.

Female characters who demonstrate their ability to overcome the ‘Man’s World’ stigma are nothing short of empowering. But once again, it emphasises the divide between genders. I get that this is important for the sake of progress in equality but I still abhor the way we often use a previously ‘masculine’ skill or ability as a standard measure.

The strengths I appreciate and LOVE to see portrayed are those which are fundamentally HUMAN—without gender biases. For me, this type of strength, the kind which is definitive by character alone, is ten times more liberating.

 

Here are eight of my favourite strong female characters

 

Chiyo / Sayuri from Memoirs of a Geisha

Chiyo’s strength is in her ability to thrive under the crushing hardships; to endure the limitations of her culture even when it means burying her emotions and denying herself fleeting happiness in order to survive long-term. She pursues her goals with a steely yet poignant determination to the height of success then finally an arrangement with the man she loves. 

“Adversity is like a strong wind. I don’t mean just that it holds us back from places we might otherwise go. It also tears away from us all but the things that cannot be torn, so that afterward we see ourselves as we really are, and not merely as we might like to be.”
― Arthur Golden, Memoirs of a Geisha

strong female characters - memoirs of a geisha
Vintage / Columbia Pictures / Dreamworks

 

Celie from The Colour Purple

Celie’s strength is an admirable and often unbelievable force. She is resilient yet pure. Despite having every opportunity to turn a ruthless cheek to the world, she doesn’t. Time and time again, I expect her faith to waver but she thrives beneath her misfortunes and comes out the other side stronger than ever with a wider understanding and acceptance of herself and the world she lives in.

“I think us here to wonder, myself. To wonder. To ask. And that in wondering bout the big things and asking bout the big things, you learn about the little ones, almost by accident. But you never know nothing more about the big things than you start out with. The more I wonder, the more I love.”
― Alice Walker, The Colour Purple

strong female characters - the colour purple
Washington Square Press / Warner Bros.

 

Elizabeth from Pride and Prejudice

Elizabeth’s strength is in her very nature. She is self-assured and principled, and despite the inhibiting time in which she lived, she never swayed from her individuality. She was not afraid to be who she was even under the scathing eye of society. Then, when her prejudices came to light, she readily acknowledged them, admitted and owned her errors, and ultimately overcame them.

“There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me.”
― Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

strong female characters - pride and prejudice
Penguin / Universal

 

Hermione from Harry Potter

Hermione’s strength is embedded in her fierce loyalty and friendship with Harry and Ron, and in her innate sense of what is good and right. She is not afraid to be the odd one out or stand for causes she deems worthy. By embracing and nurturing her smarts and ambition, she saves the day over and over.

“But from that moment on, Hermione Granger became their friend. Because there are somethings you can’t go through in life and become friends, and knocking out a twelve-foot mountain troll is one of them.”
― J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone

strong female characters - harry potter
Bloomsbury / Warner Bros.

 

Elinor from Sense and Sensibility

Elinor’s strength is quiet and understated but nevertheless rock-solid. Her sense of propriety and responsibility is both a blessing and a curse and the way in which she bears her family’s hardships is nothing short of admirable. She is the glue that holds the Dashwood family together and although her practical approach leaves her wanting when it comes to matters of the heart, eventually, she strikes a balance within herself and takes a risk. Though she does find happiness, her inner struggle to open up is long and achingly tender, made more poignant by the contrast of her strength and wisdom in all other matters.

“…After all that is bewitching in the idea of a single and constant attachment, and all that can be said of one’s happiness depending entirely on any particular person, it is not meant — it is not fit — it is not possible that it should be so.”
― Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility

strong female characters - sense and sensibility
Penguin / Columbia Pictures

 

Jo from Little Women

All the women in this book have strength in their own way. For me, Beth stood out for her unwavering compassion but Jo is my favourite. A little like Elizabeth Bennett, Jo is confident and candid and feisty; she is stubborn and leads with her passion—be that of heart or mind—and despite everything thrown at her, her strength is embedded in the fact that she remains true to who she is throughout.

“I’m glad you are poor. I couldn’t bear a rich husband,” said Jo decidedly, adding in a softer tone, “Don’t fear poverty. I’ve known it long enough to lose my dread and be happy working for those I love. . . .”
— Louisa May Alcott, Little Women

strong female characters - little women
Penguin / Columbia Pictures

 

Éowyn from Lord of the Rings

Her strength is in her determination. Éowyn plays her part in battle with admirable physical strength but her real strength though is the fierce motivation she possesses. She wants to give her all to her cause and she’s willing to die to do so.

“What do you fear, lady?” [Aragorn] asked.
“A cage,” [Éowyn] said. “To stay behind bars, until use and old age accept them, and all chance of doing great deeds is gone beyond recall or desire.”
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

strong female characters - lord of the rings
Mariner Books / New Line Cinema

 

Melanie from The Girl with All the Gifts

Her strength is in defying and overcoming the base instincts of who she has become in the horrific dystopian world she lives in. Instead of succumbing to her natural urges, she embraces the humanity within her despite the extreme odds and in doing so, proved to both herself and those around her that strength of will can save us all if we have the nerve to risk everything.

“And then like Pandora, opening the great big box of the world and not being afraid, not even caring whether what’s inside is good or bad. Because it’s both. Everything is always both. But you have to open it to find that out.”
― M.R. Carey, The Girl with All the Gifts

 

strong female characters - the girl with all the gifts
Orbit / Poison Chef / BFI

 

Which strong female characters are on your favourites list? What strengths do you value?

Tell me in the comments.

seven things I wish I'd known when I was younger

Life is full of lessons. Unfortunately, there’s no handbook. And let’s be real: even if there was one, we probably wouldn’t read it. We’d struggle along anyway, convinced that we know the ins and outs without the need for instructions, setting up our lives like it’s nothing more than a bookshelf from IKEA. Still, there are a few lessons I wish I’d been privy to. It would have saved me time. It would have saved me all those years ‘in the trenches’ with nothing but my self-doubt for company. Here are seven things I wish I’d known when I was younger.

 

1. Take Chances

There are a million reasons not to try. You could fill a stadium with those reasons: What if it’s the wrong decision? What if you’re not good enough? What if you fail? If you never try, that’s the same as failure. Success is rooted in taking chances. Don’t wait for permission. You may not get it—nor do you need it.

 

2. Don’t Wait

It’s easy to put off doing the things you want to do simply out of complacency. Don’t wait until you’re ready. You’ll never be ready. Ready is a perpetually mythical state of being, much like the notion of ‘One day…’ It simply doesn’t exist. There’s only now.

 

3. Do the Work

How many times have you told yourself ‘I really want to XYZ, if only I had the time/skills/money/[insert excuse here]’? It’s a hard lesson to learn but despite the reasons we concoct for ourselves—often so legitimately constructed that we start to believe them—the only thing holding us back is ourselves. If you’ve got something you want to do, do it. Don’t invent obstacles. Instead, take steps to get to where you want to be. Inspiration won’t show up unless you do. Dreams won’t work unless you do. Do the work.

 

4. Don’t Live According to Someone Else

Family, friends, and society in general, all have an ideal when it comes to how we should be living. There is no shortage of expectations—and if/when you go against the grain, be prepared for some major backlash and guilt. But do it anyway. If you want something that is seen to be outside of the norms, this response is inevitable. Just remember: no one else can or should determine what you do with your time or your life. Live according to your wants and needs and let other people’s opinions take a backseat.

 

5. Don’t Let Fear Dictate

Fear of failure or even (mind-blowingly) fear of success can cripple you. Don’t let it. Acknowledge the fact that fear is an absolutely routine factor when undertaking something new. Be afraid—but don’t let it stop you; let it challenge you.

 

6. Embrace Change

Changes are inevitable. Don’t fight them. Changes—be it changes within yourself or someone close to you, or even changes in your circumstances—can leave you feeling lost or have you hankering for the past like a nostalgic dreamer. The past is gone. It’s okay to open yourself to new interests and new people. Treasure your old memories but allow yourself to make new ones.

 

7. Acknowledge Your Differences

It’s okay to be different. It’s okay to be the odd one out. From an early age, we’re programmed with the need to ‘fit in’. With adulthood comes a liberating sense of self that can override that need. Embrace who you are and nurture your individuality. Carve your own path.

50 of the Best Opening Lines in Fiction Books

Despite the warning not to ‘judge a book by its cover’, I’d bet we’ve all been guilty of it more than a few times. A cover is a window of sorts into the book. It’s a test as to whether or not the book is worth our precious bookworm hours. Having passed that test though, there’s another favourite way to measure a potential new book: the opening lines.

You know you’ve discovered a gem of a book when you open it and find yourself hooked in a single sentence. You want to continue reading. Immediately. Opening lines are often the stuff of writers’ nightmares and rightly so, since for readers, those all-important first words are the deciding vote when it comes to adding a book to the read pile or not.

Show of hands for those with To-Be-Read piles taller than the average human…

It’s about to get a little taller.

Here are fifty memorable opening lines from literature. The kind that will have you running to the bookstore. (Or you know, hitting up Amazon. 21st-century perks don’t come any better than that.)

Opening Lines from some of my Favourite Books

 

1. ‘Once upon a time, there was a prostitute called Maria.’ — Eleven Minutes, Paulo Coelho

 

2. ‘Our Dragon doesn’t eat the girls he takes, no matter what stories they tell outside our valley.’ — Uprooted, Naomi Novik

 

3. ‘You better not never tell nobody but God.’ — The Color Purple, Alice Walker

 

4. ‘It was no accident.’ — Ferney, James Long

 

5. ‘It was a queer, sultry summer, the summer they electrocuted the Rosenbergs, and I didn’t know what I was doing in New York.’ — The Bell Jar, Sylvia Plath

 

6. ‘People ask, How did you get in there? What they really want to know is if they are likely to end up in there as well. I can’t answer the real question. All I can tell them is, It’s easy.’ — Girl, Interrupted, Susanna Kaysen

 

7. ‘I stiffened at the red and blue lights flashing behind me, because there was no way I could explain what was in the back of my truck.’ — Halfway to the Grave, Jeaniene Frost

 

8. ‘On the morning the last Lisbon daughter took her turn at suicide—it was Mary this time, and sleeping pills—the two paramedics arrived at the house knowing exactly where the knife drawer was, and the gas oven, and the beam in the basement from which it was possible to tie a rope.’— The Virgin Suicides, Jeffrey Eugenides

 

9. ‘All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.’ — Anna Karenina, Leo Tolstoy

 

10. ‘It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.’ — Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

 

Classic Opening Lines

 

11. ‘If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you’ll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like… and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don’t feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth.’ — The Catcher in the Rye, J.D. Salinger

 

12. ‘Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul.’ — Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov

 

13. ‘It was a pleasure to burn.’ — Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury

 

14. ‘Once upon a time and a very good time it was there was a moocow coming down along the road and this moocow that was coming down along the road met a nicens little boy named baby tuckoo…’ — A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, James Joyce

 

15. ‘Call me Ishmael. Some years ago—never mind how long precisely—having little or no money in my purse, and nothing particular to interest me on shore, I thought I would sail about a little and see the watery part of the world.’ — Moby Dick, Herman Melville

 

16. ‘When Mr. Bilbo Baggins of Bag End announced that he would shortly be celebrating his eleventy-first birthday with a party of special magnificence, there was much talk and excitement in Hobbiton.’ — Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien

 

17. ‘Ships at a distance have every man’s wish on board.’ — Their Eyes Were Watching God, Zora Neale Hurston

 

18. ‘In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I’ve been turning over in my mind ever since. ‘Whenever you feel like criticising any one,’ he told me, ‘just remember that all the people in this world haven’t had the advantages that you’ve had.’ — The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald

 

19. ‘I write this sitting in the kitchen sink.’ — I Capture the Castle, Dodie Smith

 

20. ‘It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.’ — 1984, George Orwell

 

21. ‘As Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from uneasy dreams he found himself transformed in his bed into an enormous insect.’ — The Metamorphosis, Franz Kafka

 

22. ‘It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way – in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.’ — A Tale of Two Cities, Charles Dickens

 

23. ‘We slept in what had once been the gymnasium.’ — The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood

 

24. ‘Miss Brooke had that kind of beauty which seems to be thrown into relief by poor dress.’ — Middlemarch, George Eliot

 

25. ‘Mother died today.’ — The Stranger, Albert Camus

 

26. ‘All this happened, more or less.’ — Slaughterhouse-Five, Kurt Vonnegut

 

27. ‘Scarlett O’Hara was not beautiful, but men seldom realised it when caught by her charm as the Tarleton twins were.’ — Gone with the Wind, Margaret Mitchell

 

Modern Gems (and I use the term ‘modern’ loosely)

 

28. ‘Late in the winter of my seventeenth year, my mother decided I was depressed, presumably because I rarely left the house, spent quite a lot of time in bed, read the same book over and over, ate infrequently, and devoted quite a bit of my abundant free time to thinking about death.’ — The Fault in Our Stars, John Green

 

29. ‘The terror, which would not end for another twenty-eight years—if it ever did end—began, so far as I know or can tell, with a boat made from a sheet of newspaper floating down a gutter swollen with rain.’ — It, Stephen King

 

30. ‘124 was spiteful. Full of a baby’s venom.’ – Beloved, Toni Morrison

 

31. ‘A mile above Oz, the witch balanced on the wind’s forward edge, as if she were a green fleck of the land itself…’ — Wicked, Gregory Maguire

 

32. ‘Having placed in my mouth sufficient bread for three minutes’ chewing, I withdrew my powers of sensual perception and retired into the privacy of my mind, my eyes and face assuming a vacant and preoccupied expression.’ — At Swim-Two-Birds, Flann O’Brien

 

33. ‘The darkness behind my eyelids was thick and stank of chemicals, as though someone has poured black oil inside my head.’ — Ultraviolet, R J Anderson

 

34. ‘The night breathed through the apartment like a dark animal.’ — Reckless, Cornelia Funke

 

35. ‘Today I’m five. I was four last night going to sleep in Wardrobe, but when I wake up in Bed in the dark I’m changed to five, abracadabra.’ — Room, Emma Donoghue

 

36. ‘In the afterlife you relive all your experiences but this time with the events reshuffled into a new order: all the moments that share a quality are grouped together. You spend two months driving the street in front of your house, seven months having sex. You sleep for thirty years without opening your eyes. For five months straight you flip through magazines while sitting on a toilet. You take all your pain at once, all twenty-seven intense hours of it. Bones break, cars crash, skin is cut, babies are born. Once you make it through, it’s agony-free for the rest of your afterlife. But that doesn’t mean it’s always pleasant.’ — Sum, David Eagleman

 

37. ‘For the better part of my childhood, my professional aspirations were simple–I wanted to be an intergalactic princess.’ — Seven Up, Janet Evanovich

 

38. ‘I have lived more than a thousand years. I have died countless times.’ — My Name is Memory, Ann Brashares

 

39. ‘I, Lucifer, Fallen Angel, Prince of Darkness, Bringer of Light, Ruler of Hell, Lord of the Flies, Father of Lies, Apostate Supreme, Tempter of Mankind, Old Serpent, Prince of This World, Seducer, Accuser, Tormentor, Blasphemer, and without doubt Best Fuck in the Seen and Unseen Universe (ask Eve, that minx) have decided—oo-la-la!—to tell all.’ — I, Lucifer, Glen Duncan

 

40. ‘The circus arrives without warning.’ — The Night Circus, Erin Morgenstern

 

41. ‘I’ve been locked up for 264 days.’ — Shatter Me, Tahereh Mafi

 

42. ‘First the colors. Then the humans. That’s usually how I see things. Or at least, how I try. HERE IS A SMALL FACT: You are going to die.’ — The Book Thief, Markus Zusak

 

43. ‘Like most people, I didn’t meet and talk to Rant Casey until after he was dead.’ — Rant, Chuck Palahniuk

 

44. ‘The small boys came early to the hanging.’ — Pillars of the Earth, Ken Follett

 

45. ‘I’m pretty much fucked.’ — The Martian, Andy Weir

 

46. ‘There was a hand in the darkness, and it held a knife.’ — The Graveyard Book, Neil Gaiman

 

47. ‘They say the world is flat and supported on the back of four elephants who themselves stand on the back of a giant turtle.’ — The Fifth Elephant, Terry Pratchett

 

48. ‘It’s a funny thing about mothers and fathers. Even when their own child is the most disgusting little blister you could ever imagine, they still think that he or she is wonderful.’ — Matilda, Roald Dahl

 

49. ‘The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there.’ — The Go-Between, L. P. Hartley

 

And finally, the quintessential sentence that has stood the test of time…

 

 once upon a time | 50 of the best opening lines in fiction books

50. ‘Once upon a time…’ Grimm’s Fairy Tales, Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm

 

What makes a good first sentence? What are some of your favourite opening lines? Share them with me in the comments section below so I can add a few more books to my ridiculous ambitious TBR pile.

love quotes

 

I would have written you, myself, if I could put down in words everything I want to say to you. A sea of ink would not be enough.

— Erin Morgenstern, The Night Circus

 

I love you as certain dark things are to be loved, in secret, between the shadow and the soul.

— Pablo Neruda, 100 Love Sonnets

 

Soul meets soul on lovers’ lips.

— Percy Bysshe Shelley, Prometheus Unbound

 

If all else perished and he remained, I should still continue to be; and if all else remained and he were annihilated, the universe would turn to a mighty stranger.

— Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights

 

No amount of fire or freshness can challenge what a man will store up in his ghostly heart.

— F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

 

In all the world, there is no heart for me like yours. In all the world, there is no love for you like mine.

— Maya Angelou

 

He was my North, my South, my East and West, My working week and my Sunday rest.

— W H Auden, Stop All The Clocks

 

You don’t love someone because they’re perfect, you love them in spite of the fact that they’re not.

— Jodi Picoult, My Sister’s Keeper

 

I want to know you moved and breathed in the same world with me.

— F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald

 

This hole in my heart is in the shape of you and no-one else can fit it.

Jeanette Winterson,  Written on the Body 

 

Even when this world is a forgotten whisper of dust between the stars, I will always love you.

— Sarah J. Maas, Empire of Storms

 

The way her body existed only where he touched her. The rest of her was smoke.

— Arundhati Roy, The God Of Small Things

 

If I were to live a thousand years, I would belong to you for all of them. If we were to live a thousand lives, I would want to make you mine in each one.

— Michelle Hodkin, The Evolution of Mara Dyer

 

Do I love you? My god, if your love were a grain of sand, mine would be a universe of beaches.

— William Goldman, The Princess Bride

 

You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope… I have loved none but you.

— Jane Austen, Persuasion

 

Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind. And therefore is wing’d Cupid painted blind.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream

 

The curves of your lips rewrite history.

— Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

 

To love or have loved, that is enough.

— Victor Hugo, Les Miserable

 

Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same.

— Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights

 

No measure of time with you will be long enough. But let’s start with forever.

— Stephenie Meyer, Breaking Dawn

 

After all this time?
Always.

— J. K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

christmas gift

So, you’re shopping for a book lover… Or you wanna treat yo’self… If so, it’s kind of a no-brainer that books will be at the top of your shopping list. But why not spice it up a bit? Go the extra mile.

Here are ten literary gifts to make you swoon. 

 

1. Literary merchandise

What better way to show off your book love than with a piece of merchandise adorned with a favourite quote or sentiment. I am loving this mug, this bag, and this necklace below. Sigh.

gifts for book lovers - jane eyre necklace
Via notonthehighstreet.com

 

2. More literary goodies

Or how about a framed page print of a favourite book, like this Pride and Prejudice print below. 

gifts for book lovers - pride and prejudice page print
Via theliterarygiftcompany.com

 

3. Movie adaptations

Yes, we love books, and more often than not we’ll annoy you with outbursts of ‘the book was better!’ BUT there are some amazing film adaptations of our favourite stories. Some of my favourites include Lord of the Rings, Girl Interrupted, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, and Practical Magic. 

gifts for book lovers - lord of the rings boxset
Via Amazon UK

 

4. Booklight

Need a sneaky bedtime-reading fix? Significant other too misguided to understand the call of One-Last-Chapter Syndrome? This booklight will help, and whilst hardly a new concept, this particular design is the dandiest I’ve seen in a while. It’s a bookshelf, booklight, and bookmark—all-in-one!

gifts for book lovers - lililite booklight
Via lililite.com

 

5. Bookends

When you’ve run out of actual bookshelves, you need a place to store your precious hoard. Those babies won’t stand up on their own. Here’s one option:

gifts for book lovers - bookends
Via theliterarygiftcompany.com

 

6. Library set

The only thing worse than not being able to show off your bookshelves, is showing off your bookshelves and having someone say: ‘Oo, could I borrow that?’ If you can’t get away with telling that person to ‘eff off’, this cute little library kit will at least put an end to all lending woes.  

gifts for book lovers - library kit
Via booklovergifts.com

 

7. Bookmarks

We’ll mark our page with anything. A ribbon, a receipt, our beloved pet (not really.) We also have an enormous collection of bookmarks and can quite easily concoct an excuse a reason for another… like this beautiful feather bookmark:

gifts for book lovers - feather bookmark
Via notonthehighstreet.com

 

8. Book List Journal

Maybe you’ve never heard of Goodreads, or perhaps you have but you simply love (or prefer) the act of handwriting in a journal (I get it). This journal is specifically for book lists: books you’ve read, by genre, by favourites, favourite spots to read… and so on. It’s a lovely way to document your reading history offline, if you’re into that. 

gifts for book lovers - literary listography journal
Via Amazon UK

 

9. Kindle Paperwhite

Whether you’re aboard the electronic book train or not, this version of the Kindle is a beauty. Just LOOK AT IT. It’s practically a REAL book. Only without the weight and WITH a built-in nightlight. Add in a subscription to Kindle Unlimited and you’re golden.

gifts for book lovers - kindle paperwhite
Via Amazon UK

 

10. Finally, More Books. Duh.

There’s no such thing as too many books. If all else fails and you’ve reached the end of your Christmas shopping rope, get a hold of their To-Read list and have at it. Here’s mine.  You know, just in case. (Wink-wink.) 

 

Happy holidays!

Back in September, I spent three solid days shamelessly glued to the PlayStation with Uncharted 4. For those of you who aren’t gamers, Uncharted is a series of role-play action-adventure games featuring Nathan Drake—a wisecracking hunk of beefcake with a penchant for treasure hunting and getting himself into gun-fighting pickles. One could argue that video games can hardly be counted as ‘Book Chat’ material but the Uncharted franchise is so beautifully story-oriented that I’m letting this one slide.

The latest instalment ( Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End) has the main protagonist, Nate, following the trail of real-life pirate Henry Avery, and his colony, in search of a ‘treasure of a lifetime’, all in the name of saving his long-lost brother, Sam. It’s a mashup (as always) of Indiana Jones and Die Hard (but with an even better storyline) and Nate is ridiculously easy on the eye—not to mention a stickler for an impossible mission.

Which got me thinking (not as rare an occurrence as you’d think): Nate’s flaws are plenty but they make him doubly attractive—and relatable—particularly handy, since we can’t possibly relate to his knack for hurling himself willy-nilly off cliffs and the like.

So I decided to make a list. (I love a good list.)

Here are five of Nathan Drake’s character flaws commonly found in a host of other fictional characters from books, TV, and film.

1. OBSESSION

Number one on a LOT of lists, the flaw of obsession is hardly uncommon. Whether it’s a thirst for revenge or a fool’s errand in pursuit of riches or power, characters whose obsessions take command of their lives are aplenty. Nathan Drake is no exception. In earlier games, his reckless need to beat his opponents and uncover the mystery of whatever lost treasure he’s tracking, drove him to extremes. In Uncharted 4, he’s finally out of the thief game, living a normal and oh-so-mundane life. This time, the lure of the treasure is second in line to the need to play hero—and bail out his brother. Nonetheless, the obsession fogs his view, clouding his judgment in more than one instance, and leading him to do things he shouldn’t. Like lie. And steal. And murder people left, right, and centre…

“Let’s see… I ruined my marriage. Drove my best friend away. And now my brother’s gone missing. On the bright side: at least there’s no one around to call me an idiot.” — Nathan Drake, A Thief’s End (Naughty Dog)

Oh, Nate… You idiot.

Image Source

Other obsessive fools we (kind of) relate to:

Regina Mills (Evil Queen) from Once Upon a Time

Source

Captain Ahab from Moby Dick by Herman Melville

Source

Lady Macbeth from Macbeth by William Shakespeare

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2. ARROGANCE

So, obviously Nate is a… superfly guy. I know it, you know it, he knows it—and boy, does he milk it. His arrogance gets him into bigger trouble fifty percent of the time but more often than not, it’s his arrogance that gets him out of it in the end. Also, it’s charming as all hell.

Other arrogant bastards we love:

CAPTAIN Jack Sparrow from Pirates of the Caribbean

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Vlad Tepesh from The Night Prince by Jeaniene Frost

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Damon Salvatore from The Vampire Diaries

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3. OVER-PROTECTIVENESS

Of course we all want someone in our lives willing to go the extra mile to protect us and make us feel all warm and cosy and secure at night. But when said person begins omitting truths (blatantly lying) and manipulating events to try to protect us, it can be, quite frankly, annoying. I’m more than capable of deciding whether to risk getting myself killed or not, thank you very much, Nate. I don’t need you to decide for me just to play the big hero… Oh wait, that wouldn’t be ALL bad, I guess… (well, there goes my girl power.)

Other over-protective control freaks we secretly want to hug:

Stefan Salvatore from The Vampire Diaries

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Edward Cullen from Twilight (I’m sensing a theme here…)

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(Young) Charles Xavier from X-Men: First Class

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4. SMART ASS-ery

The line is: ‘No one likes a smart ass,’ but I beg to differ. I LOVE a smart ass, but I should point out that this pertains only to the fictional world. Nathan Drake is a one-liner genius, resorting to quick wit and one-uppers against his foes even in the face of mortal peril. 

Flynn: “Found the ships though, didn’t I?”

Nate: “You couldn’t find your ass with both hands.”

— Uncharted 2: Among Thieves (Naughty Dog)

Other smart-asses we find hilarious:

Doctor Cox from Scrubs

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Chandler Bing from Friends

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Damon Salvatore from TVD

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I know! I listed him twice. Sorry. (Not sorry.)

 

5. GREY MORALITY

This is by far one of my favourite character flaws, whether it’s in a book, film or any other media. It’s so deliciously complex, and builds intrigue and excitement around the character. When it comes to morally grey characters, we find ourselves succumbing to their plea, empathising with their cause no matter how ludicrous, and no matter the cost. We tend to overlook their (often) criminal or unjust behaviour, making up ridiculous excuses: ‘I know he just killed nearly an entire army, but he HAS to save his brother, dammit!’ (Me, on Nate.) These folk really know how to spin our moral compasses.

Other morally grey souls we make excuses for:

Thorin Oakenshield from Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien

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Rumpelstiltskin (Mr Gold) from Once Upon a Time

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Damon Salvatore from The Vampire Diaries 

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Last time, I swear.

And there you have it. My list of character flaw observations to justify the hours spent lost in the world of Uncharted when I should have been writing.

It was completely worth it. 🙂

What are your favourite flaws? Who are your favourite flawed characters? Who did I leave off the list? We all know who I didn’t leave off the list. (Still not sorry.) Let me know below in the comments.

The spooktacular holiday of All Hallows’ Eve is almost upon us and besides donning my slutty nurse costume (jk), I can’t think of a better way to get a head start on the spooks than by curling up with a good book… in particular, books about witches. In fact, Halloween or otherwise, I’m always up for a witchy read in any shape or form—fantastical, historical, those who embrace their magic and those who want nothing more than to be ‘normal’ (Witches, please… normal is overrated).

Here are my seven favourite books about witches to get you in the mood for trick or treating.

  books about witches - a discovery of witches

A Discovery of Witches

Deborah Harkness

Loved this. The perfect blend of history and fantasy in both a modern and historical time setting with memorable characters, including a protagonist who struggles to accept her powers, and a charismatic vampire (in case it isn’t exciting enough already). Shadow of Night (the follow-up) is chock full of all the elements of the first book, throwing time travel into the mix alongside encounters with some of history’s greats. Brilliant series!

  books about witches - witch child

Witch Child

Celia Rees

One of my absolute favourites. This is yet another beautifully written story weaving together the fictional story of Mary of Salem with just enough historical elements to immerse you in the past. Written in journal entries, Mary’s story is captivating and is a must-read for fans of Salem witch stories.

  books about witches - macbeth

Macbeth

William Shakespeare

Now, I love me some Shakespeare (especially the Sonnets <3) but I’ll admit that I only read Macbeth in school… so, needless to say, I didn’t fully appreciate it at the time. Whether that’s my excuse or not, I’ll admit: as deep and tragic as the actual play is, for me, it’s those three witches who are truly unforgettable—and that classic cauldron chanting is unrivalled.

 books about witches - uprooted

Uprooted

Naomi Novik

My most recently discovered gem, Uprooted has become a fast favourite for me. A standalone adult fantasy with Beauty and the Beast elements, the storytelling is steeped in nature and the magic is breathtaking. Despite the fairytale elements, it is quite unlike any other magical story I’ve ever come across. Read my full and unashamedly gushing review here.

 books about witches - tim and the hidden people

Tim and the Hidden People

Sheila K McCullagh

I read this series as a child. Try to buy this online, I dare you, and the price will make your eyes pop. I can’t condone the staggering cost, but the stories, if you can get your hands on them are lovely. Maybe it’s nostalgia, maybe not, but these stories were undoubtedly my gateway for all things magical.

 books about witches - the witches

The Witches

Roald Dahl

Classic Roald Dahl. (The Twits is still my favourite.) As an adult, I love The Witches, both the book and the film adaptation, but it definitely scared me as a child. These witches are mean bitches. As always, though, his books are full of humour—unique and insightful; funny, twisted stories about (some) funny, twisted characters with brilliant morals at the heart of it all. The Witches is no exception and if you didn’t read it as a child, do it now. Your inner child will thank you.

 books about witches - wicked

Wicked

Gregory Maguire

A retelling of the Wizard of Oz, this is one of those stories that flips the switch and gives you an alternate point of view: the villain’s, with the Wicked Witch of the West as the protagonist, I’m currently reading this one and enjoying the storytelling immensely so far. I’m also a sucker for the morally grey, slightly misunderstood characters, and it doesn’t get any better than the Wicked Witch. (Exceptions may include Damon Salvatore.)

  books about witches - harry potter

Honourable mention: Harry Potter

J K Rowling

What witch list would be complete without mentioning the world of Hogwarts, School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. I’m still waiting on my bloody letter. Stupid owl has clearly gotten lost. The witches and wizards of Hogwarts and the world of Harry Potter are regulars on most book lists. The series is a phenomenal modern classic and quite frankly, if you haven’t heard of this one yet, where the hell have you been? Get reading.

 

There you have seven—well, eight—witch tales to get you all fired up for October 31st festivities.

What are your favourite magic books? Who is your favourite witch? How many times have you hollered ‘Accio!’ in the last ten years?

Let me know in the comments.

As a reader, I enjoy multiple genres of books, and picking a favourite is, for me, not just impossible but criminal. Having said that, there are a few that stand out. These books are the ones I nose-dived my way through; they hooked me at first word and had that can’t-eat can’t-sleep effect. There’s also one other thing they all have in common: the storytelling is fearless. 

Here are my Top 3 Fearless Books

Fearless Books

Forbidden

“You can close your eyes to the things you do not want to see, but you cannot close your heart to the things you do not want to feel.”

 

If ever there’s even such a thing as ‘fearless books’ outside of my reading bubble, this is one that would make the cut with its hands tied behind its back. I will rave about this story until I’m senile or dead. Never have I read a story that compelled me as much as this did to turn a blind eye to the norms of society. The author took a taboo subject—incest—and spun it on its head, with characters so real and relatable that I could do nothing BUT root for them, even though on a basic level I knew I shouldn’t have. The story has never left me, and I dare you to read it and let it haunt you too.

Full review of Forbidden

Fearless Books

The Tied Man

“The summer I met Lilith Bresson, I had begun to die. Not physically, you understand. I had never been that lucky. But each day a little more of my soul disappeared.”

 

I read this one only recently, and it is by far one of the most disturbing books I’ve ever come across. That’s not to say it isn’t good. The writing is brilliant; the fast-paced action, dry (dark) humour, and the isolated setting really lend themselves to the atmosphere of the book. The real fearless quality though is in the characters and the extent of horror of the events. Never have I read something which made me cringe as much as this book did, yet I couldn’t have put it down if you’d paid me to.

Full review of The Tied Man

Fearless Books

The Bell Jar

“I felt very still and empty, the way the eye of a tornado must feel, moving dully along in the middle of the surrounding hullabaloo.”

 

A fairly modern classic, The Bell Jar is well-known and well-loved, and one of my all-time favourites. I can relate to so much of Sylvia Plath’s work and her only novel is no exception. The subject centres around the protagonist’s fledging writing career, and her struggle with mental illness (loosely based on Sylvia Plath’s own life). The style of writing is poetic (not for everyone) and Plath demonstrates that remarkable and elusive skill of taking a bleak and morbid situation, and transforming it into compelling prose. This, to me, is as fearless as it gets.

Full review of The Bell Jar

So, fellow bookworms, what would you consider your favourite fearless books? Which of them has a permanent haunt spot in your life? Tell me in the comments.

10 Things a Writer Says and What It REALLY Means

1. Writing a book

Having a half-formed idea for a story which you scribble about for several weeks/months/years, with no real clue about what you are doing until you have already done it.

2. Editing a manuscript

Sitting in front of the computer in your pyjamas, pulling your hair out, whilst swearing and deleting stuff, wondering whether you even understand the concept of the written word.

3. Doing research for a book

Alternating between Facebook, Twitter and your project, gathering notes and screenshots, with a Google search history that places you in the same category as a spy/scientist/historian/superhero/sex addict/crazy person/murderer [delete where appropriate].

4. Querying agents (for the traditional authors)

Perfecting a letter that could get you elected as president. Emailing said letter to a literary agent, attaching your ACTUAL soul (the manuscript). Entertaining various mental states as you wait for rejection, then repeating the entire process. Times INFINITY. 

5. Building an author platform

Standing in a small, holey bucket in a sea of internet content, screaming ‘Look at me!’ at passing seagulls.

6. Marketing a book

Running yourself ragged, reading every article known to humanity on marketing techniques, then resuming your (one-sided) conversation with the seagulls.

7. Networking

Connecting with fellow writers, then immediately comparing yourself to them, followed by curling into the foetal position.

8. Analysing book sales reports

Compulsively checking book sales and sales ranking, and returning to the foetal position.

9. Requesting reviews

Sending your book to other bookworms for free, so they can rip your writing to shreds in the public domain. (Or happily, NOT.)

10. Persevering

Trying, failing, writing, rewriting, growing, learning. It sucks and it exhilarates you, in equal measures, but you do it anyway, because you love being a writer, and you cannot imagine NOT being one. JUST. KEEP. GOING.

 

And if you’re looking for something a little less… ridiculous and a little more helpful, check out my FAQ post for writing tips that don’t involve seagulls. Visit that post here: FAQs: Why are you a writer? How do I become a writer? And more…

 

writing. perseverance. 10 Things a Writer Says and What It REALLY Means

bucket

Alternative title: All the crap I want to do before I kick the bucket. 

Updated Nov 2016

Personal goals 

Accept myself Quit smoking Identify 100 things that make me happy Kick depression’s ass Learn to forgive Make a difference somehow Be individual  Stop following ideals and plans of others  Find out more about my ancestors/heritage/family tree Build some savings Pay off my loan Find the love of my life Get married Set up a home Become a mother Have a golden wedding anniversary Write a letter to my (future?) children telling them about the lessons I’ve learned Write a letter to my younger self Get my Goodreads To-Be-Read shelf to 25

Professional goals 

Finish writing a novel Publish a novel Complete a degree Publicise / sell artwork Find a job I love / be my own boss Own a studio for writing/art Start a club/group (online) Be part of a writing community Try NaNoWriMo Do an activity for charity

Fun goals 

Jump into the ocean fully clothed Kiss a girl Own a herb garden Drink from a coconut 🙂 Fly a kite Learn to juggle Sing at a karaoke Have a threesome Go to a drive-in movie Sleep under the stars Shower under a waterfall Ride in a hot air balloon Go paintballing Drive a quad bike Ride a motorbike Love someone I shouldn’t Ride a roller coaster Skinny dip Have sex on a beach Watch the sunrise Donate used books Quit a job I hate Fly a plane Scuba dive Plant a tree Fast for 3 days Start a collection Sew something Get a tattoo Have a spa weekend Donate blood Solve a Rubiks Cube

Discover & Learn 

Visit the British Museum Take an art class Learn to play chess Learn sign language See a tiger up close Swim with dolphins Learn to play a new instrument Learn a second language Learn to say ‘hello’ in 50 different languages See a legendary musician Explore past life regression Get a palm reading Take a salsa class Attend a rock concert Read the complete works of Shakespeare See Phantom of the Opera Live Show Volunteer or campaign Get involved with safeguarding for abuse/rape victims

Travel goals 

See the Northern Lights Go to Disney World, Florida Visit Cuba Sip Sangria in a Spanish courtyard Visit San Francisco Visit London Visit the Caribbean Set foot on all seven continents – Antarctica, Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia, South America, North America Live in a foreign country Go travelling for a month See the Great Barrier Reef See the Grand Canyon See the Pyramids See the Colosseum See the Taj Mahal Smoke a joint in Holland Ride a gondola in Venice Visit Stonehenge Stay on a remote island  (Crossing this one off feels like cheating!)Take a ‘love photo’ with the Eiffel Tower in the background Have an adventure – throw a dart at a map or spin a globe and point, and travel to the place marked!

 

What’s on your bucket list?