A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance | PAGES: 421

My rating: ★★★

I desperately wanted to love A Court of Thorns and Roses. It’s a fantasy romance and a Beauty and the Beast retelling of sorts. There is such hype for the entire series to the point where I convinced myself it couldn’t possibly be anything but fantastic.

Sadly, for me, it fell a little flat.

Don’t get me wrong—it’s a decent story, compelling enough to keep me reading until the end and maybe even venturing into the rest of the series. But I can’t pretend I’m not disappointed.

Feyre is an underwhelming main character. She has potential; she’s a skilled hunter and a pretty decent human being—showcased in the provisions and sacrifices she made for her ungrateful family. But between her early stupid choices, her (sometimes) redundant narration, and her artist’s eye seeing the world ‘in colour’… she became—frankly—irritating. Yes. She’s a painter. She knows the name of ten different shades of blue. I get it. I don’t need it shoved down my throat.

The Beast—Tamlin—should have had the potential to make me swoon. He’s obviously gorgeous, he’s powerful, and so on and so on but there’s something not nearly as beastly about him as I’d been anticipating. Lucien on the other hand is a great character—and Rhys is even better. Both Lucien and Rhys have far more depth, and their complexities add intrigue. Even their personalities are more interesting than Tamlin’s, although I get that Tamlin is probably intentionally silent and brooding.

The author does a good job of setting up the world of the Fae. There was a little too much exposition for my personal liking, with side characters who served little purpose other than the relaying of important information to the protagonist. That said, the extravagant wealth and enchantment of the Fae world comes through and the scenes in nature are written beautifully if a little overdone at times. I loved the different creatures of the world and I liked the setup of the various Courts with their corresponding seasons and magic. I also liked the simmering romance between Tamlin and Feyre. It isn’t as epic as I’d hoped for but all in all, it carried me through the book.

I’m in no hurry to pick up the next instalment in this series but the setup for continuation of the storyline is intriguing enough to keep it on my to-read pile, and with much of the world-building out of the way, book two—and the subtle promise of the implications with Rhys—might make for an exciting follow-up to A Court of Thorns and Roses.

 

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  a court of thorns and roses

 

When nineteen-year-old huntress Feyre kills a wolf in the woods, a beast-like creature arrives to demand retribution for it. Dragged to a treacherous magical land she only knows about from legends, Feyre discovers that her captor is not an animal, but Tamlin—one of the lethal, immortal faeries who once ruled their world. As she dwells on his estate, her feelings for Tamlin transform from icy hostility into a fiery passion that burns through every lie and warning she’s been told about the beautiful, dangerous world of the Fae. But an ancient, wicked shadow grows over the faerie lands, and Feyre must find a way to stop it . . . or doom Tamlin—and his world—forever.

Ruin and Rising by Leigh Bardugo

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance, YA | PAGES: 432

My rating: ★★★★

Ruin and Rising, the final book in The Grisha Trilogy, wraps up the series in a neat little bow. The story picks up right where we left off in book two and Alina, Mal, and their band of misfits have yet another dilemma to get out of and one last amplifier to track down.

I loved the friendships that developed in this book and both major twists in the book were heartrending and superbly written.

Spoiler Alert ahead!

The ending is… a happily-ever-after, I guess, if bittersweet. All the loose ends are tied, all is right with the world, and Alina gets what she’s longed for.

And yet—call me deranged—I longed for more. I longed for something else entirely. I longed for a completely different scenario—with the Darkling.

Despite his flaws and the horrors of what he’d become; despite the twisted manipulation and his hunger for power at any cost; despite all of his darkness, I wanted Alina’s balancing light to be his salvation.

So, while the series was wonderful and I enjoyed it immensely, the ending leaves me dissatisfied and a little disappointed. Although, clearly, I’m a hopeless romantic with some major psychological issues, so unless you’re like me, you have nothing to worry about. The World of the Grisha has become a fast favourite of mine and I’ve added Six of Crows (another series within the Grishaverse) to my to-read pile.

 

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  ruin and rising

 

The capital has fallen. The Darkling rules Ravka from his shadow throne. Now the nation’s fate rests with a broken Sun Summoner, a disgraced tracker, and the shattered remnants of a once-great magical army. Deep in an ancient network of tunnels and caverns, a weakened Alina must submit to the dubious protection of the Apparat and the zealots who worship her as a Saint. Yet her plans lie elsewhere, with the hunt for the elusive firebird and the hope that an outlaw prince still survives. Alina will have to forge new alliances and put aside old rivalries as she and Mal race to find the last of Morozova’s amplifiers. But as she begins to unravel the Darkling’s secrets, she reveals a past that will forever alter her understanding of the bond they share and the power she wields. The firebird is the one thing that stands between Ravka and destruction—and claiming it could cost Alina the very future she’s fighting for.

Siege and Storm by Leigh Bardugo

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance, YA | PAGES: 401

My rating: ★★★★★

Siege and Storm is five-star worthy storytelling. Book two trumps book one. The pacing is faster, more thrilling and intense; the world building is still luxuriously detailed but more subtle and controlled, and the characters breathe with life.

Alina steps up in this book and we get to see her embrace who she is. She possesses a newfound strength in this book and she wears it well. I love the rising conflict between her and Mal. I love the addition of chameleonic Nikolai. I love the intriguing but sinister allure of the Darkling.

In short, I loved this book. Even more than the first. I read it in a day and I’m about to pull an all-nighter for book three.

 

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  siege and storm

 

Darkness never dies. Hunted across the True Sea, haunted by the lives she took on the Fold, Alina must try to make a life with Mal in an unfamiliar land. She finds starting new is not easy while keeping her identity as the Sun Summoner a secret. She can’t outrun her past or her destiny for long. The Darkling has emerged from the Shadow Fold with a terrifying new power and a dangerous plan that will test the very boundaries of the natural world. With the help of a notorious privateer, Alina returns to the country she abandoned, determined to fight the forces gathering against Ravka. But as her power grows, Alina slips deeper into the Darkling’s game of forbidden magic, and farther away from Mal. Somehow, she will have to choose between her country, her power, and the love she always thought would guide her–or risk losing everything to the oncoming storm.

Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance, YA | PAGES: 369

My rating: ★★★★

The World of the Grisha is rich with culture and magic. From page one, Shadow and Bone is enchanting—full of wonder and originality in the midst of a new, exciting setting rife with intrigue and danger. I couldn’t get enough at first.

Then, for me, the story lagged with too many chunks of scene setting and description and I found myself disconnected with the characters. This momentary lapse was short, however.

On coming back to it, the story gathered pace. Alina met new people, she struggled with training, she came into her strength, then made some plot-twisting discoveries. I was hooked once more and the initial overdone descriptive style gave way to a sprinkling of original world building amidst an intriguing plot line. The rest of the book is brilliantly written and I devoured the final two-thirds in one sitting.

Alina is like most YA protagonists. She begins her journey as a somewhat weak average teenager and finds herself and her power along the way. She is innocent and naive but also likeable and believable, and by the end of this first book, she shows enormous intelligence and courage.

I love Mal. There’s an extra section at the end that showcases his character perfectly. A letter to Alina. He is honourable and strong and obviously the ‘perfect’ match for Alina. (Note the quote marks, please.)

Yet, my favourite character by far, is the Darkling. He walks that thin grey line of morality and while the depth of his complexities seems to have only been touched upon, I’m hoping the rest of the series will do him the justice he deserves. I’m already quite in love with him.

‘Make me your villain.’ — The Darkling

 

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shadow and bone

 

Surrounded by enemies, the once-great nation of Ravka has been torn in two by the Shadow Fold, a swath of near impenetrable darkness crawling with monsters who feast on human flesh. Now its fate may rest on the shoulders of one lonely refugee. Alina Starkov has never been good at anything. But when her regiment is attacked on the Fold and her best friend is brutally injured, Alina reveals a dormant power that saves his life—a power that could be the key to setting her war-ravaged country free. Wrenched from everything she knows, Alina is whisked away to the royal court to be trained as a member of the Grisha, the magical elite led by the mysterious Darkling. Yet nothing in this lavish world is what it seems. With darkness looming and an entire kingdom depending on her untamed power, Alina will have to confront the secrets of the Grisha . . . and the secrets of her heart. Shadow and Bone is the first installment in Leigh Bardugo’s Grisha Trilogy.

immisceo release and giveaway

Immisceo Release

The first book in the Immisceo series is finally out! I absolutely loved bringing Luciana and Nate to life and I’m so excited to be able to share this story with you. The World of Immisceo has been a joy to create and I hope you’ll enjoy living in it for a while. You can also explore the map of Nosiras or meet the characters before you dive into their story.

 

Since my opinion is understandably biased, here’s what one of my early readers have said about Immisceo: Taken:

 

‘If you like stories that involve a heroine’s quest for a just cause, a heroine with magical powers, and a lot of mild toned suspense, this book is definitely for you. The writing in Immisceo Taken is crisp and lean. It flows from one episode to another like in a good movie.’

 

immisceo taken - immisceo 1 - fantasy romance - fantasy series

In the land of Nosiras, the Duciti’s word is law and their reign is absolute.

Luciana is a powerful witch: independent and wilful as she is strong. But when she is chosen by the Duciti to conceive an Immisceo witch to use as a weapon against Amara and her Outcasts, she has but two choices: obey with her freedom or without. When her Immisceo son is kidnapped, she will stop at nothing to get him back.

Nathaniel was born to the streets, then raised in an environment one rung down from captivity. Guarded by his older brother, he seeks freedom and adventure from his restrained life. Meeting Luciana will grant him one of these and will set him on a path which will test his ties of blood and love.

Caught between two enemies, Luciana and her unwitting companion are against the odds in their quest to save her son from a war that shouldn’t have been his to fight. In the hands of his kidnapper, Eli is as much a weapon as he would be in the Duciti’s—a weapon Luciana created. His life has been predetermined by those who would harm him, and Luciana must now right the wrongs she has dealt her son and save him from his fate—but at what cost?

Get the paperback or ebook on Amazon now or read the first three chapters here before you buy.

BUY  

 

Amazon UK Amazon US

Giveaway

There’s still time to enter to win a free copy of Immisceo: Taken. If you’re on Goodreads, enter the giveaway before it ends on May 30th. Good luck!

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Immisceo Taken by Shona Moyce

Immisceo Taken

by Shona Moyce

Giveaway ends May 30, 2017.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

Enter Giveaway

The second book in this fantasy series is underway. Stay tuned for upcoming snippets. 

Happy reading!

The Scarlet Thread by D. S. Murphy

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance, YA | PAGES: 384

My rating: ★★★★

The Scarlet Thread is fast-paced and utterly compelling, and more than that, it is steeped in rich Greek mythology.

Kaidance has the gift of the Fates. She spends years of her life detesting who she is. She is strong but she is unaware of her full potential. Still, she is refreshingly proactive. I love her voice. She is not as naive as most YA protagonists and her smarts are believable—linked to every experience she’s ever encountered in her short life.

The world she’s thrown into is like a step back in time—an immersion into Greek mythology. The characters are intriguing and their true identities are sprinkled throughout the story in a way that makes this book impossible to put down. The story is layered and compelling, centred not just on Kaidance but also that of a centuries-spanning war.

My only gripe is the cliffhanger ending but that’s purely because I’m desperate to know how this story plays out.

   the scarlet thread

 

My name is Kaidance Monroe, and sometimes when I touch people, I see how they die. After I saw my little brother’s death but failed to stop it, my parents abandoned me to a juvenile detention facility. I don’t let people touch me anymore. Not my fingertips, not my skin, not my heart. Just before I turned 18, I got a visit from a cute guy, who tricked me into giving up my secrets. He said I was special, but he wasn’t the only one searching for me. I barely escaped with my life. Now I’m in a mansion, learning how to control my abilities – abilities so powerful, even the gods are jealous. I didn’t mean to make anyone fall for me. Certainly not my would-be killer. And I never imagined how far he would fall.

The Successful Author Mindset by Joanna Penn

GENRE: Non-Fiction | PAGES: —

My rating: ★★★★★

The Successful Author Mindset is as insightful as it is inspiring. It is so inspiring in fact, that it might actually be a hug disguised as a book. It’s also a treasure trove of quotes from other writers and professionals that’ll make you feel as though you’re doing something right if only because you resonate with the things they say. (There are days when this is all I can hang on to.)

“I’m afraid of failing at whatever story I’m writing—that it won’t come up for me, or that I won’t be able to finish it.” — Stephen King

More than that, though, The Successful Author Mindset is, as the title suggests, a book that maps out and offers guidance on some of the inner pitfalls of writer life—common writer problems such as the need for validation, creative block, and the infamous champion of them all: self-doubt. Along with well-selected quotes from other creatives, each topic is also accompanied by an excerpt from the author’s personal journals, documenting her thoughts, before moving on to an antidote that might help others to move past these problems.

Joanna Penn’s advice has always been my go-to in terms of the helpful writing and marketing tips she freely shares on her website The Creative Penn. But this book is not a book of tips. Instead, this is a (much-needed) look at the journey of a writer—and the inevitable trials along the way.

We have to learn to self-validate, to understand that the writing process is the point, rather than the reception of our work or the rewards that may or may not come. We need to nourish ourselves with the practice of creation. — Joanna Penn

I’d recommend this to any writer feeling the strain of self-doubt or the fear of failure. Some of us are lucky enough to be confident about ourselves and the work we create. For the rest of us, thankfully, there are books like this one.

 

See all reviews

 

 The Successful Author Mindset

 

Being a writer is not just about typing. It’s also about surviving the roller-coaster of the creative journey. Self-doubt, fear of failure, the need for validation, perfectionism, writer’s block, comparisonitis, overwhelm, and much more. When you’re going through these things, it can feel like you’re alone. But actually, they are part of the creative process, and every author goes through them too. This book collects the mindset issues that writers experience, that I have been through myself over the last nine years, and that perhaps you will experience at different times on the creative journey. Each small chapter tackles a possible issue and then offers an antidote, so that you can dip in and out over time. It includes excerpts from my own personal journals as well as quotes from well-known writers. I hope it helps you on the road to becoming a successful author.

Into the Fire by Jeaniene Frost

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance | PAGES: 389

My rating: ★★★★

Into the Fire. We meet at last. Despite a series-finale being eagerly anticipated, there’s always a hint of trepidation when first opening the book. You’re filled with questions and worries like, Will it satisfy the wait? Will it live up to the awesomeness of the rest of the series? Will everyone fucking die?

I am obviously a stupid little worry wart.

Into the Fire is yet another unputdownable firecracker from Jeaniene Frost.

The story picks up where we left off in Bound by Flames and once more, we plunge headlong into action and antics with Leila and Vlad.

I am (still) blown away by my obsession with Vlad. His character never fails to enthral me on every level, be it his engaging presence, his self-assured acceptance of everything he is (the good and the bad), or the sheer complexity of his past. The many layers of his personality are intoxicating and in this series finale, he doesn’t disappoint.

His love for Leila knows no bounds. It is all-consuming, selfish even—and Vlad makes no apology for that. It is who he is—no more, no less. He is still arrogant and controlling and volatile but it is rooted in the hardships he’s been dealt over the centuries. It doesn’t read as a gimmick or a cop-out or a romanticised flaw because it is a truly deep and multi-layered history. Everything he is, is everything he had to become in order to cope, and instead of trying to change him, Leila embraces his flaws and loves him unconditionally.

It helps that she doesn’t squeak like a mouse in his presence either. She can hold her own, both with him and on the battlefield. Her strength shines in this book and her abilities reach new heights, even as enemies continue to use her as a weapon against Vlad.

A new element to the series is the inclusion of magic. It is refreshing and adds yet more excitement, further enriching the entire Night Huntress world and its mythology. I enjoyed Ian’s role in the story, too. He is funny and outlandish but his character adds more than comic relief—already there’s a visible and intriguing depth to who he is and I’m more than geared up for the upcoming spin-off series with him. (Night Rebel for anyone who doesn’t know.)

While I’m sad and disappointed that this is where Vlad and Leila’s story ends, their finale is epic and satisfying, and the series, as a whole, is one I’ll be rereading many times over.

 

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 Into the Fire

 

In the explosive finale to New York Times bestselling author Jeaniene Frost’s Night Prince series, Vlad is in danger of losing his bride to an enemy whose powers might prove greater than the Prince of Vampires’ . . .In the wrong hands, love can be a deadly weapon. For nearly six hundred years, Vlad Tepesh cared for nothing, so he had nothing to lose. His brutal reputation ensured that all but the most foolhardy stayed away. Now, falling in love with Leila has put him at the mercy of his passions. And one adversary has found a devastating way to use Vlad’s new bride against him. A powerful spell links Leila to the necromancer Mircea. If he suffers or dies, so does she. Magic is forbidden to vampires, so Vlad and Leila enlist an unlikely guide as they search for a way to break the spell. But an ancient enemy lies in wait, capable of turning Vlad and Leila’s closest friends against them . . . and finally tearing the lovers apart forever.

The One Memory of Flora Banks by Emily Barr

GENRE: YA CONTEMPORARY | PAGES: 320

My rating: ★★★★★

Disclaimer: I received a free review copy of this book from the publisher. All opinions are my own.

HOW DO YOU KNOW WHO TO TRUST WHEN YOU CAN’T EVEN TRUST YOURSELF?

I look at my hands. One of them says ‘FLORA, BE BRAVE.’

This book swept me up in a wave of intrigue and compassion. Flora Banks is one of the best female characters I’ve read in a while—a powerhouse of inner strength. She just doesn’t remember who she is and what she’s capable of.

I loved Flora’s voice and felt an immediate connection with her from page one. The narrative is chilling—crafted with an alternating pace and clarity depending on Flora’s state of mind. At times it is fluent, teeming with such life that Flora’s spirit and tenacity radiate off the page. Other times, it is purposefully convoluted, repetitive—like actually stepping into the sweeping confusion of a seventeen-year-old amnesiac’s mind.

The repetition does not detract from the story; quite the opposite, in fact. It enhances it in that every subtle word change becomes a clue in the puzzle of Flora’s world. Because that’s what it is: an enigma that propels you from chapter to chapter, neither knowing nor trusting the words even as the story unfurls before you.

Flora’s unique personality, the Cornish and Arctic settings, the story as a whole—they are all refreshingly original and compelling. Add to that the cleverly crafted unreliable narrator and you have yourself an absolute must-read.

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  the one memory of flora banks

Seventeen-year-old Flora Banks has no short-term memory. Her mind resets itself several times a day, and has since the age of ten, when the tumor that was removed from Flora’s brain took with it her ability to make new memories. That is, until she kisses Drake, her best friend’s boyfriend, the night before he leaves town. Miraculously, this one memory breaks through Flora’s fractured mind, and sticks. Flora is convinced that Drake is responsible for restoring her memory and making her whole again. So when an encouraging email from Drake suggests she meet him on the other side of the world, Flora knows with certainty that this is the first step toward reclaiming her life. With little more than the words “be brave” inked into her skin, and written reminders of who she is and why her memory is so limited, Flora sets off on an impossible journey to Svalbard, Norway, the land of the midnight sun, determined to find Drake. But from the moment she arrives in the arctic, nothing is quite as it seems, and Flora must “be brave” if she is ever to learn the truth about herself, and to make it safely home.

christmas gift

So, you’re shopping for a book lover… Or you wanna treat yo’self… If so, it’s kind of a no-brainer that books will be at the top of your shopping list. But why not spice it up a bit? Go the extra mile.

Here are ten literary gifts to make you swoon. 

 

1. Literary merchandise

What better way to show off your book love than with a piece of merchandise adorned with a favourite quote or sentiment. I am loving this mug, this bag, and this necklace below. Sigh.

gifts for book lovers - jane eyre necklace
Via notonthehighstreet.com

 

2. More literary goodies

Or how about a framed page print of a favourite book, like this Pride and Prejudice print below. 

gifts for book lovers - pride and prejudice page print
Via theliterarygiftcompany.com

 

3. Movie adaptations

Yes, we love books, and more often than not we’ll annoy you with outbursts of ‘the book was better!’ BUT there are some amazing film adaptations of our favourite stories. Some of my favourites include Lord of the Rings, Girl Interrupted, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, and Practical Magic. 

gifts for book lovers - lord of the rings boxset
Via Amazon UK

 

4. Booklight

Need a sneaky bedtime-reading fix? Significant other too misguided to understand the call of One-Last-Chapter Syndrome? This booklight will help, and whilst hardly a new concept, this particular design is the dandiest I’ve seen in a while. It’s a bookshelf, booklight, and bookmark—all-in-one!

gifts for book lovers - lililite booklight
Via lililite.com

 

5. Bookends

When you’ve run out of actual bookshelves, you need a place to store your precious hoard. Those babies won’t stand up on their own. Here’s one option:

gifts for book lovers - bookends
Via theliterarygiftcompany.com

 

6. Library set

The only thing worse than not being able to show off your bookshelves, is showing off your bookshelves and having someone say: ‘Oo, could I borrow that?’ If you can’t get away with telling that person to ‘eff off’, this cute little library kit will at least put an end to all lending woes.  

gifts for book lovers - library kit
Via booklovergifts.com

 

7. Bookmarks

We’ll mark our page with anything. A ribbon, a receipt, our beloved pet (not really.) We also have an enormous collection of bookmarks and can quite easily concoct an excuse a reason for another… like this beautiful feather bookmark:

gifts for book lovers - feather bookmark
Via notonthehighstreet.com

 

8. Book List Journal

Maybe you’ve never heard of Goodreads, or perhaps you have but you simply love (or prefer) the act of handwriting in a journal (I get it). This journal is specifically for book lists: books you’ve read, by genre, by favourites, favourite spots to read… and so on. It’s a lovely way to document your reading history offline, if you’re into that. 

gifts for book lovers - literary listography journal
Via Amazon UK

 

9. Kindle Paperwhite

Whether you’re aboard the electronic book train or not, this version of the Kindle is a beauty. Just LOOK AT IT. It’s practically a REAL book. Only without the weight and WITH a built-in nightlight. Add in a subscription to Kindle Unlimited and you’re golden.

gifts for book lovers - kindle paperwhite
Via Amazon UK

 

10. Finally, More Books. Duh.

There’s no such thing as too many books. If all else fails and you’ve reached the end of your Christmas shopping rope, get a hold of their To-Read list and have at it. Here’s mine.  You know, just in case. (Wink-wink.) 

 

Happy holidays!

SMOKE IN THE ROOM BY EMILY MAGUIRE

Genre: CONTEMPORARY | Pages: 289

My rating: ★★★

Adam is lost in grief for his dead wife. Graeme is lost to despair for a world that can’t be fixed. And Katie is lost to depression. That’s a lot of hopelessness in one tiny Australian flat. Nevertheless, that despair is what made Smoke in the Room a compelling read.

I read Emily Maguire’s earlier novel,Taming the Beast, and fell in love with the gritty style of prose and her flawed central characters.

This one… it’s a good read. There’s a lot of truth in it and the characters, after a grotesque amount of binge drinking, gratuitous sex, and eating out of the trash, eventually (mostly) stumble their way into the light.

Katie, the main character, is as flawed as Taming the Beast’s protagonist. She’s a spirited young woman with an insightful (though bleak) view of the world but it took too long to see her fragility. Of course, she is troubled; it’s plain to see, but the initial lack of warmth in Katie’s character meant that I’d read over a third of the book before even liking her.

That said, after the slightly cold (but ridiculously intriguing) start, Katie’s vulnerability is slashed wide open. THIS I could connect with, relate to, and understand. I MARVELLED at the word-perfect emotion behind these characters as each of them faced their demons. The depiction of mental illness is so accurate it bites, and the blissful illusion of suicide is perfectly portrayed.

The book is gritty and edgy; the theme is dark and quite unforgiving. But once the wounds of these characters crack open, it is impossible to pause their story.

‘…depressed people are the ones with the realistic view of the world. It’s the rest of you that have filters. Soft filters that make everything seem nicer and easier than it really is. Maybe that’s all depression really is: life without a filter.’

 


smoke in the room book cover

 

The searing new novel from the internationally-acclaimed author of Taming the Beast, The Gospel According to Luke and Princesses & Pornstars. Summer, Sydney, and holed up in a tiny flat off Broadway are idealistic American Adam, weary activist Graeme, and wild, misunderstood Katie. Each is searching for answers to life’s biggest questions – why are we here; what is love; what constitutes betrayal – and thrust together, over an intense two-week period, they begin to form answers. In doing so, they must first confront their darkest demons, both within and without… Provocative, honest, brimming with sexual tension and crackling with intelligence, Emily Maguire’s sensational new novel cements her place as one of Australia’s hottest young talents.

 

One of These Things First by Steven Gaines

genre: MEMOIR | pages: 272

My rating: ★★★★

Disclaimer: I received a free review copy of this book from the publisher. All opinions are my own.

Memoirs have never been a favourite of mine, so I went into One of These Things First expecting a somewhat tedious time. As it turns out, Steven Gaines’ story and writing style both fascinated and moved me.

‘I saw him fleetingly, no more than a slow camera pan as he passed in and out of frame, but I knew him so intimately from that moment that I can still smell the sun on the nape of his neck.’

It is a poignant and fairly dark read but with enough humour to offer a change a pace. The book has been compared to Girl, Interrupted   although Girl was far darker and more intense than this.

The book is fairly short but the story itself spans much of the author’s life, with the central focus on his fifteen-year-old self, leading up to, and during, his time at a psychiatric clinic. His struggle with who he is and how he is perceived is nothing short of heartbreaking.

The tone of the book is conversational as he recounts his memories and experience, but with such acute attention to detail that it makes even the mundane seem interesting. It is written in such a way that his interest, mild obsession even, with Mr Halliday or Mary, becomes infectious. And I love how his description of the people in his world conjures a vivid image in the mind.

One of These Things First is a story that I’m sure took a massive amount of courage to write. Acceptance among family, communities, or within general society is difficult, especially at the time these events took place. Self-acceptance is often a doubly hard, never-ending battle, and I’m glad there is a hint of it at the end.

‘There were women I loved, but not completely. No matter how wonderful the women I romanced were, I was driven by nature and design to love a man more.’

 

one of these things first book cover

 

In March of 1962, the author, who was fifteen-years-old, managed to “escape the hawk-eyed scrutiny” of three saleswomen in whose care he’d been left, went to the back of his grandfather’s store, punched the glass pane out of a window and sawed his wrists and forearms on the shards of glass remaining in the frame. Narrowly avoiding death, he was hospitalised and, on the brink of being committed to a state hospital, begged his grandfather to bankroll a stay at the exclusive, private posh Payne Whitney located on Manhattan’s upper eastside. With self-confessed delusions of grandeur, Gaines, as a patient, comes to understand that his homosexuality is the underlying cause of his suicide attempt. While he undertakes conversion therapy with a young psychiatrist, he becomes the willing apprentices of various celebrities who are also patients at the hospital. With a rare mix of poignancy and humour, Gaines shows an uncanny ability to conjure up a rollicking narrative woven with great moments of insight, separating himself from other memoirists by his sheer ability to tell a story.

You Are Mine by Janeal Falor

Genre: Fantasy, ya | Pages: 370

My rating: ★★★★

You Are Mine is an engaging read with some interesting themes. Alongside the slow-burning (my favourite kind) romantic sub-plot, the central theme in this book is discrimination: of women, race, social status, even magical ability.

Set in a fantasy world within a time setting where the novelty of electricity is yet to wear thin, the protagonist begins her tale with a blood test with a difference. If her blood is potently magical, she will marry ‘well’ under an arrangement by her father, taking the traditional giving away of the bride to new extremes, with women traded from one man to another like cattle. Despite possessing magic, women have no worldly power—their only purpose in life is procreation and obedience.

When Serena’s original arranged marriage is upended, she is betrothed to another—an Envadi, Zade, native of the rumoured Barbarian race. His culture and his display of rare kindness and free will gives Serena a new lease of life, and she slowly begins to realise that the only barbarians in her world are men like her father.

I enjoyed Serena’s development as she progressed from a naive and fearful girl to a confident woman. Despite being strong for her siblings, oppression has taken its toll, leaving her mistrusting, often submissive, and in constant fear of men and the threat of punishment. 

The supposed crimes for which women are being reprimanded are as extreme as the punishments themselves, and the society in this world is outrageous. Yet, the concepts throughout the story—slavery, racism, oppression—are rooted in real world history. I loved the overall theme, particularly since we get to see Serena stand her own against everything.

This is part of a series, one book for every sister in Serena’s family. Had there been a follow up in her POV I’d have been inclined to get it. As a standalone novel, the story is immersive and the ending, despite falling a little short in terms of the romantic element, is still, overall, satisfying.

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you are mine book cover

Serena knows a few simple things. She will always be owned by a warlock. She will never have freedom. She will always do what her warlock wishes, regardless of how inane, frivolous, or cruel it is. And if she doesn’t follow the rules, she will be tarnished. Spelled to be bald, inked, and barren for the rest of her life—worth less than the shadow she casts.

Then her ownership is won by a barbarian from another country. With the uncertainty that comes from belonging to a new warlock, Serena questions if being tarnished is really worse than being owned by a barbarian, and tempts fate by breaking the rules. When he looks the other way instead of punishing her, she discovers a new world. The more she ventures into the forbidden, the more she learns of love and a freedom just out of reach. Serena longs for both. But in a society where women are only ever property, hoping for more could be deadly.

The Tied Man by Tabitha McGowan

genre: dark, erotica, romance | pages: 395

My rating: ★★★★

The Tied Man is one of those books that whilst reading it I couldn’t seem to get enough, yet when I’m done, I’m left wondering why I would voluntarily traumatise myself. It was a good read—but understand that by good, I mean that while it has a gripping storyline, this book will plaster images on the back of your eyelids that will never ever rub off.

The plot centres around Lilith and Finn. Lilith whilst busy going about her (pretty enviable) artist’s existence, is cornered into a situation beyond comprehension: a long ‘vacation’ at an estate that caters to the whims of the most twisted sexual deviants I’ve ever come across.

That’s nothing, I hear you say.

Wait for it…

That’s not the part which set my mind boggling.

One of the live-in residents is a handsome but tragic Irishman. Finn. He is nothing short of a sex slave—used, abused, punished, and tortured, all under the questionable ‘contract’ he has with the estate owner, Blaine, and her many dubious clients.

I know, I know! Mentions of sex contracts these days brings forth images of Christian Grey and his whip, but Fifty Shades is like reading Enid Blyton compared to this book; and although the second Fifty Shades book (yes, shut up, I read all three) gets a little meatier in terms of actual plot (emphasis on little), The Tied Man outdoes this by a mile. Maybe five.

If this all sounds a bit far-fetched, don’t let it put you off. The plot is by no means thin, and these bizarre events have relatable circumstances. Firstly, Finn didn’t sign the contract for fun; there’s a legitimate and noble reason why he did. Secondly, Lilith didn’t just go along for the ride; she’s almost as trapped as Finn is, first because of Blaine, and then by her own unwillingness to give up on Finn. Lastly, the impressive writing and engaging protagonists keep the plot grounded, immersing the reader into the characters’ world.

I’ve read some spectacularly questionable stories before and I’m not easily shocked or repelled, and I’m definitely not easily offended by books, but this one… This one made even the likes of my warped mind cower in the corner—trembling. Yet, I’d recommend it to anyone who might enjoy torturing themselves with dark, twisted tales (fans of Comfort Food, Flawed, etc.)

I gobbled word after word, scene after gory scene because at the heart of this disturbing story there is a nugget of beauty—HOPE.

‘The momentary discomfort was nothing at all compared to the realisation that she was finding refuge in my flawed embrace.’ — Finn

 

the tied man book cover

 

Lilith Bresson, an independent, successful young artist, is forced to travel from her home in Spain to the wild borderlands of northern England, to repay her feckless father’s latest debt by painting a portrait of the enigmatic Lady Blaine Albermarle.

On her first night at Albermarle Hall she meets Finn Strachan, Blaine’s ‘companion’, a cultured and hauntingly beautiful young man who seems to have it all. But Lilith has an artist’s eye, and a gift for seeing what lies beneath the skin. She soon discovers that Blaine is more gaoler than lover, and if the price is right, depravity has no limits. As the weeks pass, Lilith finds that she too is drawn into the malign web that her patron has spun, yet against the odds she forges a strong friendship with the damaged, dysfunctional Finn. In a dark, modern twist to an age-old story, Lilith Bresson proves that sometimes it’s the princess who needs to become the rescuer.

Please note that this storyline contains depictions of drug abuse, violence and non-consensual sex.

Uprooted by Naomi Novik

GENRE: FANTASY | PAGES: 448

My rating: ★★★★★

Uprooted was the perfect blend of fantasy and fairy tale. I loved it. The story begins with the brief history of the routine taking of a girl by the Dragon. Agnieszka eventually meets him, and under the flimsy rumours of all the village and all the taken girls before her, believes she should fear for her life and her virtue.

Our Dragon doesn’t eat the girls he takes, no matter what stories they tell outside our valley.

Instead, what awaits her is magic. She possesses it and so does the Dragon, and as she settles into her role as apprentice, she learns that the real danger is the Wood—a living breathing entity which threatens her life and the lives of everyone in her village. The Dragon is a protector but so focused on the task he’s been given, he has, in his immortal existence, become cold and distant. Little by little, Agnieszka breaks down the Dragon’s walls and learns to embrace her power instead of fearing it.

The story has been likened to a loose retelling of Beauty and The Beast, and I can see the resemblance there in the most basic of elements–it was this that initially appealed to me–but this book goes above and beyond the fairy tale.

The magic in this book is beautiful. The element of it is brought to life with wondrous detail, steeped in the essence of the entire novel: nature. Nature and magic are fully intertwined; even spells are demonstrated as the growth of nature–an intricate blossoming of a flower or a ferocious eruption of moss and decay–the description is vivid and imaginative.

Agnieszka begins her journey as a fearful, cautious girl, reluctant to step into the spotlight. When she embraces who she truly is, she shows great strength–a wilful, stubborn bravery, and a tender understanding toward the often arrogant Dragon.

Her relationship with him is believable, realistically and beautifully written, evolving first into mutual respect and trust, struggling with their own misgivings before fully embracing and accepting their inevitable love.

This is one of the best books I’ve read this year and my only disappointment is that it is not part of a series—I would gladly jump back into this fascinating, beautiful world.
 

 uprooted book cover

Agnieszka loves her valley home, her quiet village, the forests and the bright shining river. But the corrupted Wood stands on the border, full of malevolent power, and its shadow lies over her life. Her people rely on the cold, driven wizard known only as the Dragon to keep its powers at bay. But he demands a terrible price for his help: one young woman handed over to serve him for ten years, a fate almost as terrible as falling to the Wood.

The next choosing is fast approaching, and Agnieszka is afraid. She knows – everyone knows – that the Dragon will take Kasia: beautiful, graceful, brave Kasia, all the things Agnieszka isn’t, and her dearest friend in the world. And there is no way to save her. But Agnieszka fears the wrong things. For when the Dragon comes, it is not Kasia he will choose.

From the author of the Temeraire series comes this hugely imaginative, engrossing and vivid fantasy novel, inspired by folk and fairy tales. It is perfect reading for fans of Robin Hobb and Trudi Canavan.

GIRL ON A TRAIN BY A. J. WAINES

GENRE: SUSPENSE | PAGES: 435

My rating: ★★★★

Usually, if I say I bought a book by mistake, it’s because I’m telling my husband the not-so-believable tale of how my card liberated itself from my purse and threw itself at the mercy of the checkout at Waterstones. In this case, with Girl on a Train, it’s not a fib. I really did buy it by mistake. I’m THAT stupid. I thought it was the OTHER book about—get this—another girl on another train. Damn public transport.

My own stupidity aside, I wasn’t disappointed.

The story is great; full of suspense and mystery, with intriguing characters in the form of Anna and Elly, and a whodunit that masked itself until the very end. Yet, it is the imagery in this book which stands out by a mile. I’m not usually the biggest fan of description, but it was done so well here. It tackled perfectly the tricky matter of relaying painstakingly precise detail with as few words as possible, and the result is a vivid, image-ridden experience, plonking me directly into the growing obsession and heartache of the main character, Anna, and her connection to Elly.

My only gripe is that the pacing was the tiniest fraction too slow for my liking, with perhaps one or two metaphors too many, a distraction from the otherwise engaging story. Then again, that might just be my own impatience.

Overall, a great read, and a happy ‘mistake’.
 

 girl on a train book cover

Everything points to suicide – but I saw her face… Headstrong Journalist, Anna Rothman, knows what suicide looks like – her own husband killed himself five years earlier. When Elly Swift, an agitated passenger beside her on a train, leaves a locket in Anna’s bag before jumping onto the tracks, Anna starts asking awkward questions. But everything points to suicide and the police close the case.

Anna, however, believes Elly’s fears for Toby, her young nephew, missing since being snatched from St Stephen’s church six months ago, fail to explain the true reason behind Elly’s distress. Through a series of hidden messages Elly left behind, Anna embarks on a dangerous crusade to track down Toby and find Elly’s killer.

But nothing is as it seems and Anna opens a can of worms that throws into question even her own husband’s suicide – before the threads of the mystery converge in an astonishing conclusion.

BOUND BY FLAMES BY JEANIENE FROST

GENRE: PARANORMAL, FANTASY, ROMANCE | PAGES: 342

My rating: ★★★★★

As predicted, book three of the Night Prince series doesn’t disappoint. Who knew I was clairvoyant? Or maybe, Jeaniene Frost is just that good. Bound by Flames is brilliant.

Leila is even tougher than I gave her credit for, and she continues to impress me with her resilience, even though the villain is evil personified and events take a far darker, more twisted turn than before.

“Have you ever seen an animal skinned?” Vlad interrupted, his voice icily pleasant. “It’s a bloody, brutal business under normal circumstances, but imagine if the animal were alive and screaming. Then imagine that it wasn’t an animal, but the person you loved being repeatedly slashed and hacked so that their skin could be ripped away faster than it could heal.”

And it gets worse!

These horrific acts trigger the madman in Vlad, and every scene is riddled with tension. This is then brilliantly balanced with his openness later on, and with Leila, he finally tears down those last few walls. Any misgivings regarding Vlad (not that I have any) are finally rectified when he relays (in detail this time) the atrocities of his past, and it becomes even more apparent that his (ironically) cold exterior, and his arrogant and (at times) downright medieval attitude, all stem from not only his past but his most basic need to protect. There are many more moments where his vulnerability streaks through, and it’s beautiful, and yet his power in this book is phenomenal.

Some of my anger drained away as I stared into his eyes. They were green with fury, yes, but something else lurked in them. An emotion I rarely saw in Vlad. Fear.

“You aren’t just my weakness, Leila. You are my destruction, because if I were to lose you, it would finish me.”

Needless to say, I am a fangirling mess right now, since book four isn’t out until October.

Is it October yet?

vlad
 

bound by flames book cover

Play with fire, pay the price.

Leila’s years on the carnie circuit were certainly an education. What she didn’t learn: how to be a vampire, or how to be married to the most famous vampire of them all. Adjusting to both has Leila teetering on a knife edge between passion and peril, and now the real danger is about to begin…

Vlad must battle with a centuries-old enemy whose reach stretches across continents and whose strength equals his own. It isn’t like Vlad to feel fear, but he does…for Leila, because his enemy knows she is Vlad’s greatest weakness. As friend and foe alike align against him—and his overprotectiveness drives Leila away—Vlad’s love for his new bride could be the very thing that dooms them both…

TWICE TEMPTED BY JEANIENE FROST

GENRE: PARANORMAL, FANTASY, ROMANCE | PAGES: 360

My rating: ★★★★

So. Good. Whilst Twice Tempted is not as action-packed in terms of vampire ass-kicking, there’s a strong build-up of anticipation, particularly in the first half of this book. There were some slow moments in this one, lulls which weren’t present in the first in the series, but they were few and far between, and didn’t for a minute detract from the enjoyment of the story.

Leila’s strength comes through in this second book even more than the first, and her independence and assertiveness is admirable and refreshing to read. She might be more accepting of Vlad than that which is humanly possible, but somehow it’s believable. Again, the complexity of Vlad’s character and Leila’s own apparent thirst for revenge helps her to understand him in a way no other woman has before, and in this book, she sees so much more of what makes him who he is—the good, and the very, very bad.

Vlad doesn’t fail to excite, and as more of his horrific past is unveiled, his depth becomes more and more appealing.

His smile was tantalizing and frightening, like being whipped and finding out you enjoyed the pain.

As ruler, he is one shade shy of psychopathic and yet, underneath the brutality of his actions against his enemies, lies unwavering loyalty to those who follow him. And now, underneath his experience of century-sweeping loss, his love for Leila is a force onto itself, despite the fact that he believes she loves only a fraction of the man he really is.

“You claim to love me, but the man you love doesn’t exist.”

As a couple, their relationship has similar dynamics to Night Huntress Cat and Bones, (particularly when it comes to over-protection and jealousy—that’s vampires for you) but there’s not enough of it yet to even begin to scratch the surface of Cat and Bones’ chemistry. I’m hopeful though, since Vlad, for me, blows Bones right out of the water, and that’s not easily done. Vlad’s intensity—his energy—is unrivaled.

Overall, I’m thrilled by the whole series so far. Book three is lined up and waiting, and I have a feeling it won’t disappoint.

description

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 Twice Tempted

 

Dating the Prince of Darkness has its challenges…

Leila’s psychic abilities have been failing her, and now she isn’t sure what the future holds. If that weren’t enough, her lover, Vlad, has been acting distant. Though Leila is a mere mortal, she’s also a modern woman who refuses to accept the cold shoulder treatment forever–especially from the darkly handsome vampire who still won’t admit that he loves her.

Like choosing between eternal love and a loveless eternity…

Soon circumstances send Leila back to the carnival circuit, where tragedy strikes. And when she finds herself in the crosshairs of a killer who may be closer than she realizes, Leila must decide who to trust– the fiery vampire who arouses her passions like no other or the tortured knight who longs to be more than a friend? With danger stalking her every step of the way, all it takes is one wrong move to damn her for eternity.

ONCE BURNED BY JEANIENE FROST

GENRE: PARANORMAL, FANTASY, ROMANCE | PAGES: 346

My rating: ★★★★

Jeaniene Frost   has done it again, by which I mean written something that consumes me to the point of not sleeping, and ultimately, has me drooling all over the Kindle Store for the next book in the series. Once Burned was a riveting read, from start to finish, and despite the fact that I missed the Night Huntress   element in the beginning, it didn’t take me long to form an attachment to Leila. She’s no Cat (because come on, Cat rocks!) but Leila has the same headstrong, feisty qualities I’ve come to expect from Frost’s protagonists, and she definitely delivers. Even more satisfying, we get to see Leila’s inner strength and resilience develop throughout the book.

And did I mention Vlad? As in Vlad the Impaler, the original prince of darkness. The ultimate vampire, Dracul—with benefits.

vladtepeshnightprince

And he’s no brooder. I love me some of that angst and broodiness, but Vlad takes the game to a whole new level. He’s the opposite of broody. He doesn’t sit around pining over his lost humanity. He revels in it. And it’s freakin’ glorious. Something about the way he owns his vampirism, his abilities, and his power, it takes masculinity to new heights. And yet, there’s a softer side. He keeps it on a short leash but it’s there, and it has Leila (and me) yearning to crack his exterior. Not too much though, obviously, because who wants domesticity from a vampire, right?

Vlad trumps Bones in this series, and that’s saying a lot because Bones has been my go-to vamp for many a fantasy! He’s Buffy’s Spike and Vampire Diaries’ Damon Salvatore rolled into one. But with Vlad… His complex personality is nothing short of schizophrenic. He’s complicated and multi-faceted to the point of frustration, but it lends intrigue and fascination. You can’t help but want to dig deeper and overlook the monstrosities of some of his actions. (Which doesn’t say a lot about me, but hey, I’m human. It’s my job to get lost in the grey area, particularly if there’s a vampire in it.)

Bottom line: this book is exciting, every bit as exciting as the NH series, and I cannot get a copy of book two fast enough. 

 

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 Once Burned

 

She’s a mortal with dark powers…

After a tragic accident scarred her body and destroyed her dreams, Leila never imagined that the worst was still to come: terrifying powers that let her channel electricity and learn a person’s darkest secrets through a single touch. Leila is doomed to a life of solitude…until creatures of the night kidnap her, forcing her to reach out with a telepathic distress call to the world’s most infamous vampire…

He’s the Prince of Night…

Vlad Tepesh inspired the greatest vampire legend of all—but whatever you do, don’t call him Dracula. Vlad’s ability to control fire makes him one of the most feared vampires in existence, but his enemies have found a new weapon against him—a beautiful mortal with powers to match his own. When Vlad and Leila meet, however, passion ignites between them, threatening to consume them both. It will take everything that they are to stop an enemy intent on bringing them down in flames.

ON WRITING BY STEPHEN KING

GENRE: MEMOIR | PAGES: 367

My rating: ★★★★

Stephen King   has the writer’s toolbox of tips to end all toolboxes, all tips, and then some. He doesn’t offer the vague and generic bullsh*t like most how-to books do. Instead, On Writing is packed with insightful, and more importantly, practical guidelines on how to improve your writing craft. He doesn’t beat around the bush, he doesn’t sugarcoat sh*t; what he does is gives it to you straight, and he insists that as a writer, you should be aiming to do the same for your readers. The theme of faithful storytelling, of truth, runs through this book and all of the advice therein. As far as storytelling is concerned, there is no black and white—only story—and it is the writer’s job to tell it.

This book is one of those books you wish you’d read ten years ago. There are moments in here where you read something and think: ‘Holy crap! I do that!’, and for a second, it occurs to you that you must be doing something right, if only because it’s happened to Stephen bloody King. And if that doesn’t get you going, there’s this:

“Amateurs sit and wait for inspiration, the rest of us just get up and go to work.”

That’s the kick up the a** we ALL need, right?

On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft has become my dog-earred, thumbed-to-death reference/guidebook/bible. I haven’t read this just once—I’ve read multiple passages a thousand times over—and I doubt there will ever be another book on writing worthy enough to replace it. If there’s just ONE book you read on the craft, make it this one.

Needless to say, Stephen King has a new worshipping fan to add to his sky-high haystack. That dude rocks. (Now I just wish I had the balls to read his fiction. One day… *determined head-bob*)

“So okay—there you are in your room with the shade down and the door shut and the plug pulled out of the base of the telephone. You’ve blown up your TV and committed yourself to a thousand words a day, come hell or high water. Now comes the big question: What are you going to write about? And the equally big answer: Anything you damn well want.”
—Stephen King

 

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 On Writing Stephen King book cover

 

On Writing: A Memoir is an autobiography and writing guide by Stephen King, published in 2000. It is a book about the prolific author’s experiences as a writer. Although he discusses several of his books, one doesn’t need to have read them or even be familiar with them to read On Writing.

How to Write a Novel by Nathan Bransford

GENRE: NON FICTION | PAGES: 236

My rating: ★★★★

How to Write a Novel: 47 Rules for Writing a Stupendously Awesome Novel That You Will Love Forever is a no-introductions-necessary guide to (… wait for it…) writing a novel; a frill-less, uncluttered collection of straightforward tips and advice on the entire process of book-writing. From the beginnings of that record-breaking awesome idea that just popped into your writerly brain in the shower—right through to the air-punching end when you’re too glad to rid yourself off the stupid sleep-stealing, sanity-crushing THING posing as a would-be book. (Love. Hate. Thin line.)

‘Writing is not always fun. It shouldn’t always be fun. You’re not doing it because it’s always fun. The only reason to write a novel is because you have some insane fire burning inside that years of therapy have been unable to extinguish, and you fear how disappointed you will be with yourself if you never do it. Or, you know, because you really, really want to do it. You have to want it. You have to work at it.’
Nathan Bransford

Nathan Bransford‘s blog has been a writing bible of sorts to me since first stumbling across it. So the idea of THIS? A whole BOOK that combines his stellar advice and humour in a writerly collection of rules? 

Yes, please!

Whether you’re merely entertaining the idea of starting to write (you fool!), or you’re already off and running (I don’t hate you, I promise), this book is a happy, helpful must-read.

I’m presently coming to the end of the Revision Fatigue zone of my long one-book journey, (otherwise known as Rewriting Chapter One #792), but having read How to Write a Novel, it’s comforting to know that everything up to this point in my journey is, as far being as a writer is concerned, completely normal. Even the ‘borderline psychopathy’. 

Just kidding…

(I’m not kidding.)

‘There will come a time in the course of writing a novel where you would rather rip off your toenails and light them on fire than write one more word. This is normal.’Nathan Bransford

Bottom line:
If you are a writer…
If you want to be a writer…
If you used to be a writer, but your half-formed manuscript tortured you into the pits of despair…
this book is for you.

It offers up a plethora of insightful information, and honest, useful, realistic advice. This is easily one of my favourite books on the craft, and with good reason. 

 

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How to Write a Novel

 

The most important thing to know about writing a novel is this: You can do it. And if you’ve already written one, you can write an even better one. Author and former literary agent Nathan Bransford shares his secrets for creating killer plots, fleshing out your first ideas, crafting compelling characters, and staying sane in the process. Read the guide that New York Times bestselling author Ransom Riggs called “The best how-to-write-a-novel book I’ve read.

Sky Song by Sharon Sant

GENRE: FANTASY, PARANORMAL | PAGES: 170

My rating: ★★

I hate giving two-star ratings but compared to others I’ve reviewed as 3-star, Sky Song just didn’t work for me. It was written well enough, and some parts were original and inventive. The rest, at least for me, lacked flow, pacing, and character depth. I found it hard to connect with the main three characters, and despite having an intriguing storyline, I could not immerse myself within it. That said, it was intriguing enough to keep me reading until the end, so don’t be put off until you’ve tried it yourself.

 

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A strange-eyed boy with no memory of his true identity or real parents, Jacob could have no idea of the mortal danger he has been in every day of his fifteen years. Now that danger has found him and suddenly he doesn’t know who he can trust and what is real anymore. All he knows is that his new identity is almost as terrifying as the peril unleashing it has brought. Caught in the universal power struggle of an ancient race of beings and a destiny demanded of him that he does not want, he must fight to protect his own life and everyone he holds dear. But when the time comes, will he be strong enough to make the sacrifices that saving them will demand?

Eve: The Awakening (Eve, #1) by Jenna Moreci

GENRE: FANTASY, PARANORMAL | PAGES: 547

My rating: ★★★★

Eve: The Awakening is the debut novel from Jenna Moreci, and it is a HELL of a debut. The story follows the titular Eve, an advanced subspecies of humans named after the Greek chimeras. Eve has grown up an orphan after the cataclysmic death of her parents, sparking both her gift of telekinesis and the beginning of a lifelong battle to survive. Since the age of eight, she has braved her way through infamy, ridicule, bullying, and death threats, all whilst learning to control her gift, and dealing with the hardships of being an outcast—and then, just as she thinks she’s found a way to lead a normal life, in step a bazillion freaking aliens: Interlopers. Slimy, toothy, winged, giant-ass aliens all of whom are hell-bent on turning the human race against Eve and her kind, and then doing the world the ‘grand favour’ of eliminating chimeras in the goriest possible way.

And this, is the joy-ride that is Eve: The Awakening.

The writing is superbly paced; it gallops through the story, high on adrenaline, crafting scenes of heart-pounding tension and unimaginable gore. If though, you think this is the only thing it has going for it, you’re terribly wrong—the book is laced with humour, upbeat drama, chemistry, and ultimately—the gem of every great book—it is littered with countless moments of raw emotion (no, I’m not crying—there’s something in my eye). The characters are well-rounded, and fully developed, each so very individual, and I won’t attempt to sum them up here, as I cannot do them justice, but the ensemble of personalities and quirks are brilliant, and Eve, the protagonist, is as complex as they come. Through her, the book touches on broader themes such as discrimination and oppression, adding yet another layer of depth to the story.

I thoroughly enjoyed this from start to finish; the book has a compelling beginning, and though it slows in early chapters as we’re discovering Eve’s world, it isn’t long before we’re hurtling through the story again at chimera speed.

The only downside, as far as I can see, is that book two of this dynamic (see what I did there?) series isn’t yet available.

This is honestly the best book I’ve read since Jeaniene Frost‘s Night Huntress series (Halfway to the Grave), and I’d urge anyone to check out EVE, even if (like me) you’re not a hard-core fan of the sci-fi genre. EVE easily straddles several genres at once, and as well as being entertaining, moving, and all-around excellent writing, I’d recommend this regardless, if only to introduce you to the fabulous-ness that is Percy! Best. Character. Ever.

Seriously—read it. 

 

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Eve: The Awakening

 

Eve is an outcast. A chimera.
After years of abuse and rejection, 19-year-old Evelyn Kingston is ready for a fresh start in a new city, where no one knows her name. The esteemed Billington University in sunny Southern California seems like the perfect place to reinvent herself—to live the life of an ordinary human.

But things at Billington aren’t as they seem. In a school filled with prodigies, socialites, and the leaders of tomorrow, Eve finds that the complex social hierarchy makes passing as a human much harder than she had anticipated. Even worse, Billington is harboring a secret of its own: Interlopers have infiltrated the university, and their sinister plans are targeted at chimeras—like Eve.

Instantly, Eve’s new life takes a drastic turn. In a time filled with chaos, is the world focusing on the wrong enemy? And when the situation at Billington shifts from hostile to dangerous, will Eve remain in the shadows, or rise up and fight?

Witch Song by Amber Argyle

GENRE: FANTASY, PARANORMAL, ROMANCE, YA | PAGES: 305

My rating: ★★★★

I read a lot of YA novels, and the beginning stages of this one made me believe it was too specifically aimed at a more teenage demographic. The early chapters seemed juvenile in part and lacked depth. I nearly abandoned it.

I’m so glad I didn’t.

The lacklustre start gave way to a host of well-developed main characters, and intriguing secondary characters, set in a wonderful (?)medieval world of magic. The plot has Senna at the centre, the last witch, standing against Espen and her followers to reclaim the witches’ natural power and affinity with nature, and free the rest of her kind. Senna develops from a naive and innocent young girl to a witch with a powerful song, and it is believable and relatable because of the struggles she endures to get there. Through loss and abandonment, she pushes past her fears and insecurities, despite them never fully leaving her. Her insecurity is a flaw which follows her throughout the book, but it is justified, due to her sheltered past, and the ill-treatment she receives as a witch-born.

Witch Song is a beautifully written book, with its magic based on the pagan tradition and style of nature. I’d recommend it to anyone who, like me, finds themselves drawn to books with old witch magic. 

 

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 Witch Song

 

Brusenna is the last.

All the other witches have been captured, their songs stolen and twisted from harmony and growth into chaos and death. She alone must stand against an evil much older and darker than anything she could ever imagine—an evil every witch before her has failed to vanquish.

Brusenna must be the first.

The Girl with All the Gifts by M. R. Carey

GENRE: FANTASY, PARANORMAL, SUSPENSE | PAGES: 

My rating: ★★★★

Dystopian thriller. Zombie apocalypse. Sounds familiar? Yes, I suppose it does. It’s been done, over and over, and I’ve usually steered happily and carefully in the other direction. The Girl with All the Gifts, however, is not one of those books. It is a dystopian thriller, and there are hungry flesh-eating, zonked-out crazies, but then, there’s also Melanie.

Melanie has a unique take on the world in which she lives – her daily life consists of being forcibly strapped to a wheelchair, and manoeuvred between a bare cell and a classroom filled with kids ‘like her’, where she learns Maths and English, and hears of the stories of the past, including Britain’s past: the world as we know it. The country has broken down, fallen into ruin, and Melanie believes that she is one of the lucky few being kept safe inside her ‘home’; safe from the ‘hungries’ outside the base fences.

MILD SPOILER AHEAD…

What she doesn’t know is just how similar she is to the very creatures the fences keep out. She is Test Subject Number One in a desperate last-resorts research program to save the human race, and the world Melanie dreams of beyond those fences are so much farther from her reach than she realises. Despite intentions of those around her, Melanie breaks free and learns, little by little, who and what she is, eventually surpassing the expectations of all who would have her condemned. Her Pandora-like unleashing of ‘gifts’ onto the world is, at its least, a brave and carefully-calculated move to prolong life, and at most, poetic justice for the innocent.

This fresh, new angle on zombies is wonderfully written. Not only does this book open up a closed door into the other side of zombie fiction, but it explores the concepts of a developing child and her bond with those around her. The type of restraint Melanie displays in the face of her most basic, animalistic instinct is usually only ever depicted in tales of true love of the romantic kind; here, the nurturing and unconditional bond shared between Melanie and her teacher, Helen, is akin to that of a mother and child, and it is refreshingly original in this sense.

Overall, if you want to dip your toes into zombie-infested waters, don’t hesitate to try this one: it is thrilling and horrifying, and emotionally heart-wrenching all at once, and best of all, it shouldn’t give you too many nightmares. 

 

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 The Girl with All the Gifts

 

Melanie is a very special girl. Dr. Caldwell calls her “our little genius.”

Every morning, Melanie waits in her cell to be collected for class. When they come for her, Sergeant Parks keeps his gun pointing at her while two of his people strap her into the wheelchair. She thinks they don’t like her. She jokes that she won’t bite, but they don’t laugh.

Melanie loves school. She loves learning about spelling and sums and the world outside the classroom and the children’s cells. She tells her favorite teacher all the things she’ll do when she grows up. Melanie doesn’t know why this makes Miss Justineau look sad.

The Girl with All the Gifts is a sensational thriller, perfect for fans of Stephen King, Justin Cronin, and Neil Gaiman.

Ultraviolet by R. J. Anderson

GENRE: FANTASY, PARANORMAL, ROMANCE, YA | PAGES: 410

My rating: ★★★★

Ultraviolet — beautiful, and poetic, weaves the story of a girl with the phenomenal gift of synesthesia. The writing crackles across the pages and the senses–like sherbet, like fireworks; an emotional explosion of the every-day as we’ve never seen it. Yet, everything Alison encounters with her unique sensory system is so expertly translated onto the page, that her ‘super-power’ becomes relatable. I am in awe of the delicious detail, and the originality, and never have I been more surprised at the direction a book takes. This genre-straddling twist is effortless, quite spell-binding in fact, and I’m certain that no review anywhere could do this book justice without spoiling the ending.

This genre-straddling twist is effortless, quite spell-binding in fact, and I’m certain that no review anywhere could do this book justice without spoiling the ending.

 

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 Ultraviolet

 

Once upon a time there was a girl who was special. This is not her story.

Unless you count the part where I killed her.

Sixteen-year-old Alison has been sectioned in a mental institute for teens, having murdered the most perfect and popular girl at school. But the case is a mystery: no body has been found, and Alison’s condition is proving difficult to diagnose. Alison herself can’t explain what happened: one minute she was fighting with Tori — the next she disintegrated. Into nothing. But that’s impossible. Right?

LOST GIRLS BY CELINA GRACE

GENRE: ROMANCE, SUSPENSE | PAGES: 294

My rating: ★★★

Lost Girls is a slow, but intriguing read, with excellent psychological detail as the story follows Maudie into the depths of her own mind, and the secrets of the past buried there. The plot-twist is double-edged and refreshingly unexpected, and Maudie’s self-development is strong and endearing all at once.

  Lost Girls

 

Twenty three years ago, Maudie Sampson’s childhood friend Jessica disappeared on a family holiday in Cornwall. She was never seen again.

In the present day, Maudie is struggling to come to terms with the death of her wealthy father, her increasingly fragile mental health and a marriage that’s under strain. Slowly, she becomes aware that there is someone following her: a blonde woman in a long black coat with an intense gaze. As the woman begins to infiltrate her life, Maudie realises no one else appears to be able to see her.

Is Maudie losing her mind? Is the woman a figment of her imagination or does she actually exist? Have the sins of the past caught up with Maudie’s present… or is there something even more sinister going on?

Lost Girls is the new novel from the author of The House on Fever Street: a dark and convoluted tale which proves that nothing can be taken for granted and no-one is as they seem.

Up From the Grave (Night Huntress #7) by Jeaniene Frost

GENRE: FANTASY, PARANORMAL, ROMANCE | PAGES: 372

My rating: ★★★★

On finally completing this series with Up From the Grave, I had to hold off writing a review for a couple of days for fear of gushing like the book nerd I am. Yet, several days later, I am still full of nothing but gushing love for Cat and Bones and the Night Huntress world, and I’m having to read two books alongside each other just to fill the gaping book hole left in my soul. (I’m nothing if not dramatic.)

On a more serious note – as if being stuck in book limbo isn’t serious – book seven of this series did not disappoint. There was the usual action, the usual Cat vs. villain scenario (although this villain had his introduction in the previous part), and whilst there aren’t as many toe-curling scenes featuring Bones (aka Buffy’s Spike – yum!) as in previous books (hello, married life), there is that same distinct connection between him and Cat, which by this point has developed and escalated into something altogether more magical than vampire sex. (Did I just say that? I take it back.)

I loved the addition of Katie (even though I could see it coming a mile off), and I liked Cat’s changing instincts surrounding this – it was written in such a way that this transition into her new role was smooth and natural.

Something I did not see coming was this:

SPOILER AHEAD!

“A shock wave knocked me off Bones and sent me sprawling against the other side of the pier. Concussion grenade, I mentally diagnosed. One amped up enough for vampires. Madigan had really upgraded his toys, but before I could scramble back to Bones, I saw something that froze me into immobility. A line appeared in his blood- spattered cheek, dark as pitch and snaking across his skin like a crack in a statue. Then another line appeared, and another one. And another. No. It was the only thought my mind was capable of producing as black lines began to appear all over his skin, zigzagging and splintering off into new, merciless paths. I’d seen the same thing happen to countless vampires before, usually after twisting a silver knife in their hearts, but denial made it impossible for me to believe the same was happening to Bones. He couldn’t be slowly shrivelling before my gaze, true death changing his youthful appearance into something that resembled pottery clay baked too long in an oven. My immobility vanished, replaced by terror such as I’ve never felt. I vaulted across the pier, snatching Bones into my arms while my tears joined the rain in soaking his face. “NO!” Even as the scream left me, the changes in him grew worse. His muscular frame felt like it deflated, the hard lines of his body becoming rubbery before they began to shrink. I clutched him tighter, sobs turning my tears scarlet, while something started to hammer in my chest. It felt as though I were being pummelled on the inside with hard, steady blows. My heartbeat, a part of me registered. It had been silent for almost a year, but now, it pounded more strongly than it ever had when I was a human. Another cry tore out of me when Bones’s skin cracked beneath my hands before sloughing off onto the wooden planks. Frantic, I tried to put it back on, but more flesh began to peel away faster than I could hold it together. Muscle and bone peeked out from those widening spaces, until his face, neck, and arms resembled a gaping slab of meat. But what tore through me like a fire that would never stop burning was his eyes. The dark brown orbs I loved sank into their sockets, dissipating into goo. My scream, high- pitched and agonised, replaced the scrambling sounds of soldiers setting up position around me. I didn’t try to stop them. I sat there, clutching handfuls of what now looked like dried leather, until all I could see underneath Bones’s bullet- riddled clothes was a pale, withered husk. Dimly, I heard Madigan yell, “I said no silver ammo! Who the fuck fired those rounds?” before everything faded except the pain radiating through me. It made the agony I felt when I’d nearly burned to death a blissful memory. That had only destroyed my flesh, but this tore through my soul, taking every emotion and shredding it with knowledge that was too awful to bear. Bones was gone. He’d died right before my eyes because I insisted on taking Madigan down my way.”

If I read this once, I read it at least five more times before I would allow myself to believe it and try to move on. Even then, I was unwilling to let go.

By the time I got to p.149, I was a ridiculous, teary mess. Read the book–you’ll see.

Needless to say, this whole series is on my ‘favourites’ pile. It’s easy reading, feisty, witty, and jam-packed with supernatural action and chemistry. The heroine is strong and sassy, and knows how to handle herself (yay, feminism!), and best of all, these non-sparkling vampires know how to bite.

 

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 Up From the Grave

 

Lately, life has been unnaturally calm for vampires Cat Crawfield and her husband Bones. They should have known better than to relax their guard, because a shocking revelation sends them back into action to stop an all-out war…

A rogue CIA agent is involved in horrifying secret activities that threaten to raise tensions between humans and the undead to dangerous heights. Now Cat and Bones are in a race against time to save their friends from a fate worse than death… because the more secrets they unravel, the deadlier the consequences. And if they fail, their lives—and those of everyone they hold dear — will be hovering on the edge of the grave.

One Grave at a Time (Night Huntress #6) by Jeaniene Frost

GENRE: FANTASY, PARANORMAL, ROMANCE | PAGES: 389

My rating: ★★★★

Whilst book five was slightly disappointing because of a distinct lack of raw connection with Cat and Bones, book six, One Grave at a Time, puts the series back on form.

Once again, Cat and Bones are up against yet another cunning enemy, this time in the form of Kramer – a powerful ghost, disillusioned writer of the historic Malleus Maleficarum, and cruel, twisted rapist and murderer. He has haunted the plane of the living for years, yet annually, on Halloween, he has the ability to cross over into a corporeal form, allowing for his centuries-old ritual of the torture and burning of women, under the archaic system of witch-hunting.

Of all of the villains in this series so far, I enjoyed reading this one the most – perhaps because of my own interests surrounding the witch trials and the unspeakable history of the crimes against those women.

Cat, as always, puts her own (undead) life on the line to hunt down this madman, in yet another lightning joyride from Jeaniene Frost. 

 

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 One Grave at a Time

 

Having narrowly averted an (under)world war, Cat Crawfield wants nothing more than a little downtime with her vampire husband, Bones. Unfortunately, her gift from New Orleans’ voodoo queen just keeps on giving–leading to a personal favor that sends them into battle once again, this time against a villainous spirit.

Centuries ago, Heinrich Kramer was a witch hunter. Now, every All Hallows Eve, he takes physical form to torture innocent women before burning them alive. This year, however, a determined Cat and Bones must risk all to send him back to the other side of eternity–forever. But how do you kill a killer who’s already long dead?

This Side of the Grave (Night Huntress, #5) BY Jeaniene Frost

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance | PAGES: 357

My rating: ★★★

Jeaniene Frost continues to distract me from everything else I should be doing, although I have to admit that part 5 in the series was not as great for me as those before it.

There’s still plenty of action and the writing is superb as always, but unlike the others, this book was a little dull in some places. There are some great scenes, don’t get me wrong, but things don’t seem to pick up until about halfway through. Whether this is simply because of the general plot of this book, or whether it is a reflection of the characters’ developing maturity, I don’t know – perhaps a bit of both – either way, it was slightly disappointing after eating books 1 to 4 like a ravenous book-beast.

I also found myself somewhat distracted by the new additions to the story, in particular, Kira, and Denise’s new ‘situation’. For anyone who read the side novels involving Spade and Denise, and Mencheres and Kira, this wouldn’t be a problem. Maybe it’s my own damn fault for rushing on with this series instead of branching out and getting the full overall story – I just didn’t have enough of an interest in these side characters to read full novels based around them alone. It would have made more sense to read the Night Huntress books 1 to 4, then go to Night Huntress World First Drop of Crimson and Eternal Kiss of Darkness before reading this book as suggested on the author’s site. Oops.

Overall, this won’t stop me from continuing with the series, but I am hoping book six captures more of what drew me to this series in the first place, zoning back in on Cat and Bones.

 

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  This Side of the Grave

 

Danger waits on both sides of the grave.

Half-vampire Cat Crawfield and her vampire husband Bones have fought for their lives, as well as for their relationship. But just when they’ve triumphed over the latest battle, Cat’s new and unexpected abilities threaten to upset a long-standing balance . . .

With the mysterious disappearance of vampires, rumors abound that a species war is brewing. A zealot is inciting tensions between the vampires and ghouls, and if these two powerful groups clash, innocent mortals could become collateral damage. Now Cat and Bones are forced to seek help from a dangerous “ally”; the ghoul queen of New Orleans herself. But the price of her assistance may prove more treacherous than even the threat of a supernatural war . . . to say nothing of the repercussions Cat never imagined.

Destined for an Early Grave (Night Huntress #4) BY Jeaniene Frost 

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance | PAGES: 355 

My rating: ★★★★

After having read several reviews that led me to believe the fourth instalment in this series was less than average, I went into this one partly prepared for disappointment. Happily, it never came. Destined for an Early Grave is just as brilliant, in my opinion, as the previous three books.

**Spoiler Ahead**

Cat and Bones are back on form after book three’s slightly lacking absence of steamy scenarios and chemistry. Cat’s transformation is edgy and original, and full of surprise, and her relationship with Bones is put to the test in even more ways.

Jeaniene Frost has done it again, and this is turning out to be one of my favourite series ever.

 

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  Destined for an Early Grave

 

Her deadly dreams leave her in grave danger.

Since half-vampire Cat Crawfield and her undead lover Bones met six years ago, they’ve fought against the rogue undead, battled a vengeful Master vampire, and pledged their devotion with a blood bond. Now it’s time for a vacation. But their hopes for a perfect Paris holiday are dashed when Cat awakes one night in terror. She’s having visions of a vampire named Gregor who’s more powerful than Bones and has ties to her past that even Cat herself didn’t know about.

Gregor believes Cat is his and he won’t stop until he has her. As the battle begins between the vamp who haunts her nightmares and the one who holds her heart, only Cat can break Gregor’s hold over her. She’ll need all the power she can summon in order to bring down the baddest bloodsucker she’s ever faced . . . even if getting that power will result in an early grave.

Halfway to the Grave BY Jeaniene Frost

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance | PAGES: 358

My rating: ★★★★

EDIT: Having now devoured the series, Halfway to the Grave is the gateway book into one of my favourite paranormal series EVER. 

Catherine – otherwise known as Cat, Cathy and Kitten; also known as a half-breed, with a penchant for killing other vampires after having discovered that she is the product of a vampire rape. With her prejudice against all of the undead fully drummed into her by her mother, and Cat’s own self-loathing of her very being, she hunts the vampires by night, hoping that someday she’ll cross paths with the one whose blood flows through her.

Instead, she finds Bones: master vampire, hundreds of years old, and more than a match for Cat’s skills, he corners her into a deal: she can live, and hunt, but only on his terms, as part of an ongoing eleven-year search of his own.

This book was refreshingly and amazingly jam-packed with action and chemistry.

Cat is strong and feisty; her temperament makes her unpredictable, and her internal narration is funny, sassy, and a real joy to read. Her spunk gets her into dangerous fixes, yet it is truly liberating, in a generation of fragile-humans-in-the-paranormal-world, to see her get herself out of them, for the majority of the time.

Bones, as the male lead is charismatic and charming, keeping all the mystery and danger of everything a vampire should encompass – a little remnant of Buffy’s Spike. His English wit and vampiric allure is pleasurably more-ish, and set against Cat’s own fiery nature, it is a truly exciting combination.

I loved this book immensely. Each character is well established, and the conflicting prejudices of both species – human and vampire – and then the eventual mingling of the two, really adds interest. I admired the way the author does not hold out on the characters’ fitting opinions on topics in society – politics, religion… It is so refreshing to read something that doesn’t hold back in a bid to cause as little offence as possible. This made the characters really come to life; it added realism.

The ending was left wonderfully open, without being frustratingly so, and I just cannot wait to continue with this series – certainly the best so far – in terms of action, romance, humour, sex, and all things supernatural.

 

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  Halfway to the Grave

 

Flirting with the Grave…

Half-vampire Catherine Crawfield is going after the undead with a vengeance, hoping that one of these deadbeats is her father – the one responsible for ruining her mother’s life. Then she’s captured by Bones, a vampire bounty hunter, and is forced into an unholy partnership.

In exchange for finding her father, Cat agrees to train with the sexy night stalker until her battle reflexes are as sharp as his fangs. She’s amazed she doesn’t end up as his dinner – are there actually good vampires? Pretty soon Bones will have her convinced that being half-dead doesn’t have to be all bad. But before she can enjoy her newfound status as kick-ass demon hunter, Cat and Bones are pursued by a group of killers. Now Cat will have to choose a side . . . and Bones is turning out to be as tempting as any man with a heartbeat.

The Complete Peanuts, Vol. 8: 1965-1966 by Charles M. Schulz

GENRE: Graphic Novel / Comic, Humour | PAGES: 323

My rating: ★★★★

peanuts image 1

Peanuts, in a word, is CLASSIC. It really is.

I never tire of it. This is the first full volume I’ve read all the way through, and yet I would happily build my collection of Charles M. Schulz’s work in its entirety.

Snoopy is my personal favourite; loud, obnoxious Lucy a very close second. Honestly though, it’s impossible not to love the whole damn bunch of ’em.

Wit, irony, and Peanuts’ shining glory of presenting – amidst the comedy – real-life issues, all combine to make a world you want to visit again, and again. The stories are clever, cute, rolling-on-floor-laughing, but mostly I find them touching.

Schulz takes all of life’s little lemons, and through the miniature ‘old souls’ that form the Peanut gang, gets us chuckling-drunk on the lemonade.

peanuts image 2

 

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  The Complete Peanuts, Vol. 8

 

We are now in the mid-1960s, one of Schulz’s peak periods of creativity (and one third of the way through the strip’s life!). Snoopy has become the strip’s dominant personality, and this volume marks two milestones for the character: the first of many “dogfights” with the nefarious Red Baron, and the launch of his writing career (“It was a dark and stormy night…”). Two new characters—the first two from outside the strip’s regular little neighborhood—make their bows. Roy (who befriends Charlie Brown and then Linus at summer camp) won’t have a lasting impact, but upon his return from camp he regales a friend of his with tales of the strange kids he met, and she has to go check them out for herself. Her name? “Peppermint” Patty. With an introduction by filmmaker Hal Hartley.

His Witness (Vittorio Crime Family, #4) by Vanessa Waltz

GENRE: Dark, Erotica, Romance | PAGES: 380

My rating: ★★★

His Witness turned out to be a (surprisingly?) good read, full of action and grit, and more than its fair share of sex (to an almost annoying extent). (Hold up, I did say almost.)

I couldn’t connect with Tommy to begin with but he really did grow on me, as details of his introduction into the mob was revealed. Melanie, the lead female was written with sass and strength, although because of this I didn’t buy into the sudden submissiveness of her character as much as I did with other books of this nature.

Having said that perhaps this was the point – she didn’t need to or maybe couldn’t be ‘broken’ because on some level, she’d wanted Tommy all along. She submitted by choice, which given her former predicament, was for her, empowering in its own way.

I’m not a fan of mob/Mafia reads in general so won’t bother checking out any of the other related stories, but as a stand alone, this was a decent way to spend a few afternoons, and the twist at the end was a nice add-in.

The warning on the book is not just for decoration though, so would-be readers: be prepared – not only for the borderline torture BDSM scenes, but also the scenes of mobster violence, which has a disturbing Dexter-like quality.

Hats off to the writer, for making me squirm.

 

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  His Witness (Vittorio Crime Family, #4)

 

He kidnapped me.

He was charming, powerful, intoxicating. Accepting his advances might be the last mistake I’d ever make. He was a dangerous man, and the fact that he made me feel alive couldn’t hide that I danced with death.

I made my choice, and he made his.

Now I’m trapped in his basement, completely at his mercy. Day after day, he toys with me for his own amusement. Pleasure and pain, pain and pleasure. The two have are so linked now that I can barely tell them apart and I’m beginning to crave both.

Worse, I’m beginning to crave him.

One for the Money by Janet Evanovich

GENRE: Humour, Romance, Suspense | PAGES: 290

My rating: ★★★

Stephanie Plum is a brilliantly ‘real’ woman. The scrapes she gets herself into however are something else entirely. It makes for an action packed, fun-filled read. The mystery element is contemporary and intriguing, well thought out, and written even better. Each character in the story is a life force of its own – realistically flawed, sufficiently developed – and after this exciting start to the series, I’ll definitely be checking out the others, and not just for Morelli.

  One for the Money

 

Stephanie Plum is down on her luck. She’s lost her job, her car’s on the brink of repossession, and her apartment is fast becoming furniture-free. Enter Cousin Vinnie, a low-life who runs a bail-bond company. If Stephanie can bring in vice cop turned outlaw Joe Morelli, she stands to pick up $10,000. But tracking down a cop wanted for murder isn’t easy… And when Benito Ramirez, a prize-fighter with more menace than mentality, wants to be her friend Stephanie soon knows what it’s like to be pursued. Unfortunately the best person to protect her just happens to be on the run…

I Take This Woman by S.K. Quinn

GENRE: Suspense | PAGES: 360

My rating: ★★★

I Take This Woman is an excellent book in that it casts a very real and disturbing glimpse into the world of Thai sex-trafficking and trading.

The different perspectives each really adds depth and insight–from that of the well-intended journalist and the misunderstood male partner, to the two step-sisters on opposite ends of the Thai-bride spectrum.

The story was hard-hitting and well-told without being overly graphic, and it ends with hope, which in this case, is sorely needed.

  I Take This Woman

 

Three mail-order brides killed on their first wedding anniversary. A fourth missing bride approaches one year of marriage. One week to find her. Three mail-order brides have turned up dead – exactly one year after their wedding day. All the brides met their husbands at the same place, a marriage agency that offers a catalogue of women for men to buy. Documentary maker, Ruby Philips, is desperate to uncover the truth before another girl is killed. But with only days before the next bride reaches her one-year shelf life, can Ruby find her in time?

Who is Sarah Lawson by K. J. Rabane

GENRE: Suspense | PAGES: 420

My rating: ★★★

Who is Sarah Lawson is enjoyable and intriguing beginning with a woman stepping into her home to find it already occupied by a family who claims she is someone she isn’t. The premise is outrageous but it is handled well enough to suspend disbelief.

The story was well thought out and the characters well developed. The ending, however, felt rushed and anticlimactic, and the grammar errors throughout were frustrating and could have been avoided. That aside, the book could easily have been a four-star read.

 

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  Who is Sarah Lawson

 

How would you feel coming home to find a family living in your house who call you Sarah, tell you your brother’s name is Andy and insist that you should be ashamed of calling the police for help? My name is Rowena Shaw and I’ve never seen any of them before. They are total strangers. It’s Thursday and it’s just the beginning.

Flawed by Kate Avelynn

GENRE: Dark, YA | PAGES: 336

My rating: ★★★★

Dark and disturbing—two words I’d associate with Flawed

Two more words: compelling… captivating.

Whether I’m drawn to this kind of story because of who I am, or whether it is the story itself that pulls me in is, quite frankly, entirely beside the point.

I loved this book. Love seems so wrong a word, given the content of the novel, but there it is: I love it. I ate the words off the page like a rabid animal and I make no apologies for it.

This book, like Tabitha Suzuma’s Forbidden deals with neglect, abuse, and— #OMG —incest.

If the idea of reading about that touchy topic doesn’t make you run for the hills, and you begin the story like the brave reader-adventurer you are, you are already halfway to the point of awe that I’m at, because from the get-go, Sarah, the protagonist, demands to be heard.

Her voice is strong. Even though her situation renders her weak, her inner strength makes you care for her and connect with her.

James, her brother, becomes a hero the moment he sacrifices himself to his father’s violence to save her; and then he saves her again, and again, and again.

It didn’t matter that I already knew what he would morph into; I was so caught up in the tragic events under their unhappy roof, that their pact, their bond—of safety, protection, unity, and love—was seriously all that mattered.

Like Forbidden, when it reached the point of no return, even though you KNOW there is no such thing as a grey area in this, you (or rather, I) find the behaviour… reasonable.

Yes, I damn well said it. Reasonable!

Faced with paternal abuse, neglect, and violence, an abused and otherwise absent mother, a sheltered, fragile, terrifying existence… it doesn’t seem terribly difficult to believe that the lines of love between the two people who find solace and comfort in one another, would begin to blur.

What makes Flawed so much darker however, is that unlike Forbidden, the lines have blurred only on one side—James’.

**Possible Spoilers Ahead**

As her protector, James is fiercely possessive and increasingly controlling. He loves her to a heartbreaking degree, and he wants so badly to fix everything that is wrong in their lives. It comes from a place of love, but having solved everything with his fists from the age of eight has made him volatile, and often almost as dangerous as their father; yet, he never lays a forceful hand on Sarah. At least, not yet.

Sarah struggles with her own feelings for her brother—often confused by certain emotions that pass between them. He became her only source of love and companionship—her protector and her comrade. They have had only each other for a very long time and when she begins to look elsewhere and becomes aware of the oddness of their intimate (though not sexual) relationship, James’ entire sense of self seems to crumble.

Their initial pact as young siblings—never to leave one another—is under threat when Sarah eventually falls for James’ best friend Sam. Sam leads Sarah to doorways she never knew existed; in spending time together, Sarah’s confidence grows, and her eyes seem to open for the first time.

For the first time, she becomes afraid of her brother, who would (and does) do absolutely anything for her, except let her leave or love someone else.

As reasonable as the development of inappropriate emotions is, (in my warped head, at least) there is no excuse or explanation for manipulation, particularly manipulation of a mind as fractured as Sarah’s.

We all know how this will end—yet even then, the author manages to surprise shock.

I have nothing but praise for the entire book; and nothing but admiration for the writer brave enough to tell a story as dark as this one.

Five brilliant stars.

 

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  Flawed

 

Sarah O’Brien is alive because of the pact she and her brother made twelve years ago — James will protect her from their violent father if she promises to never leave him. For years, she’s watched James destroy his life to save hers. If all he asks for in return is her affection, she’ll give it freely.

Until, with a tiny kiss and a broken mind, he asks for more than she can give.

Sam Donavon has been James’ best friend — and the boy Sarah’s had a crush on — for as long as she can remember. As their forbidden relationship deepens, Sarah knows she’s in trouble. Quiet, serious Sam has decided he’s going to save her. Neither of them realizes James is far more unstable than her father ever was, or that he’s not about to let Sarah forget her half of the pact…

A Life Less Broken by Margaret McHeyzer

GENRE: Dark, Romance

My rating: ★★★

A Life Less Broken begins with a warning—an alert for distressing content. Rightly so; there are several scenes throughout this story that made me cringe, and I don’t wince easily.

The sexual violence described is horrific, and the author writes these scenes well; it packs a full punch, not just for the shock factor either.

The author also manages to create a believable space inside the main character’s head—Allyn is tormented on a daily basis, living and reliving everything that happened to her—and I felt as though this was done carefully, and realistically.

This is my praise for the book—this, and the ending (I do love an ending such as this one).

My issues with the book are… oh, man…

To sum it up, I guess my main issue is bloody Dominic.

He’s a nice guy, yes. He’s smart and kind, he’s noble and generous, and he obviously cares for Allyn—just don’t get me started on doctor/patient ethics—but my God, he is NOT funny—boy, doesn’t he try. He is also just a little too…. verbose… but hey, that’s just me, maybe.

If you think Edward Cullen can convince a girl how his every move is gravitated towards her, you ain’t read nothing, yet.

This man is smack-your-head-and-groan OTT in his constant, repetitive, (almost-TOO-supportive), never ending declarations of love and adoration—and he hasn’t got a hundred years of vampirism to blame it on.

I get that he falls for her, that he admires her strength and inner beauty—and that’s wonderful—but as much of a sucker as I am for a good, all-consuming, against-all-odds love story, I could not, for the life of me, get on board with this one and I’ve rooted for some pretty ‘out-there’ couples (think Forbidden ).

For me, and this is just my humble opinion, the connection between Allyn and Dominic seemed too staged. It did not seem to happen naturally enough. It was too quick, too easy, too convenient. For all the brilliant realism in the rest of the book, it (unfortunately) came undone with this. 

Add to that, the ‘squirminess’ (actual scientific term) of replacing Allyn’s crippling fear with the love-crutch of her doctor, and I couldn’t help but notice every flaw.

That said, I still enjoyed it on the whole (disturbing as that seems) and I particularly loved the epilogues—karma and comeuppance: my favourite.

Read it if you like books such as Living Dead Girl,  Such a Pretty Girl, or hey,  Twilight.

P.S. I still love Edward.

 

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 A Life Less Broken

 

On a day like any other, Allyn Sommers went off to work, not knowing that her life was about to be irrevocably and horrifically altered.Three years later, Allyn is still a prisoner in her own home held captive by harrowing fear. Broken and damaged, Allyn seeks help from someone that fate brought her. Dr. Dominic Shriver is a psychiatrist who’s drawn to difficult cases. He must push past his own personal battles to help Allyn fight her monsters and nightmares. Is Dr. Shriver the answer to her healing? Can Allyn overcome the broken? Contains distressing content. Only suitable for 18+. Standalone.

The Seven Devils by Sara Danvers

GENRE: Paranormal, YA | PAGES: 300

My rating: ★★★

The beginning of The Seven Devils is enough to draw the reader in; the tension, the trauma – I was immediately moved by the protagonist.

Then it becomes a bit of a chore. The second quarter of the novel felt rushed and unrealistic (and not in a supernatural way, but rather in terms of the human interaction.) I found it hard to believe that someone suffering from physical and psychological abuse would so easily allow a strange male into her house after having known him for the extent of just one afternoon, regardless of her obvious desperation for connection.

I almost gave up. I almost stopped reading, having become frustrated with this issue, and with the numerous grammatical and typo errors throughout.

And yet, Ellen had hooked me enough in the beginning, for me to continue with her story.

By the time we see Neil for who he truly is, flaws and all, I was rather gripped by his secrets, and their relationship – despite the open and rather frustratingly, lacklustre ending.

Apparently, there will be a book two and whilst I’m not on the edge of my seat with impatience, I do intend to follow up on their journey.

 

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  The Seven Devils

 

After nearly being drowned by her alcoholic father, 17-year-old Ellen, her mother, and her brother move across the state to start over. Ellen soon meets Neil, a gorgeous loner with a bad reputation. Her classmates warn her to stay away, but he seems to be the only one who understands her. Besides, the rumors about Neil are too far-fetched to be believed. When she is threatened by Derrick (a jealous classmate) it becomes clear that there is more to Neil than meets the eye. In this sexy page turner, Ellen must discover Neil’s dark secrets and learn to stand up for herself before the plot hatched against her unfolds.

How to Build a Girl by Caitlin Moran

GENRE: Humour, Romance | PAGES: 357

My rating: ★★★★

How to Build a Girl is Georgia Nicholson meets Bridget Jones with lots of swearing and lots of sex. It’s funny, insightful and engaging and has only reaffirmed my crush for Caitlin Moran’s work.

 

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  How to Build a Girl

 

My name’s Johanna Morrigan. I’m fourteen, and I’ve just decided to kill myself. I don’t really want to die, of course! I just need to kill Johanna, and build a new girl. Dolly Wilde will be everything I want to be, and more! But as with all the best coming-of-age stories, it doesn’t exactly go to plan… A Number One Sunday Times bestseller in hardback and now Number One in paperback, from Caitlin Moran, the award-winning and Sunday Times bestselling author of How to Be a Woman. (Selected by Emma Watson for her feminist book club ‘Our Shared Shelf’)

The Seven Steps to Closure by Donna Joy Usher

GENRE: Romance | PAGES: 410

My rating: ★★★

The Seven Steps to Closure started so slowly for me that I almost gave up on it; thankfully I didn’t. By the time Tara, the protagonist got on that plane to India, I’d completely warmed to her, and when Matt was introduced, things took a delightfully funny and romantic turn, and I couldn’t help but enjoy it. This was a lighthearted and very funny read, particularly handy whilst in ‘book limbo’.

 

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  The Seven Steps to Closure

 

Tara Babcock awakes the morning after her 30th birthday with a hangover that could kill an elephant – and the knowledge she is still no closer to achieving closure on her marriage breakup. Things go from bad to worse when she discovers that, not only is her ex-husband engaged to her cousin – Tash, the woman he left her for – but that Jake is also running for Lord Mayor of Sydney. Desperate to leave the destructive relationship behind and with nothing to lose, she decides- with encouragement from her three best friends – to follow the dubious advice from a magazine article, Closure in Seven Easy Steps. The Seven Steps to Closure follows Tara on her sometimes disastrous- always hilarious – path to achieve the seemingly impossible.

The Hazards of Skinny Dipping (Hazards, #1) by Alyssa Rose Ivy

GENRE: Romance, YA | PAGES: 249

My rating: ★★

The Hazards of Skinny Dipping was an easy read; predictable fluff for the brain on downtime, but nevertheless very enjoyable. The middle section was the best; it was here that the central characters seemed to have more vigour. Apart from this, they could have been fleshed out a bit more. I found Juliet to be overly sensitive, but perhaps this was an intentional flaw. All in all, not the best but not the worst either. The synopsis for the book actually states that it is not claiming to be about deep love or self-discovery and so, to that end, it ‘does what it says on the tin’.

  The Hazards of Skinny Dipping

 

This isn’t a deep book about first loves or self-discovery. If you want a book like that, I’d be happy to recommend one, but I don’t have that kind of story to tell. Instead my story is about rash decisions and finding out that your dream guy is bad in bed. It’s the story of when I finally went skinny dipping, and how my life was never the same again. Oh, and it’s also the story of my freshman year of college and realizing Mr. Right might have been there all along.

The End of Everything by Megan Abbott

GENRE: Contemporary, YA | PAGES: 246

My rating: ★★★★

The End of Everything is beautiful and disturbing all in the same breath! I loved this book. The writing was amazing – it reminded me a bit of Sylvia Plath’s style. There were some sentences I had to re-read just to fully absorb and appreciate the poetry within the prose.

The protagonist’s voice was strong, mature, and surprisingly insightful for a fourteen year old – yet without being too advanced so as to make it unbelievable. The author did a fantastic job of capturing this middle ground.

The story line was amazing – suspenseful and full of intensity throughout.

I can’t fault it in any way.

Simply brilliant!

 

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  The End of Everything

 

A close-knit street, the clink of glass on glass, summer heat. Two girls on the brink of adolescence, throwing cartwheels on the grass. Two girls who tell each other everything. Until one shimmering afternoon, one of them disappears. Lizzie is left with her dread and her loss, and with a fear that won’t let her be. Had Evie tried to give her a hint of what was coming, a clue that she failed to follow? Caught between her imaginary guilt, her sense of betrayal, her own powerful need, and the needs of the adults around her, Lizzie’s voice is as unforgettable as her story is arresting.

Depressive Illness: The Curse Of The Strong by Tim Cantopher

GENRE: Non-Fiction | PAGES: 128

My rating: ★★★★★

I read Depressive Illness: The Curse Of The Strong in bursts. Every time I picked it up, it presented me with a gift. I feel like I’ve done myself a huge favour simply for having read it. The author and doctor, Tim Cantopher, has a brilliant no-nonsense voice, and more to the point, that voice comes from a place of sound understanding.

Never before have I come across something, or someone for that matter, who could sum up this illness in a way that didn’t feel belittling or judgmental. It’s usually one or the other. To be perfectly honest, I’ve never made it past chapter two in any other self-help book for depression. I’ve found them either too patronising or lacking any kind of understanding.

This man, however, this author – I want to write him a damn thank-you letter or something! He really gets it. Really and truly.

“‘Oh, no! It’s Monday morning. I don’t want to get up. It’s too early, the week is too long, I’ve got too much work to do and I need a holiday. I feel so depressed!’

Every Monday morning starts this way and I refuse to rise until I am running late, but after a while I drag myself grumpily out of bed and start my week. I have never been good at Mondays and it takes a while for my mood to pick up through the day. It isn’t that I don’t like my job; I do, very much. It is just that I like rest and recreation even more and on a Monday morning, the next opportunity for these pleasures seems an awfully long way away.

Everyone has suffered spells of low mood of this type at some time or other and some people think that this means everyone has suffered from depression. It doesn’t, or at least, not clinical depression or depressive illness. The truth is that clinical depression is a horrible illness of which most of us, thank goodness, have not the faintest inkling. This is one of the many trials sufferers from the illness have to face: people looking at them knowingly and saying, ‘Oh, yes, I’ve often had that. I find the best thing is just to pull myself together and get busy.’

No, you haven’t, so stop making things worse with your ill-informed advice. If you really want to help, try to understand that sufferer of this illness is going through torment of a pretty awful kind.”

Anyone who has ever suffered from this illness will appreciate the approach of this book. It allows for reflection and it offers up more advice and support than I could ever have hoped for. If you find yourself faced with well-meaning but desperately clueless folk, or a therapist who pushes you too hard, too soon, or friends and family who want you to ‘pull yourself together’ – READ THIS.

Seriously. It will help.

 

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  Depressive Illness: The Curse Of The Strong

 

In contrast many books on depression, this text takes the view that those most susceptible to depression are people with strong personalities. Being naturally conscientious and reliable, they tend to carry on under great stress, where weaker people would simply give up. In the end the burden becomes too much and they succumb to depression rather like a rubber band which will snap if stretched too far. The work attempts to explain the cause of depression and how it can be treated – by looking after yourself, antidepressant treatments and talking therapies.

Forgotten by Cat Patrick

GENRE: Romance, YA | PAGES: 280

My rating: ★★

This brilliantly original idea of forgetting the past and ‘remembering’ the future is what made me desperate to read Forgotten. I have to say: I feel a little disappointed. The execution of this fabulous idea wasn’t as fabulous as it could have been, or rather – as fabulous as I was hoping.

The writing is fine, and there are several moments throughout the story that had meaning to them, but on the whole, I felt as though there was room for so much more.

The characters were a little under-developed and the love story, which I think was meant to be portrayed as being intense, came off as crush-like. That said, the mystery towards the end of the story really kicked things up a notch. Had this been an equal part of the overall book, the story would have been a lot stronger.

I guess I should bear in mind that this book is for a young adult audience but on the other hand, I have read several YAs and loved them. Overall, I give this 2 – maybe 2.5. I liked Luke, and the mum, and I loved the memory issue, but this one was certainly not one for me, which is a shame really as it had the potential to be incredible.

Nevertheless, I am still looking forward to reading The Originals by this author.

 

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  Forgotten

 

Each night when 16 year-old London Lane goes to sleep, her whole world disappears. In the morning, all that’s left is a note telling her about a day she can’t remember. The whole scenario doesn’t exactly make high school or dating that hot guy whose name she can’t seem to recall any easier. But when London starts experiencing disturbing visions she can’t make sense of, she realizes it’s time to learn a little more about the past she keeps forgetting-before it destroys her future. Part psychological drama, part romance, and part mystery, this thought-provoking novel will inspire readers to consider the what-if’s in their own lives and recognise the power they have to control their destinies.

No-One Ever Has Sex On A Tuesday by Tracy Bloom

GENRE: Humour, Romance | PAGES: 190

My rating: ★★★

No-One Ever Has Sex On A Tuesday is lighthearted and witty, and refreshingly real in places. British wit at its best. Will definitely be checking out other books by this author.

  No-One Ever Has Sex On A Tuesday

 

Never has a late-night stand led to such chaos! Childhood sweethearts Matthew and Katy agree they must never see each other ever again after they end up in bed together following a school re-union. So all is forgotten…until eight months later when a shock meeting at an antenatal class forces them to confront the fact that Matthew could be the father of Katy’s baby. Oblivious to the mayhem unfolding, Matthews highly strung wife frets over giving birth to twins and Katy’s much younger boyfriend refuses to take fatherhood seriously. Love and life are messy but Katy and Matthew take things to a whole new level as deep emotions begin to resurface and hormones run riot. How will they navigate their way through this almighty pick-up?

Twilight: The Graphic Novel, Vol. 2by Stephenie Meyer

GENRE: Graphic Novel, Romance, YA | PAGES: 240

My rating: ★★★

Twilight: The Graphic Novel, Vol. 2 is a good. It is the second half of the graphic novel versions of Meyer’s Twilight. The artwork is very good and the story is set at a good pace, better paced than Meyer’s own story in my opinion.

  Twilight: The Graphic Novel, Vol. 2

 

Having uncovered the dark secret of her enigmatic classmate, Edward Cullen, Bella Swan embraces her feelings for him, trusting Edward to keep her safe despite the risks. When a rival clan of vampires makes its way into Forks, though, the danger to Bella has never been more real. Will she make the ultimate sacrifice to protect the people dearest to her? The second volume of Twilight: The Graphic Novel completes the visual adaptation of Stephenie Meyer’s worldwide bestselling debut novel and is a must-have for any collector’s library.

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

GENRE: Classics, Romance | PAGES: 392

My rating: ★★★★★

In a recent urge to watch any and all period dramas I could get my hands on, I was, on reaching the end of my collection, forced to resort to off-screen measures. Having started and not finished Wuthering Heights more times than I care to admit, I opted for Miss Austen, and I am pleased to say, I read, finished, and thoroughly enjoyed Pride and Prejudice (more than I thought possible).

I have always struggled with the long winded mannerisms in classic novels, but there was something about this book that overrides that. I love Elizabeth’s spunky nature, and Wickham’s villainous charm and needless to say, Darcy’s transformation under the influence of his love for another is by far, the best bit of it all. Jane Austen writes with wit and irony, and with a real knack of placing the reader so bewitchingly into the lives of her (justifiably) well-known characters.

 

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  Pride and Prejudice

 

When Elizabeth Bennet first meets eligible bachelor Fitzwilliam Darcy, she thinks him arrogant and conceited; he is indifferent to her good looks and lively mind. When she later discovers that Darcy has involved himself in the troubled relationship between his friend Bingley and her beloved sister Jane, she is determined to dislike him more than ever. In the sparkling comedy of manners that follows, Jane Austen shows the folly of judging by first impressions and superbly evokes the friendships, gossip and snobberies of provincial middle-class life.

Welcome To The Working Week by Paul Vlitos

GENRE: Humour | PAGES: 345

My rating: ★★★★

Welcome To The Working Week was brilliantly funny. So dry and witty, and down to earth.

The way it was written was in the form of emails in and out of Martin Sargeant’s email account, in much the same style as Holly’s Inbox, if anyone has read that. (I started it but didn’t finish, but plan to go back to it now that I’ve read this, to compare the two.)

The format of the story is clever – it relays just enough information of actual events to the reader without actually reading any of that action as it’s happening, but we do get a clear insight into the character’s themselves through their communication with one another. It works marvellously!

There’s a lighthearted little story here, with massive doses of humour. Reads like a funnier, more clever (and obviously male) version of a tech-savvy Bridget Jones, and will make you laugh out loud whilst reading it. *stifles giggles on public transport*

 

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 Welcome To The Working Week

 

‘Welcome To The Working Week’ is the debut novel by Paul Vlitos. He offers a flinchingly funny look at modern life and the friends, flirtations and foolishness that keep it running.

What’s Left of Me (The Hybrid Chronicles, #1) by Kat Zhang

GENRE: Paranormal, YA | PAGES: 352

My rating: ★★★

I really enjoyed What’s Left of Me. It was added to my reading list for originality (and the Z in my Author A-Z Challenge) – and after an even-paced start, it really took off around the middle! 

The story read like a movie, in that it actually kept me on the edge of my seat.

My only complaint comes in at about a third of the way through the book – I can’t pin it down, but there were just parts of the writing that felt rushed or unpolished. The writing strengthened as the story gained momentum however, and I became so engrossed that the single flaw lost significance.

I started this book on a stand-alone basis but having read it now, I will definitely be checking out the rest of the series.

 

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  What's Left of Me

 

I should not exist. But I do.

Eva and Addie started out the same way as everyone else—two souls woven together in one body, taking turns controlling their movements as they learned how to walk, how to sing, how to dance. But as they grew, so did the worried whispers. Why aren’t they settling? Why isn’t one of them fading? The doctors ran tests, the neighbors shied away, and their parents begged for more time. Finally Addie was pronounced healthy and Eva was declared gone. Except, she wasn’t . . . For the past three years, Eva has clung to the remnants of her life. Only Addie knows she’s still there, trapped inside their body. Then one day, they discover there may be a way for Eva to move again. The risks are unimaginable-hybrids are considered a threat to society, so if they are caught, Addie and Eva will be locked away with the others. And yet . . . for a chance to smile, to twirl, to speak, Eva will do anything.

Drip Drop Teardrop by Samantha Young

GENRE: Paranormal, Romance, YA | PAGES: 166

My rating: ★★★

If Drip Drop Teardrop had been fleshed out a little more, it would have been, quite simply, an amazing book. Instead, it felt a bit rushed, a bit glossed over and there were several typos I tried not to see.

That aside, it was very original and entertaining. I found myself so drawn to the two main characters; despite the shortness of the story itself, the author created a well-rounded protagonist; Avery’s strength shone through and her fears were believable. I love that she essentially saved herself and that her choice was her own.

And given the choice–flawed but beautiful Brennus–who could blame her. 

 

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 Drip Drop Teardrop

 

Avery hasn’t had it easy. When she was ten years old her parents died in a car crash. Now nine years later her Aunt Caroline is the only family she has left. And Caroline is dying. So when Death comes knocking (quite literally) in the form of the damaged and dangerous, Brennus, Avery makes a deal with the reaper in order to save Caroline.

Brennus is an Ankou. One of the many, once mortal men and women, who were given the choice to become an immortal in exchange for ferrying the dead over into their afterlife. Nine years ago Brennus took Avery’s parents and tried to take Avery, but she fought him and won. Amazed by her strength Brennus followed Avery and has watched over her. Now he knows Avery is the one to offer him freedom from his obligation to the dead. And he’ll stop at nothing to have her.

True Confessions of Margaret Hilda Roberts Aged 14 ¼ by Sue Townsend

GENRE: Humour | PAGES: 27

My rating: ★★★

True Confessions of Margaret Hilda Roberts is funny stuff!

Tuesday May 24th

Had a lie in until 6am. Then got out of bed and had a brisk rub down with the pumice stone. I opened the curtains and saw that the sun was shining brightly. (A suspicion is growing in my mind that the BBC is not to be trusted.)

It took me a while to realise who this fictional diary belonged to but when I did, it really clicked into place; the over achieving teenager is hilariously unmistakable!

 

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  True Confessions of Margaret Hilda Roberts

 

Margaret Hilda Roberts is a rather ambitious 14-year-old grocer’s daughter from Grantham. She can’t abide laziness, finds four hours of chemistry homework delightful and believes she is of royal birth – or at least destined for great things. But Margaret knows that good things never come to those who wait . . . These are the secret diary entries of a girl born into an ordinary life, yet who might just go on to become something really rather extraordinary, and she is brilliantly brought vividly to life by bestselling author Sue Townsend, Britain’s favourite comic writer for over three decades.

The Lives She Left Behind by James Long

GENRE: Fantasy, Romance | PAGES: 472

My rating: ★★★★★

Bloody BRILLIANT! The Lives She Left Behind is the follow-up to the phenomenal Ferney.

It. Is. Brilliant! It really is!

Sixteen years on from the birth of Gally’s daughter, a troubled young girl called Jo finds herself drawn to the Somerset village of Pen Selwood.

The ancient, magical bond of a centuries-old love pulls Jo’s true self through her fears, and back to the root of it all–back to Ferney.

Beautifully written and steeped in history, this book is easily as good, if not better, than the first one!

 

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 The Lives She Left Behind

 

In a Somerset village, a teenage boy confronts a teacher with a story he should know nothing about. The boy’s impossible knowledge uncovers memories Michael Martin has done his utmost to forget – and soon propels him into danger. As Martin confronts his past once more, three girls arrive in the village of Pen Selwood, one of them drawn by an ancient instinct to find a man called Ferney. Her actions reignite a love story, an instinct that cannot be broken, irrespective of the hurt and danger it brings to those around them…

A Nomadic Witch (A Modern Witch, #4) by Debora Geary

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance | PAGES: 263

My rating: ★★★★

I am enjoying the A Modern Witch series even more as it goes on.

I love the Witch Central base formation over the course of the last four books. It really lends a Disney quality to the series. The characters are even more well-rounded than in the beginning and it feels like I’ve come to know them.

Moira is the grandmother of all grandmothers; Nell is a fierce and fiery superwoman, and Devin–ahh, Devin… sigh…

Really, those three are my personal favourites, but every one of Geary’s creations now resonates with true, individual character.

This book, A Nomadic Witch, saw development in Marcus, perpetual grump with a big but broken heart, having lost his twin brother to the Mists forty years earlier.

The arrival of a baby from the Mists that only he can care for opens a channel into the pain he has tried to bury since he was five, and he learns to love the witchling as his own. The problem is that she is a traveller of the Mists just as his twin was and now he has to fight to keep her safe or risk losing himself again.

I liked the fact that this book didn’t shy away from his pain. As light-hearted as the series is, I feel it gave it so much more depth; part of the reason I also really liked A Reckless Witch.

I haven’t downloaded the others yet… as much as I love them I find the continuous new characters a little tedious; I intend to complete the series eventually though after a little break away from the Disney movie warmth.

*Having angst-monkey withdrawal symptoms.*

 

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  A Nomadic Witch (A Modern Witch, #4)

 

Spring brings a traveller to Nova Scotia – a tiny babe who will turn Marcus’s life upside down and reincarnate the horrifying events of his past. Can Marcus find his way through the pain to love and healing? And can the witching community finally learn to keep their astral travellers safe? A Nomadic Witch is book four of the top-rated A Modern Witch series. Light contemporary fantasy with a good dose of humour, a little romance, and characters you won’t want to leave.

A Reckless Witch (A Modern Witch, #3) by Debora Geary

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance | PAGES: 304

My rating: ★★★★

One word: Devin! I have such a crush on the reckless, free-spirited man-boy! He becomes an honorary brother to the titular Reckless Witch in Geary’s third installment of the A Modern Witch series.

Excessive ‘cookie eating’ and ‘punk witchling’ name tags aside, I have only good things to say about this series so far. And they’re getting better every time. If you’re in the mood for a lighthearted, heartwarming read with humour, family values, and modern magic thrown in the mix–this is it.

I’m hooked. And I’m usually a drama junkie, angst-monkey. But I just can’t help myself. 🙂

 

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 A Reckless Witch (A Modern Witch, #3)

 

With great power comes great responsibility. So says the tradition of witching. One teenage witch missed that lesson… As a child, Sierra Brighton traveled the world. She swam with the baby whales, danced in storm funnels, and lived in complete magical freedom. And then Momma died and Sierra ended up in foster care, an unhappy and very secret witch. Fetched by Nell’s spell, she’ll no longer need to do magic on lonely beaches – but can Sierra learn to use her power safely? Or will her reckless blood put Witch Central at risk?

Flat-Out Love by Jessica Park

GENRE: Romance, YA | PAGES: 389

My rating: ★★★

I started Flat Out Love because I’d reached a reading lull. I wanted something that was easy and not at all serious, and happily, I got what I came for.

This book is a great read if you’re looking for something that you don’t have to really think about too much; it was easy, the way it is written is done with flow and good pace and it’s light and witty. It has a slightly more serious undertone to it, which gives the story the depth it needs, but this doesn’t consume you in any way.

Flat Out Love is perfect for lazy Summer afternoons.

P.S. I think after this, I might also get myself a Flat Finn.

 

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  flat out love

 

Something is seriously off in the Watkins home. And Julie Seagle, college freshman, small-town Ohio transplant, and the newest resident of this Boston house, is determined to get to the bottom of it. When Julie’s off-campus housing falls through, her mother’s old college roommate, Erin Watkins, invites her to move in. The parents, Erin and Roger, are welcoming, but emotionally distant and academically driven to eccentric extremes. The middle child, Matt, is an MIT tech geek with a sweet side… and the social skills of a spool of USB cable. The youngest, Celeste, is a frighteningly bright but freakishly fastidious 13-year-old who hauls around a life-sized cardboard cutout of her oldest brother almost everywhere she goes. And there’s that oldest brother, Finn: funny, gorgeous, smart, sensitive, almost emotionally available. Geographically? Definitely unavailable. That’s because Finn is traveling the world and surfacing only for random Facebook chats, e-mails, and status updates. Before long, through late-night exchanges of disembodied text, he begins to stir something tender and silly and maybe even a little bit sexy in Julie’s suddenly lonesome soul. To Julie, the emotionally scrambled members of the Watkins family add up to something that … well… doesn’t quite add up. Not until she forces a buried secret to the surface, eliciting a dramatic confrontation that threatens to tear the fragile Watkins family apart, does she get her answer.

What Alice Forgot by Liane Moriarty

GENRE: Contemporary | PAGES: 476

My rating: ★★

Mixed feelings about this one. What Alice Forgot was an enjoyable read but there were parts of it that didn’t seem well blended enough into the story. Does that even make sense?

First of, I have to admit: I just didn’t like Alice. She was just… someone I couldn’t bring myself to care about. 

Her sister Elisabeth was different. I enjoyed reading Elisabeth’s pieces so much more. She was real and believable.

As the story progressed I learnt to tolerate Alice. She kind of grew on me. And I liked where she was taking her life after being jolted back into it with no directions or user manual. Somewhere along the way I wanted to slap her again but maybe it had more to do with the memory loss than it did to do with Alice on the whole. Who knows?

Not the best read but entertaining enough. My lacklustre review sums it up without me having to babble on and on, so I’ll give this an average 2.5 / 3 stars and leave it at that.

 

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  What Alice Forgot

 

Alice Love is twenty-nine, crazy about her husband, and pregnant with her first child. So imagine Alice’s surprise when she comes to on the floor of a gym and is whisked off to the hospital where she discovers the honeymoon is truly over — she’s getting divorced, she has three kids and she’s actually 39 years old. Alice must reconstruct the events of a lost decade, and find out whether it’s possible to reconstruct her life at the same time. She has to figure out why her sister hardly talks to her, and how is it that she’s become one of those super skinny moms with really expensive clothes. Ultimately, Alice must discover whether forgetting is a blessing or a curse, and whether it’s possible to start over.

Stolen: A Letter to My Captor by Lucy Christopher

GENRE: Dark, YA | PAGES: 304

My rating: ★★★★

This book made me question my own state of mind!

Apart from being really well written and engaging, it also left me with that rare and lingering ‘book aftermath’…

Gemma, the book’s voice, is taken – stolen – at an airport in Bangladesh by someone who looks vaguely familiar to her. She wakes up in a room of a house in the middle of the Australian desert and discovers that there is nowhere to run to.

Her captor Ty is a self-sufficient man of the land and introduces her to his ideal way of life, and also his idea of how she fits into it all.

Throughout, the book paints a vivid picture – the heat of the desert, the intensity of Ty and his many issues, the confusion of Gemma as she learns about her kidnapper and herself.

Once again, as with Forbidden and Comfort Food, I found myself having an odd reaction to the events within the story.

Whilst I obviously knew the situation was wrong, I couldn’t deny the fact that I saw their connection and willed it to deepen and develop.

Being based around the relationship and events of a kidnapper and his victim, there was always a huge amount of room for Stockholm syndrome. I kind of expected it.

But it never really came.

Even though Gemma cared for and maybe even fell a little bit in love with her kidnapper, and even though she was dependent on him for her survival (and her sanity to a certain extent) I personally don’t think she suffered from the syndrome. When she finally understands what she is feeling, it seems genuine, rather than a direct response to the kidnap situation.

Overall, my thoughts on this book are hugely positive; it was a rather gripping read and also food for thought (which is always good).

On a closing note, I should point out that if anyone suffered from Stockholm syndrome during this tale it would be me. It simply has to be me – because without a technical term to back me up I would only have the basic acknowledgement of having a serious Jones for the disturbed (but delicious) Ty.

 

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  stolen

 

It happened like this. I was stolen from an airport. Taken from everything I knew, everything I was used to. Taken to sand and heat, dirt and danger. And he expected me to love him. This is my story. A letter from nowhere. Sixteen year old Gemma is kidnapped from Bangkok airport and taken to the Australian Outback. This wild and desolate landscape becomes almost a character in the book, so vividly is it described. Ty, her captor, is no stereotype. He is young, fit and completely gorgeous. This new life in the wilderness has been years in the planning. He loves only her, wants only her. Under the hot glare of the Australian sun, cut off from the world outside, can the force of his love make Gemma love him back? The story takes the form of a letter, written by Gemma to Ty, reflecting on those strange and disturbing months in the outback. Months when the lines between love and obsession, and love and dependency, blur until they don’t exist – almost.

The Secret Diary of a Sex Addict by Amber Stephens

GENRE: Erotica | PAGES: 352

My rating: ★★★

Not a bad read. The Secret Diary of a Sex Addict is reasonably well written, kinda witty in places, and of course, very steamy.

Each erotic scene was given from a different person’s point of view. The fact that each person was in the addict recovery group lent itself to the overall story which had a bit of an actual plot (that’s more than I can say for some erotica!)

The number of typos in the Kindle version irritated me endlessly though, and the way the ending just kind of comes out of nowhere doesn’t do the book any favours; it just felt a bit like the author ran out of people and addictions and couldn’t think of where to take us next.

Other than that, I enjoyed it. 

  The Secret Diary of a Sex Addict

 

Shelley Matthews is married to her job as a journalist at a glossy women’s magazine. Which is just as well as she hasn’t had sex for over a year. But when her editor decides a re-vamp of the magazine is needed, Shelley is forced to go undercover – as a sex addict

Room by Emma Donoghue

GENRE: Contemporary | PAGES: 321

My rating: ★★★★★

Room is… good… By good, I mean not just good but lunch-skipping, sleep-depriving, don’t-f***ing-disturb-me good. In fact, good doesn’t cover it. Great doesn’t do it justice either. There isn’t a word for how I feel about it.

It is excellently written from page one, the opening sentence:

‘Today I’m five. I was four last night going to sleep in Wardrobe…’

I was instantly drawn to the story this five-year-old was about to tell.

There were several times I paused to wonder how a child of his age could know so much yet so little; and then there was a moment before starting to read when I wondered whether a story from a child’s viewpoint would just be bad news: patronising at worst, sappy and sentimental at best. But man, am I ever glad I read it anyway. I stand – no, I sit, exhausted from the journey that is Room – corrected.

It wasn’t patronising, or sappy or sentimental. It was just plain overwhelming and quite simply, the whole damn thing just worked. And as for this sharp, intelligent boy… I realised that those bits I questioned, were merely moments I hadn’t quite placed myself in, as a child… an innocent, clean-slated, unbiased child. How could I? Therefore who the hell was I to damn well question what he felt or how and why or how much he knew or understood? I just let it be.

Within minutes of starting I was hooked on the story, captured by this child and his energy for the life he lived, in Room.

As the story progresses you learn more about his Ma, her own story, her own trauma and battles against what is; yet as many stories as I’ve read of others in her situation, I have never come across anything quite so unique as this. And it is because of Jack.

He is a born storyteller, taking us all along at a gallop.

Somehow this original pint-sized protagonist is ten times more powerful as he is than if he were a bellowing giant on a mountaintop.

If you haven’t read this yet, please DO. If only to meet Jack. Once you do, you will not forget him or his tale in a hurry. 

 

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Room

 

Jack is five, and excited about his birthday. He lives with his Ma in Room, which has a locked door and a skylight, and measures eleven feet by eleven feet. He loves watching TV, and the cartoon characters he calls friends, but he knows that nothing he sees on screen is truly real – only him, Ma and the things in Room. Until the day Ma admits that there’s a world outside… Told in Jack’s voice, Room is the story of a mother and son whose love lets them survive the impossible. Unsentimental and sometimes funny, devastating yet uplifting, Room is a novel like no other.

Never Tell by Alafair Burke

GENRE: Suspense | PAGES: 368

My rating: ★★★

Never Tell is edgy and well paced. Not the best of the thriller/mystery books I’ve read so far this year but certainly a good read that kept me hooked. An eighth of the way through I was convinced that I’d cracked the case and yet I was wrong. That gave the ending a refreshing twist.

 

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  Never Tell

 

Detective Ellie Hatcher will be forced to uncover the truth behind the apparent suicide of a teenaged girl with intriguing connections to both New York’s wealthiest—and its most dispossessed. This addictive thriller from acclaimed suspense writer Alafair Burke draws its details from the author’s own experiences as a criminal law professor and deputy district attorney, creating an exhilarating, true-to-life tale of crime and its consequences that is perfect for fans of Laura Lippman, Harlan Coben, and Burke’s breakout standalone thriller Long Gone.

Here She Lies by Katia Lief

GENRE: Suspense | PAGES: 256

My rating: ★★

2/5 or maybe a 2.5/5. Here She Lies was okay. Average. The last half of the book certainly went at a better pace than the first half and the twist in the ending was pleasantly unexpected since everything else up to that point was more predictable than the ending of Romeo and Juliet.

The slow build-up in the beginning was off-putting, and the main character wasn’t always believable. She over-reacted to small, more neutral things yet seemed often unfazed by the more horrifying events… Her personality was a bit lacking in places. The fact that she identified with her twin so much that she viewed them as one and the same person was odd (even for a twin thing) – I just couldn’t jump on board with the idea of this grown woman having no urge to exert a sense of self. I found myself skim reading a lot of her inner thought and twin-related blurbs because it was just too ridiculous.

The story itself was ok, the writing was fair and it kept me entertained in the two days it took to read it. I have another one by this author on my kindle so here’s hoping for a slightly more gutsy protagonist.

As for this one, I’d recommend it for passing the time, if you fancy a ‘softcore’ version of a crime thriller.

 

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  Here She Lies

 

WHEN ANNIE’S IDENTITY IS STOLEN…SHE RUNS BUT CANNOT HIDE. After discovering an email revealing her husband’s infidelity, Annie Milliken is shattered. Dismissing his pleas of innocence, Annie takes their baby daughter and goes to the one person she has always trusted: her twin sister, Julie. Annie and Julie soon become as close as they were growing up, spending their days together, dressing the same, sharing the baby. But when Annie applies for a job, everything comes undone. Her credit cards are stolen just as she’s arrested for grand larceny. The police realize she is the victim of identity theft, but she has yet to understand the true scale of the crime. And when Annie turns to Julie for help, she finds that her twin sister has disappeared…along with her baby. Now with her daughter–and her own life–on the line, Annie is going to fight for what is hers.

How to Be a Woman by Caitlin Moran

GENRE: Humour, Non-fiction | PAGES: 312

My rating: ★★★★★

“So here is the quick way of working out if you’re a feminist. Put your hand in your pants.
a) Do you have a vagina? and
b) Do you want to be in charge of it?
If you said ‘yes’ to both, then congratulations!
You’re a feminist.”

Moran is witty and clever and candid. Easily one of my new favourite books, How To Be a Woman is a must-read!

Read it! Read it now! NOW!

 

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  How to Be a Woman

 

Though they have the vote and the Pill and haven’t been burned as witches since 1727, life isn’t exactly a stroll down the catwalk for modern women. They are beset by uncertainties and questions: Why are they supposed to get Brazilians? Why do bras hurt? Why the incessant talk about babies? And do men secretly hate them? Caitlin Moran interweaves provocative observations on women’s lives with laugh-out-loud funny scenes from her own, from adolescence to her development as a writer, wife, and mother.

A Discovery of Witches (All Souls Trilogy, #1) by Deborah Harkness

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance | PAGES: 602

My rating: ★★★★

I am enjoying this series so far. A Discovery of Witches was intriguing from the very beginning although sometimes the storytelling was a bit long-winded. That said, it kept my interest and now I simply must continue the adventure. Matthew is typically hot-headed and overprotective, and his knowledge and experiences are amazingly written. Diana is on a self-discovering journey and each piece of magic and witchcraft is captured on the page in fine detail.

The pair made a fine couple to read about (even though Matthew’s abstinence makes me want to scream).

I can’t say it’s the best ‘witchy’ book I’ve ever read but it IS the best in a long time.
 

 

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 A Discovery of Witches

 

A richly inventive novel about a centuries-old vampire, a spellbound witch, and the mysterious manuscript that draws them together. Deep in the stacks of Oxford’s Bodleian Library, young scholar Diana Bishop unwittingly calls up a bewitched alchemical manuscript in the course of her research. Descended from an old and distinguished line of witches, Diana wants nothing to do with sorcery; so after a furtive glance and a few notes, she banishes the book to the stacks. But her discovery sets a fantastical underworld stirring, and a horde of daemons, witches, and vampires soon descends upon the library. Diana has stumbled upon a coveted treasure lost for centuries-and she is the only creature who can break its spell.

Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair by Pablo Neruda

GENRE: Poetry | PAGES: 70

My rating: ★★★★

Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair is an amazing collection of poetry. His words caress the senses; imagery so delicious and fulfilling you can not only see it but smell and taste and feel it… portraying journeys of love and likening them to the sea, the shore, the sun – a heady mixture of heat and dampness much like the beauty of physical love.

He takes nature’s finest and effortlessly portray love affairs.

‘…I want to do with you what spring does with the cherry trees…’

On the other hand…

‘…Love is so short, forgetting is so long…’

With a single sentence, he can summarise the anguish of lost love.

His single song of despair at the end of the collection is, by far, my personal favourite simply because he captures the essence of heartache in such a way it left me reeling.

 

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 Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair

 

Drawn from the most intimate and personal associations, Pablo Neruda’s most beloved collection of poetry juxtaposes the exuberance of youthful passion with the desolation of grief, the sensuality of the body with the metaphorical nuances of nature. Pulitzer Prize-winning poet W. S. Merwin’s masterly translation faces the original Spanish text. This edition also features an insightful Introduction by Cristina Garcia. More than eighty years after its publication, Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair stands as an essential collection that continues to inspire lovers and poets around the world.

Fifty Shades Freed by E L James

GENRE: Erotica, Romance | PAGES: 579

My rating: ★★★

Completed Fifty Shades Freed at last. Finishing the Fifty Shades trilogy took much longer than I would have liked. Had I read it through without the long lapse between book two and three I may have enjoyed it a whole lot more.

That said, on the whole, it has been a very enjoyable read.

Fifty Shades Freed (book three) started with more than its fair share of hearts and flowers and I found myself muddling through the majority of this as opposed to hare-pacing it as with the previous books. Admittedly that’s more to do with the fact that I’m all up for angst and intensity, and given the stage in Christian and Ana’s relationship, it was, to begin with, very angst-free.

Halfway through however, it was back on track. I couldn’t put it down. The action scenes were my favourite here, even topping the smutty parts. Ana’s strength came through in this book and Christian’s puzzle of a past finally made sense. The two scenes at the end of the book were particularly intriguing, allowing us inside of his head for a while.

On the flip side, there was far too much ‘smirking’ and ‘murmuring’ for my liking–characteristic traits do have their limits, and the similarities between this plot and the plot points of the Twilight Saga were more evident here too.

That said, the series does stand its ground and I’d recommend it to anyone who’s looking for something intense on one hand yet fairly easy to read. (Note: There are several instances throughout the series which might pose a potential trigger for victims of abuse.)

Christian Grey is one of those characters you’ll find yourself rooting for one minute and loathing the next, and I can’t begin to imagine an actor that’s quite good enough to do all his Fifty Shades (of fucked up) justice.

 

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 Fifty Shades Freed

 

Romantic, liberating and totally addictive, the Fifty Shades trilogy will obsess you, possess you and stay with you for ever. When Ana Steele first encountered the driven, damaged entrepreneur Christian Grey, it sparked a sensual affair that changed both their lives irrevocably. Ana always knew that loving her Fifty Shades would not be easy, and being together poses challenges neither of them had anticipated. Ana must learn to share Grey’s opulent lifestyle without sacrificing her own integrity or independence; and Grey must overcome his compulsion to control and lay to rest the horrors that still haunt him. Now, finally together, they have love, passion, intimacy, wealth, and a world of infinite possibilities. But just when it seems that they really do have it all, tragedy and fate combine to make Ana’s worst nightmares come true …

Fifty Shades Darker by E L James

GENRE: Erotica, Romance | PAGES: 532

My rating: ★★★★

I found the second part of the Fifty Shades trilogy, Fifty Shades Darker, to be better than the first.

The writing, again, isn’t high-quality but the author’s characters are very readable and in this book they become more 3D. That development lends itself to the story; pieces of the puzzle fit into place and as a whole makes for an interesting little read.

Have just started part three which, at the moment, feels a bit predictable. That remains to be seen. Here’s hoping for a few twists. 

 

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 Fifty Shades Darker by E L James

 

Daunted by the singular sexual tastes and dark secrets of the beautiful, tormented young entrepreneur Christian Grey, Anastasia Steele has broken off their relationship to start a new career with a Seattle publishing house. But desire for Christian still dominates her every waking thought, and when he proposes a new arrangement, Anastasia cannot resist. They rekindle their searing sensual affair, and Anastasia learns more about the harrowing past of her damaged, driven, and demanding Fifty Shades. While Christian wrestles with his inner demons, Anastasia must confront her anger and envy of the women who came before her and make the most important decision of her life. Erotic, sparkling and suspenseful, Fifty Shades Darker is the irresistibly addictive second part of the Fifty Shades trilogy.

Fifty Shades of Grey by E L James

GENRE: Erotica, Romance | PAGES: 514

My rating: ★★★

My initial reaction on finishing Fifty Shades of Grey? In the overused words of Anastasia Steele: ‘Oh my…

If that two-word response just made you cringe, run along now, and save yourself the trouble. Because Ana says this a lot. A whole lot. Ana also constantly refers to an inner goddess and a (judgey, cranky) subconscious as a way to express her desires without using an inner monologue. Readers have reviewed this as annoying or odd, or downright ridiculous. Personally, I thought: hmm, quirky. This is a fairly unique way to demonstrate the whole ID, ego thing. But, this was an initial opinion. And like everything, moderation is key. When Ana’s inner goddess started back flipping and dancing the merengue, and the salsa, and begging on bended knee… my eyes rolled so far back in my head I lost my place on the page.

Here are several other things Ana does: she resolves to stand her ground, fails to stand her ground, signs away her right to stand her ground, becomes so infatuated with Christian and his hair and his long fingers and his helicopter (I’ll give her that one) that she FORGETS she has ground to even stand on…

You get the picture, right?

Good. Because I wasn’t sure what to expect starting this one. With all the hype, I wondered whether I’d end up disappointed. Then again I already felt disappointed that the book had gained popularity purely for the erotica element. Surely there was more to it than that?

There was!

And whilst I can’t say I LOVED it, I will say I certainly didn’t HATE it either. I’m on the reader fence.

Ultimately, what does it for me (besides the sex!) is the twisted intensity of Ana and Christian’s relationship. There are times when it is sweet, and funny–and their banter, particularly via email, is witty. The dialogue in the email exchanges is natural and easy–even more so than their face to face encounters. That’s the good side of their relationship. Then there’s that exciting wine-and-dine me phase–Christian’s mysterious allure, his power, all the bits of Mr Grey that make you swoon even when you’re trying really hard not to.

BUT the bits that REALLY intrigue me are Christian’s darker shades. Christian reads like a kinky, more fucked-up Heathcliff/Cullen hybrid; but what REALLY gets me is the reason behind it all. For me, it’s not about romanticising the borderline abuse from Christian for which the author is often slated for. It’s about WHY he is the way he is. I’m drawn to dark novels in general and this intrigue around Christian’s character is compelling enough to keep pulling you along.

So the writing isn’t phenomenal… big deal. So it started off as a Twilight fanfic… big deal.

All I want to know is what could make a human being who on one hand, is a kind, generous, hard-working man, turn out to be so fundamentally messed up on the other hand. Because let’s face it: Christian is a hot mess. And while I can read several pages and focus solely on the HOT element, sooner or later, that MESS is harder to ignore.

And yet, all I want to do is hug him. Figure him out.

Piece by piece the story reveals itself but still, it doesn’t add up. It doesn’t satisfy. Like Ana, you want more. And so, when you think no one is watching, you sneak off to get book two and silently ask that the literary gods don’t hold it against you. 

 

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Fifty Shades of Grey

 

When literature student Anastasia Steele is drafted to interview the successful young entrepreneur Christian Grey for her campus magazine, she finds him attractive, enigmatic and intimidating. Convinced their meeting went badly, she tries to put Grey out of her mind – until he happens to turn up at the out-of-town hardware store where she works part-time. The unworldly, innocent Ana is shocked to realize she wants this man, and when he warns her to keep her distance it only makes her more desperate to get close to him. Unable to resist Ana’s quiet beauty, wit, and independent spirit, Grey admits he wants her – but on his own terms. Shocked yet thrilled by Grey’s singular erotic tastes, Ana hesitates. For all the trappings of success – his multinational businesses, his vast wealth, his loving adoptive family – Grey is man tormented by demons and consumed by the need to control. When the couple embarks on a passionate, physical and daring affair, Ana learns more about her own dark desires, as well as the Christian Grey hidden away from public scrutiny. Can their relationship transcend physical passion? Will Ana find it in herself to submit to the self-indulgent Master? And if she does, will she still love what she finds?

Erotic, amusing, and deeply moving, the Fifty Shades Trilogy is a tale that will obsess you, possess you, and stay with you forever.

Such a Pretty Girl by Laura Wiess

GENRE: Contemporary, Dark, YA | PAGES: 212

My rating: ★★★★

Such a Pretty Girl is such an unpretty story.

Want a book with a horrid topic? Filled with terror? Despair? Betrayal? Stand aside Horror authors and make room for a different kind of fear. The kind that chills and fascinates; moreover the kind that for some, occurs in everyday life.

Did I say fascinate? Yes, I suppose I did. We have to admit to the fascination or why else would we want to read about it? It’s a weird thing when I can soar through books like this yet take months reading genuine classics. It’s not something I’d readily admit to for fear that my interest in this topic will be taken the wrong way.

Somehow though, authors of books like this make me realise that there must be others just like me. Like I said, why else would we read stories like this one and moreover why else would anyone write them?

The answer is the tale. In every victim’s sad and tragic story there is a fighter waiting to stand their ground; a predator dodging bad karma. This story delivers that in Meredith’s clear voice. Her struggle, her ways of coping–it is all very real–and her triumph in the end, though bittersweet for having to endure the pain before that, is nonetheless a victory.

For all the intrigue and fascination and background psychology that this story–and others like it–may hold, I think I might just be a sucker for a good (read: happy) ending as much as anyone else.

 

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Such a Pretty Girl

 

They promised Meredith nine years of safety, but only gave her three.
Her father was supposed to be locked up until Meredith turned eighteen. She thought she had time to grow up, get out, and start a new life. But Meredith is only fifteen, and today her father is coming home from prison. Today her time has run out.

Living Dead Girl by Elizabeth Scott

GENRE: Dark, Suspense, YA | PAGES: 110

My rating: ★★★★

Brilliantly disturbing book. Impossible to put this down once you’ve begun. It is a sad story told in such blunt and vivid detail it will make you want to look away and retch a little. Yet you’ll keep reading. It’s like a car crash. My only gripe is that it’s just a hundred and ten pages long… saying that, whilst I devoured this in 48 hours, any more than that of this horrific tale would have been biting off way more than I could chew. The author clearly knew what she was doing.

 

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  Living Dead Girl

 

Once upon a time, I was a little girl who disappeared. Once upon a time, my name was not Alice. Once upon a time, I didn’t know how lucky I was. When Alice was ten, Ray took her away from her family, her friends — her life. She learned to give up all power, to endure all pain. She waited for the nightmare to be over. Now Alice is fifteen and Ray still has her, but he speaks more and more of her death. He does not know it is what she longs for. She does not know he has something more terrifying than death in mind for her. This is Alice’s story. It is one you have never heard, and one you will never, ever forget.

The Murderer’s Daughters by Randy Susan Meyers

GENRE: Contemporary, Suspense | PAGES: 313

My rating: ★★★★

The story of The Murderer’s Daughters begins with Lulu. At ten years old she is the eldest daughter. At ten years old she witnesses the death of her mother and the near-death of her five-year-old sister Merry – both her father’s doing.

What struck me (aside from the obvious) is the author’s clever way of writing, so that the sisters are seen to be ageing. It was as real as knowing them personally; snapshots into their lives as they were thrown into upheaval, their childhood and their family snatched from them in a single afternoon.

I couldn’t help but swallow this book whole – it wasn’t a pretty story and it isn’t a pretty subject given that this happens in the real world. Yet there was such strength in these girls’ characters (in opposing ways) that made me want to journey with them. I read this every chance I got and it lingered long after I put it down. The Murderer’s Daughters is the type of thought-provoking book that makes you wonder what you truly believe and what you perceive as ‘the right thing’. It is another of many amazing books that demonstrates how vast the grey area between right and wrong is – and a book that can open your eyes just a little wider is one which, to me, is worth every word.

 

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Lulu and Merry’s childhood was never ideal, but on the day before Lulu’s tenth birthday their father drives them into a nightmare. He’s always hungered for the love of the girl’s self-obsessed mother; after she throws him out, their troubles turn deadly. Lulu’s mother warned her to never let him in, but when he shows up, he’s impossible to ignore. He bullies his way past ten-year-old Lulu, who obeys her father’s instructions to open the door, then listens in horror as her parents struggle. She runs for help and discovers upon her return that he’s murdered her mother, stabbed her sister, and tried to kill himself. For thirty years, the sisters try to make sense of what happened. Their imprisoned father is a specter in both their lives, shadowing every choice they make. Though one spends her life pretending he’s dead, while the other feels compelled to help him, both fear that someday their imprisoned father’s attempts to win parole may meet success.

Your Voice In My Head by Emma Forrest

GENRE: Memoir | PAGES: 224

My rating: ★★★

Your Voice in My Head is quite powerful and moving with real insight into the author’s life.

When it comes to writing about mental illness, there’s rarely ‘a good way’ to portray ‘a bad time’ but Forrest manages to do it. Her personality and wit shines through in places and adds to the book’s depth. She is frank and honest and never holds back what she wants to say. Her ‘Dr R’ sounds like he was a magnificent person and psychiatrist, and the wisdom he imparts through her memoir was something of a treasure to read about.

Best of all, despite the struggle, his faith and her hard work ensured genuine optimism towards her future and ultimately, saved her life. 

 

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 Your Voice In My Head

 

Emma Forrest, an English journalist, was twenty-two and living in America when she realised that her quirks had gone beyond eccentricity. Lonely, in a dangerous cycle of self-harm and damaging relationships, she found herself in the chair of a slim, balding and effortlessly optimistic psychiatrist – a man whose wisdom and humanity would wrench her from the vibrant and dangerous tide of herself, and who would help her to recover when she tried to end her life. Emma’s loving and supportive family circled around her in panic. She was on the brink of drowning. But she was also still working, still exploring, still writing, and she had also fallen deeply in love. One day, when Emma called to make an appointment with her psychiatrist, she found no one there. He had died, shockingly, at the age of fifty-three, leaving behind a young family. Processing the premature death of a man who’d become her anchor after she’d turned up on his doorstep, she was adrift. And when her significant and all-consuming relationship also fell apart, she was forced to cling to the page for survival. A modern-day fairy tale of New York, Your Voice in My Head is a dazzling and devastating memoir, clear-eyed and shot through with wit. In a voice unlike any other, Emma Forrest explores breakdown and mania, but also the beauty of love – and the heartbreak of loss.

A Certain Age by Rebecca Ray

GENRE: YA | PAGES: 416

My rating: ★★★

I don’t know how I feel about A Certain Age. I can’t really say I liked it yet I can’t say I DIDN’T like it.

The sheer numbness that radiates from the central character is staggering. Her disturbing view of herself and the intense and often awful situations she endures (and puts herself through) are what makes this novel go down like glass bottle. Saying that, once I started reading I swallowed that glass bottle in one go.

The writing style itself is somewhat awkward; certainly not great prose but this lends itself to the nature of the novel. Its stumbling style is not unlike the main character’s own struggle.

To some, her struggle may seem far fetched – it is not an everyday mainstream kind of situation nor is it a typical coming-of-age story, despite the title – however, these things do occur. There is realism at the base of this f*****-up story and that, I believe, is what kept me reading until the last page.

The ending was not entirely satisfying. It felt unfinished in so many ways. Somehow though it fits hand in glove with the rest of the book; it is the unpolished, sugar-free version of a teenage struggle without an imaginary quick-fix.

 

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 A Certain Age

 

‘I lost my virginity to a twenty-five year-old man. And on a schoolnight, too.’ Sex with an Older Man Parents who don’t understand Politics in the playground Blowjobs behind the bike-sheds Skinning up in the schoolyard It’s what happens when you reach a Certain Age. Just the hormones kicking in. We’ve all been there . . . haven’t we? A CERTAIN AGE – the reality behind the problem pages. It’s what Just 17 never told you about growing up.

Where Are You Now by Mary Higgins Clark

GENRE: Suspense | PAGES: 289

My rating: ★★★★

I know it’s a bit cliche to say this after reading a crime novel but honestly, I never suspected the actual killer once throughout reading Where Are You Now. I’d suspected nearly every other character in the book by the time I’d reached the last few chapters yet had completely overlooked the person it turned out to be.

My sleuthing skills need serious dusting–or maybe Mary Higgins Clark is just that good.

Where Are You Now was fast paced from the beginning and I couldn’t fault the plot. Great read!

 

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  where are you now

 

From America’s Queen of Suspense comes a gripping tale of a young woman trying to unravel the mystery of a family tragedy — a quest with terrifying repercussions.

A Tiny Bit Marvellous by Dawn French

GENRE: Contemporary, Humour | PAGES: 352

My rating: ★★★

A Tiny Bit Marvellous is a light and lovely read. Funny at minimum, hilarious at best! And surprisingly touching in places.

I found the differences in style of diary entry for each character quite refreshing if a little confusing to begin with. The characters themselves were reasonably believable though Oscar was hard to wrap my head around and Dora annoyed me as most real girls her age annoy me also! Mo was the favourite of the three for me; fairly rounded and the most relatable of them all. She underwent the most development in the book as well, pleasingly – since the others I found to be a bit lacking in that sense.

That said, not every novel HAS to be a journey or some great lesson in life. For what it is, this first fiction novel of Ms French was delightfully easy to get through, much the same as a delicious girly night in with pizza and ice cream.

 

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A Tiny Bit Marvellous

 

This is a poignant novel by Dawn French which is told through the eyes of a mother and her two teenage children. Each chapter is narrated by a different voice, telling the story of a modern family, all living in their own separate bubbles, lurching towards meltdown.

One Day by David Nicholls

GENRE: Contemporary, Romance | PAGES: 435

My rating: ★★★★

The ‘missing what’s there in front of you’ tale has been told maybe a thousand times but this one has such authenticity that the story became original in itself.

Dex and Emma are believable, realistic, and their 20-year relationship is honest and normal. When they finally get together it is beautiful but real. No movie fireworks, no daring last-minute dash across the city; it is the type of transition that ‘normal folk’ like us can relate to.

It is this quality throughout the book and the original layout in the way Dex and Emma’s story is told that makes it a treasure.

I cannot wait to watch the movie and can only hope it lives up to the four-hundred-odd pages of marvellous prose. 

 

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  One Day

 

It’s 1988 and Dexter Mayhew and Emma Morley have only just met on the night of their graduation. Tomorrow they must go their separate ways. But after only one day together, they cannot stop thinking about one another. Over twenty years, snapshots of that relationship are revealed on the same day—July 15th—of each year. Dex and Em face squabbles and fights, hopes and missed opportunities, laughter and tears. And as the true meaning of this one crucial day is revealed, they must come to grips with the nature of love and life itself.

Before I Go To Sleep by S J Watson

GENRE: Suspense | PAGES: 366

My rating: ★★★★★

This page turner of a book blew me away with its originality. Before I Go To Sleep captured and drew me in from the start–an intriguing meeting between a woman who woke not knowing herself and a man who offered an explanation.

Christine awakens to the same confusion every day until a Dr Nash returns a journal to her–a journal that bears her name, a journal that warns her not to trust the man who says he is her husband. Reading page after page in what she assumes is her own handwriting is like witnessing someone else’s life but the truths that unfold and the danger she is in is very much her own.

Each journal entry is, on its own, an event that captivates you; together, it builds and builds to a peak rather than an ending, and it doesn’t disappoint. The mystery behind Christine’s condition is solved and her future is left satisfyingly open for the reader to choose.

Even if a psychological thriller isn’t your usual, I’d urge you to read this anyway–it may well be just the story that changes your mind.

 

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Before I Go To Sleep

 

Memories define us. So what if you lost yours every time you went to sleep? Your name, your identity, your past, even the people you love – all forgotten overnight. And the one person you trust may only be telling you half the story. Welcome to Christine’s life.

Beautiful Disaster by Jamie McGuire

GENRE: Contemporary, Romance, YA | PAGES: 319

My rating: ★★★

My rating of Beautiful Disaster stands at 2.5 stars. Maybe I’m a little too scatterbrained to give a fair review right now or maybe I’d been anticipating this story for too long that my review is way too harsh… I’m unsure.

What I do know is that whilst I felt a little let down by the book in several places I cannot deny my urge for the relationship between Abby and Travis to work.

Their bond teetered dangerously on the edge of co-dependency and abusive behaviour but as the story progressed it became easier to see that these two troubled people were better off together than apart and that in itself was beautiful.

 

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Beautiful Disaster

 

The new Abby Abernathy is a good girl. She doesn’t drink or swear, and she has the appropriate number of cardigans in her wardrobe. Abby believes she has enough distance from the darkness of her past, but when she arrives at college with her best friend, her path to a new beginning is quickly challenged by Eastern University’s Walking One-Night Stand. Travis Maddox, lean, cut, and covered in tattoos, is exactly what Abby needs—and wants—to avoid. He spends his nights winning money in a floating fight ring, and his days as the ultimate college campus charmer. Intrigued by Abby’s resistance to his appeal, Travis tricks her into his daily life with a simple bet. If he loses, he must remain abstinent for a month. If Abby loses, she must live in Travis’s apartment for the same amount of time. Either way, Travis has no idea that he has met his match.

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

GENRE: Contemporary, YA | PAGES: 232

My rating: ★★★★

This was one of those books that was both sad and uplifting. Highly recommended for anyone who enjoys a coming of age story with difference and depth. *full review to come*

The Perks of Being a Wallflower

 

“I walk around the school hallways and look at the people. I look at the teachers and wonder why they’re here. Not in a mean way. In a curious way. It’s like looking at all the students and wondering who’s had their heart broken that day…or wondering who did the heart breaking and wondering why.”

Charlie is a freshman. And while he’s not the biggest geek in the school, he is by no means popular. Shy, introspective, intelligent beyond his years yet socially awkward, he is a wallflower, caught between trying to live his life and trying to run from it. Charlie is attempting to navigate his way through uncharted territory: the world of first dates and mixed tapes, family dramas and new friends; the world of sex, drugs, and The Rocky Horror Picture Show, when all one requires is that perfect song on that perfect drive to feel infinite. But Charlie can’t stay on the sideline forever. Standing on the fringes of life offers a unique perspective. But there comes a time to see what it looks like from the dance floor.

The Perks of Being a Wallflower is a deeply affecting coming-of-age story that will spirit you back to those wild and poignant roller-coaster days known as growing up.

Mrs Fry’s Diary by Mrs Stephen Fry

GENRE: Humour | PAGES: 346

My rating: ★★★★

Mrs Fry’s Diary is hilariously clever!

Taken at face value this had me giggling. Looking beneath that and actually imagining the wonderful Stephen half-cut and sat on the sofa with his hand in his pants had me rolling on the floor laughing!

The author behind the Spam-loving Edna is something of a creative genius!

 

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  mrs fry's diary

 

Stephen Fry’s secret wife speaks out at last… Enjoyed a nice cuppa this morning with a HobNob and Jeremy Kyle. There was a woman on there who’d been married 16 years without realising her husband was gay. Extraordinary! Which reminds me, it’s our 16th anniversary in a few weeks. What a coincidence. Stephen Fry – actor, writer, raconteur and wit. Cerebral and sophisticated, a true Renaissance man. Or is he? Finally, his secret double life – the womanizing, the window-cleaning, the kebabs, the karaoke – is exclusively revealed by Edna, his devoted wife and mother of his five, six or possibly seven children. These diaries take us through a year in the life of an unwitting celebrity wife, and are rumoured to include: scandalous nocturnal shenanigans, advice on childcare, 101 things to do with a tin of Spam. ‘A good diary should be like a good husband – a constant companion, a source of inspiration and, ideally, bound in leather.’ – Edna Fry

Hidden by Paul Jaskunas

GENRE: Suspense | PAGES: 240

My rating: ★★★

The author’s debut novel is well written and incredibly believable as he writes in a female voice.

The female in question, Maggie, is a shard of her former self; a troubled and tainted soul, tormented by the memories of a violent attack from her past.

As she comes to terms with that night, and the things that led her there, she is forced to peer into the recesses of her mind, and what she finds makes her question the testimony that locked her husband away for the brutal act.

Maggie is relatable as a character and all three male characters (Manny, Nate and Carson) have distinct personalities. The detail is vivid – presented in a way that isn’t long-winded and I was particularly impressed with Maggie’s internal monologue of her struggle. Her psychological state is so accurately captured that her confusion became mine. The doubt, the fear, the seizures – utterly believable.

The only disappointment for me was the ending. It felt right for Maggie to make peace with herself and her demons but somehow I was left wanting in some way.

On the whole, however, if you’re into psychological drama, this was a rather gripping read. (3.5 stars)

 

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  hidden

 

As unnerving as it is mesmerizing, “Hidden” is an evocative, emotionally charged domestic drama — a willful and traumatized woman’s painful search for the truth about the man who assaulted her one summer night. Six years after the attack, Maggie Wilson receives a call from the prosecutor who helped put her husband in jail after Maggie identified him as the man who nearly killed her. Told that another inmate has confessed to the crime and that her ex-husband will be freed, the shock plunges Maggie into memories of her stormy marriage to Nate Duke, the ambitious heir to a real estate company. Secluded in an old farmhouse that was her marital home, Maggie relives her marriage to Nate and his abusive treatment of her. But in her present, a very different man is haunting her — the born-again convict who has confessed to the crime. As his story competes with hers, Maggie pores through trial transcripts, old journals, and photo albums, trying fruitlessly to remember exactly what happened. Written in spare, elegant prose, Paul Jaskunas’s novel reads like a waking dream as Maggie is torn by the question — was it Nate? Or was it this stranger who seems to know intimate details? And what will it cost her to discover the truth? A work of searing suspense written in the heroine’s brave voice, “Hidden” is ultimately about a woman confronting the betrayal of her body and the ambiguity of her mind.

Forbidden by Tabitha Suzuma

GENRE: Contemporary, Romance, YA | PAGES: 432

My rating: ★★★★★

My god, Forbidden is amazing. Even with the very, very sensitive topic of incest and child neglect, the story as a whole was immensely touching and so intense I felt the urge to pause between chapters–yet couldn’t!

From page one, the characters came to life for me. It was impossible not to sympathise with their situation; it was as if their very lives were unfolding in front of me, and by the time Maya and Lochan actually took their relationship to the next dangerous level I was already (incredibly) accepting it. I would go as far as admitting that I wanted them to succeed in their plans for a future together.

The ending made my heart ache. It was the ultimate sacrifice to both their family unit and to each other.

The only recommending sentence I need to utter is this: if you like good books, read Forbidden–you won’t be disappointed. 

 

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Forbidden

 

She is pretty and talented – sweet sixteen and never been kissed. He is seventeen; gorgeous and on the brink of a bright future. And now they have fallen in love. But… they are brother and sister. Seventeen-year-old Lochan and sixteen-year-old Maya have always felt more like friends than siblings. Together they have stepped in for their alcoholic, wayward mother to take care of their three younger siblings. As defacto parents to the little ones, Lochan and Maya have had to grow up fast. And the stress of their lives—and the way they understand each other so completely—has also brought them closer than two siblings would ordinarily be. So close, in fact, that they have fallen in love. Their clandestine romance quickly blooms into deep, desperate love. They know their relationship is wrong and cannot possibly continue. And yet, they cannot stop what feels so incredibly right. As the novel careens toward an explosive and shocking finale, only one thing is certain: a love this devastating has no happy ending.

The Bride Stripped Bare by Nikki Gemmell

GENRE: Contemporary | PAGES: 371

My rating: ★★★★

Despite being an international bestseller, Nikki Gemmell’s The Bride Stripped Bare has received more than its fair share of negativity. There are gripes about the fact that she initially published the book under Anonymous and a lot of people found her candid sex scenes a little too much.

I disagree. For starters, the synopsis should forewarn any sex-shy reader of what they’re about to embark upon, and far from shocking, I found that her open style of writing had a certain grace within it. There is a definite beauty to be had in witnessing the kind of self-discovery that the main character made. She uncovered parts of herself that had been lingering within her all her life, that she had repressed, and she was no less than courageous to permit herself to act on those inner urges.

In a world that is now all about equality, there is still a strange tendency or expectation for women to acquiesce to a certain extent and this holds true in regards to sexual partnership. While there are some of us who are comfortable with our strong sexuality, the majority of women find themselves quietly submissive when it comes to expressing what they want or need.

The author here, with the protection of anonymity, was able to give a raw account of what her character was all about. This is not to say that she summed up the urges or fantasies of every woman but it took nerve to put her own out there for all to see.

I love the style of the book – this was the first novel I’ve ever read in second-person format and I think it added to the vivid atmosphere that Gemmell creates. Overall, a fantastic read.

 

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  The Bride Stripped Bare

 

A woman disappears, leaving behind an incendiary diary chronicling a journey of sexual awakening. To all who knew her, she was the good wife: happy, devoted, content. But the diary reveals a secret self, one who’s discovered that her new marriage contains mysteries of its own. She has discovered a forgotten Elizabethan manuscript that dares to speak of what women truly desire, and inspired by its revelations, she tastes for the first time the intoxicating power of knowing what she wants and how to get it. The question is: How long can she sustain a perilous double life?

Written on the Body by Jeanette Winterson

GENRE: Contemporary, Romance | PAGES: 192

My rating: ★★★

It took a very long time to get through Written on the Body, and even now that I’ve finished it, I still can’t be sure whether I really enjoyed it or not.

There’s no denying that there is quality in Winterson’s prose; it is poetic and unashamedly focused on emotion but there were moments when it felt a little overdone – I found myself overlooking the clever style and syntax and merely groaning and thinking: ‘get to the point, already.’

The other flaw, for me, was the lack of gender specifics; no matter how much I wanted to wrap myself up in the tale, my mind kept wandering off, following dropped clues to the character’s sex. If anything, it was an annoying and unnecessary distraction.

Overall, I’m rating this at a three, for writing skill and a story compelling enough to keep me going until the end.

If you’re into poetry, love letters and the like, or you’re enthralled about passion in general, this is for you – Winterson perfectly portrays that all-consuming, two-become-one kind of love in what can only be said to be the worship of another body, another being. It is quite beautiful to witness.

If however, on the other hand, you’re the type that cannot particularly stand to beat about the bush, I suggest you roll your eyes now, take my word for it and move on to the next book.

 

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 Written on the Body

 

The most beguilingly seductive novel to date from the author of The Passion and Sexing the Cherry. Winterson chronicles the consuming affair between the narrator, who is given neither name nor gender, and the beloved, a complex and confused married woman. “At once a love story and a philosophical meditation.”–New York Times Book Review.

Girl, Interrupted by Susanna Kaysen

GENRE: Memoir | PAGES: 168

My rating: ★★★★

With the exception of the last three entries, Susanna Kaysen’s short essays of her time spent on a psychiatric ward run in no particular order. Like her state of mind at the time she was admitted, Girl, Interrupted is a book whose content is a little chaotic and random at times and flits back and forth in time. Yet it tells us, more than adequately and without frills, of the two years she spent at McLean.

Her ideas certainly entertain; some notions I daresay linger long after finishing, and ultimately we get a glimpse into the fascinating world that we, as humans, feign detachment from.

My thoughts on this book may be biased given that I’m a sucker for literature riddled with self-examination and the problems and/or triumphs that arise from it, yet having said that, I’m certain this book would appeal to any reader wanting to delve into the mind of another.

Kaysen has, through Girl, Interrupted opened her mind and welcomed us in, wearing her ‘tainted’ sign whilst proving otherwise.

 

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  Girl, Interrupted

 

In 1967, after a session with a psychiatrist she’d never seen before, eighteen-year-old Susanna Kaysen was put in a taxi and sent to McLean Hospital. She spent most of the next two years on the ward for teenage girls in a psychiatric hospital as renowned for its famous clientele — Sylvia Plath, Robert Lowell, James Taylor and Ray Charles.

Loose Girl: A Memoir of Promiscuity by Kerry Cohen

GENRE: Memoir | PAGES: 210

My rating: ★★★★

Often a title can be deceiving; you open the book expecting one thing but finding another. This is not the case with Loose Girl. It is what it says. It lives up, quite fully (and then some), to its name.

The true account by Kerry Cohen holds every bittersweet detail of her very active sex life, from her most intimate desires to the low value she placed on herself from a young age. Through well-written prose, she demonstrated the validation she needed and sought from men throughout her life. For reasons that may have stemmed from her broken home-life and the beliefs she held about herself, she developed an all-consuming need for physical contact in order to really feel alive, but even then, it was never enough to fulfill her. She never holds back on description throughout, sharing with us the innermost workings of her mind–every paranoid thought, every desperate plea–all in the name of feeling wanted, chosen–loved.

I found this hard to read yet I could not put it down. In some instances I found myself personalising her account; I could identify with her in several ways and I find that, in itself, both worrisome and comforting. Still, it was satisfying to discover that she eventually made the necessary change and found a way to accept herself, thus eventually allowing another person to do the same. It must have taken great courage to write so openly and with such fierce honesty and for that I salute the author.

 

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  loose girl

 

For everyone who was that girl.

For everyone who knew that girl.

For everyone who wondered who that girl was.

Kerry Cohen is eleven years old when she recognizes the power of her body in the leer of a grown man. Her parents are recently divorced and it doesn’t take long before their lassitude and Kerry’s desire to stand out–to be memorable in some way–combine to lead her down a path she knows she shouldn’t take. Kerry wanted attention. She wanted love. But not really understanding what love was, not really knowing how to get it, she reached for sex instead. Loose Girl is Kerry Cohen’s captivating memoir about her descent into promiscuity and how she gradually found her way toward real intimacy. The story of addiction–not just to sex, but to male attention–Loose Girl is also the story of a young girl who came to believe that boys and men could give her life meaning. It didn’t matter who he was. It was their movement that mattered, their being together. And for a while, that was enough. From the early rush of exploration to the day she learned to quiet the desperation and allow herself to love and be loved, Kerry’s story is never less than riveting. In rich and immediate detail, Loose Girl re-creates what it feels like to be in that desperate moment, when a girl tries to control a boy by handing over her body, when the touch of that boy seems to offer proof of something, but ultimately delivers little more than emptiness. Kerry Cohen’s journey from that hopeless place to her current confident and fulfilled existence is a cautionary tale and a revelation for girls young and old. The unforgettable memoir of one young woman who desperately wanted to matter, Loose Girl will speak to countless others with its compassion, understanding, and love.

Entangled by Cat Clarke

GENRE: Contemporary, Dark, Romance, YA | PAGES: 372

My rating: ★★★

Entangled started out as what seemed like a hostage situation then slowly morphed into the internal examination of troubled Grace. The story, in her voice, tells of her journey to the point of suicide and gave a glimpse into how she finally found and made peace with herself in the end.

Grace’s voice is strong throughout, as is her character, and though her behaviour is often infuriating, it is not without cause. Her self-loathing comes through clearly, in a very real kind of light and her breakthrough at the end, though obviously very bittersweet by this point, is achingly victorious.

 

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  Entangled

 

The same questions whirl round and round in my head: What does he want from me? How could I have let this happen? AM I GOING TO DIE? 17-year-old Grace wakes up in a white room, with table, pens and paper – and no clue how she got there. As Grace pours her tangled life onto the page, she is forced to remember everything she’s tried to forget. There’s falling hopelessly in love with the gorgeous Nat, and the unravelling of her relationship with her best friend Sal. But there’s something missing. As hard as she’s trying to remember, is there something she just can’t see? Grace must face the most important question of all. Why is she here? A story of dangerous secrets, intense friendships and electrifying attraction.

Chasing Destiny by Eric Jerome Dickey

GENRE: Contemporary, Romance | PAGES: 480

My rating: ★★★★

I couldn’t put Chasing Destiny down, even if I’d wanted to. I’ve read two other books by Dickey; one was brilliant and the other I couldn’t finish. Chasing Destiny falls into the former category.

Dickey has such a way with words. The action moves at a cracking pace and the scenes are always full of dialogue, whether internal or direct, and it’s real and natural. He uses a style and dialect that adds grit and drama. His characters, whether you love to hate them or you just plain love them, they’re interesting; they’re people you’d want to talk to or eavesdrop on or whatever the case may be. Ultimately, you can’t wait to learn their story.

Destiny, the title character, is the severely troubled, fifteen-year-old daughter of a couple going through a really ugly divorce. Keith, her father, is in love with the main character, Billie. Billie is pregnant. As the ‘other woman’, Billie has everything ‘that’ title could possibly bring with it including several mad attacks on her life. When Billie and Destiny finally collide, Billie is left with the truth: family first.

As twisted as this family is, Dickey splendidly portrays the bond of blood and the lengths to which we would all go, to protect the ones we love.

 

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  Chasing Destiny

 

Billie is as notorious for her beauty as she is for the hot yellow Ducati motorcycle she rides down L.A.’s meanest streets. Tough and talented, she does things her way. Until an unplanned pregnancy spins her life out of control. Her problem: Her lover Keith’s divorce decree has been revoked, forcing him to choose between Billie and his dangerously manipulative wife, Carmen, along with their troubled and deceptive daughter, Destiny, a fifteen-year-old dancing on the edge of womanhood. Horrific things happen when Keith’s daughter disappears in the company of low friends in dark places. And in chasing Destiny, Billie, Keith, and Carmen find their lives inextricably linked by a dangerous and seductive pursuit-at any speed, at any cost.

Sum: Tales From The Afterlives by David Eagleman

GENRE: ??? | PAGES: 110

My rating: ★★★★

Sum reads like an amazingly original set of musings, about life after death. Far from the conventional concepts of Heaven and Hell, this takes us into forty imagined Afterlife settings, fraught with seemingly fresh circumstances that then slowly filter out into the familiar chaos of life as we know it. An absolute mind-fuck.

  Sum

 

In the afterlife you may find that God is the size of a microbe & unaware of your existence. Or you may find the afterlife contains only those people whom you remember. In these tales, David Eagleman kicks over the chessboard of traditional notions and offers us a dazzling lens through which to see ourselves here & now.

The Colossus and Other Poems by Sylvia Plath

GENRE: Poetry | PAGES: 84

My rating: ★★★★

I found the poetry of The Colossus absolutely haunting. I love how Plath can take something–like nature for instance like other poets have–but she instead shows us the darker, bleaker (more intense) side. There is such power in her words and she has never shied away from that which scares the rest of us. Her raw, unfiltered view of the world has me falling in love with her work all over again.

I do not feel quite as connected to this collection as I am with Ariel but there is no doubt of her brilliance. Her poetry is like a slow, night-time walk inside her mind and sometimes the things that lurk there are frightening; frightening but beautiful.

My favourite from this collection is Medallion.

 

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  Colossus

 

With this startling, exhilarating book of poems, which was first published in 1960, Sylvia Plath burst into literature with spectacular force. In such classics as “The Beekeeper’s Daughter,” “The Disquieting Muses,” “I Want, I Want,” and “Full Fathom Five,” she writes about sows and skeletons, fathers and suicides, about the noisy imperatives of life and the chilly hunger for death. Graceful in their craftsmanship, wonderfully original in their imagery, and presenting layer after layer of meaning, the forty poems in The Colossus are early artifacts of genius that still possess the power to move, delight, and shock.

Sweet Valley Confidential by Francine Pascal

GENRE: Contemporary, Romance | PAGES: 293

My rating: ★★★

In true guilty-pleasure fashion, I hide my face as I quietly admit to having enjoyed this book. Sweet Valley Confidential reads like classic Pascal with a random swear word thrown in here and there in an attempt to qualify it as adult fiction. The writing was often wanting in places and I found myself yearning for grittier prose and more satisfying action but nevertheless, the story as a whole drew me in like a good piece of gossip.

It was often predictable, save one (rather juicy) surprise – no spoilers – but I enjoyed the adult elements of the girls and the flip-switch personality in Elizabeth.

On prose alone I’d have been tempted to dish out a single measly star; but add in the fact that I have a sizable stack of Sweet Valley fan years behind me, and also the fact that we FINALLY see character development in the Wakefield sisters, I’m gonna go ahead and rate this a three!

 

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  Sweet Valley Confidential

 

It’s been ten years since the Wakefield twins graduated from Sweet Valley High, and a lot has happened. For a start, Elizabeth and Jessica have had a falling out of epic proportions, after Jessica committed the ultimate betrayal, and this time it looks like Elizabeth will never be able to forgive her. Suddenly Sweet Valley isn’t big enough for the two of them, so Elizabeth has fled to New York to immerse herself in her lifelong dream of becoming a serious reporter, leaving a guilt-stricken Jessica contemplating the unthinkable: life without her sister. Despite the distance between them, the sisters are never far from each other’s thoughts. Jessica longs for forgiveness, but Elizabeth can’t forget her twin’s duplicity. Uncharacteristically, she decides the only way to heal her broken heart is to get revenge. Always the ‘good’ twin, the one getting her headstrong sister out of trouble, Elizabeth is now about to turn the tables…

The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides

GENRE: Contemporary, YA | PAGES: 250

My rating: ★★★★

I read The Virgin Suicides from cover to cover in a matter of hours. The tale was grippingly told several years after the book’s incident, through the voice of a group of neighbouring, then teen-aged boys. Their somewhat disturbing obsession with a group of sisters on their street helped them discover pieces of the mystery surrounding the girls’ eventual deaths.

The story centres on the sad breakdown of the Lisbon family after one of five sisters tries and then succeeds, to end her life one summer in the ’70’s. The remaining four girls become progressively isolated within their home, often coming outdoors only in the dead of night, prisoners in their own house at the hands of their (understandably) overprotective parents. Their only contact with the outside world is through a ham radio, conversation via record-playing on the telephone and strange light messages to the boys, including a final message that alerts the boys to their planned ‘escape’.

The style in which it was written was as though a report was being delivered. It was open, ‘chatty’ even, full of the character of the narrators, even though we had no clear image of what they looked like or even which of them were telling the story. Their fascination with the Lisbon sisters translated so that I, too, became fascinated. Throughout, I was given the impression that these girls might be saved, purely because the narrator once believed as much.

Although this never was to be, the ending was not disappointing or dissatisfying. Sad though it was, it was inevitable that these girls, who were already dead inside–for whatever reason–would meet their premature end.

 

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The Virgin Suicides

 

The haunting, humorous and tender story of the brief lives of the five entrancing Lisbon sisters, The Virgin Suicides, now a major film, is Jeffrey Eugenides’s classic debut novel. The shocking thing about the girls was how nearly normal they seemed when their mother let them out for the one and only date of their lives. Twenty years on, their enigmatic personalities are embalmed in the memories of the boys who worshipped them and who now recall their shared adolescence: the brassiere draped over a crucifix belonging to the promiscuous Lux; the sisters’ breathtaking appearance on the night of the dance; and the sultry, sleepy street across which they watched a family disintegrate and fragile lives disappear.

Comfort Food by Kitty Thomas

GENRE: Dark, Erotica | PAGES: 192

My rating: ★★★★★

~ ‘Am I to be sane and miserable in a world of somebody else’s creation or am I to be crazy, and in my own strange way, free?’ ~

After reading a few reviews of Comfort Food, I just had to check it out, if only, at the time, to sate my curiosity. Far from regretting it, I was actually and absolutely fascinated by it.

This is the first book I’ve read based around Stockholm Syndrome (which is interesting in and of itself) and whilst I’ve delved into a couple of erotica novels, I can usually take ’em or leave ’em. This one though was amazing for the psychology within the story.

The (very readable) protagonist, Emily, is strong and smart and when she is drugged and kidnapped then broken down she knows what’s coming next. The man who stole her from the life she knew is never violent; he provides her with everything she needs but at a cost, and in such a way it makes Emily feel as though she gave him actual permission. She becomes willing to play his game, first out of necessity, then out of her own need. She knows what’s happening as it’s happening yet she’s as much a slave to it as someone who had no clue of the process. She becomes a victim of the syndrome she’s heard so much about but she comes to accept and crave both it and her captor.

Her captor, whose name we never learn, actually stirred something a bit like sympathy within me. I was so drawn in by the root of his problem (as hugely immoral as his problem was) and I really hoped for a breakthrough of some sort. There was, however, no such cliche; much like real-life cases, the sociopathic behaviour brought its own twisted reward, though I felt so connected with the story by this point, that I actually found myself hankering after the same ending as the victim, Emily, did. 

 

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Comfort Food

 

Emily Vargas has been taken captive. As part of his conditioning methods, her captor refuses to speak to her, knowing how much she craves human contact. He’s far too beautiful to be a monster. Combined with his lack of violence toward her, this has her walking a fine line at the edge of sanity. Told in the first person from Emily’s perspective, Comfort Food explores what happens when all expectations of pleasure and pain are turned upside down, as whips become comfort and chicken soup becomes punishment.

The Twilight Saga Official Illustrated Guide by Stephenie Meyer

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, YA | PAGES: 543

My rating: ★★★★

The Twilight Saga Official Illustrated Guide does two things for me: it fills the gaps of the Saga, and it feeds that closet-ridden, Twilight-hungry part of myself in one huge, all-you-can-eat sitting.

I wasn’t crazy about some of the illustrations. And repetition in the coven profile crossovers was bordering on mundane, but overall this was hugely enjoyable for any Twilight fan–Twihard or not. 

 

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  The Twilight Saga Official Illustrated Guide

 

Fans of the #1 New York Times bestselling Twilight Saga will treasure this definitive official guide! This must-have hardcover edition-the only official guide-is the definitive encyclopedic reference to the Twilight Saga and provides readers with everything they need to further explore the unforgettable world Stephenie Meyer created in Twilight, New Moon, Eclipse, Breaking Dawn, and The Short Second Life of Bree Tanner. This comprehensive handbook-essential for every Twilight Saga fan-is full-color throughout with nearly 100 gorgeous illustrations and photographs and with exclusive new material, character profiles, genealogical charts, maps, extensive cross-references, and much more.

The Other Hand by Chris Cleave

GENRE: Contemporary | PAGES: 355

My rating: ★★★★

From the first sentence to the last I was gripped. The Other Hand is told in two strong voices – that of Nigerian Little Bee and English Sarah. The way their lives and worlds came together, clashing but never merging despite all efforts, was both beautiful and disturbing to witness.
 

 

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From the author of the international bestseller Incendiary comes a haunting novel about the tenuous friendship that blooms between two disparate strangers—one an illegal Nigerian refugee, the other a recent widow from suburban London.

Bart Simpson’s Guide to Life: A Wee Handbook for the Perplexed by Matt Groening

GENRE: Humour | PAGES: 187

My rating: ★★★★

Made me cackle! I’m sure a twenty-something female was not the target audience but I’d recommend it to any fan of the show!

Bart Simpson's Guide to Life

 

Starved for the whole truth, man? Take a bite out of this bitsy but beefy package, brimming with morsels of wit, wisdom and worldly knowledge brought to you by the one and only Bartholomew J. Simpson. Get the hard–knocks facts of life from the guy who’s seen it all, heard it all, done it all and denies it all. (The “J” stands for “jenius”…)

Ariel by Sylvia Plath

GENRE: Poetry | PAGES: 105

My rating: ★★★★

Bleak yet powerful and intense, Ariel by Sylvia Plath is, by far, my favourite collection of poetry. Undoubtedly, Sylvia Plath has a unique way with words. She transforms them into bewitching lyrics that resonate in endless and uniquely personal ways.

I read these poems over and over, caught up in the imagery she creates, the emotion she evokes. Each time, I take away a little more than I did the time before. Her work speaks to me (and countless others). Her open, uncensored outpouring of raw feeling is perfectly translated to the page.

Whilst each of her poems have meaning, I have some particular favourites in Ariel. The poem Elm spoke to me and so did Tulips, and since no amount of analysis can do her poetry justice, so instead, here’s my favourite piece from this collection:

Elm

I know the bottom, she says. I know it with my great tap root:
It is what you fear.
I do not fear it: I have been there.

Is it the sea you hear in me,
Its dissatisfactions?
Or the voice of nothing, that was your madness?

Love is a shadow.
How you lie and cry after it
Listen: these are its hooves: it has gone off, like a horse.

All night I shall gallop thus, impetuously,
Till your head is a stone, your pillow a little turf,
Echoing, echoing.

Or shall I bring you the sound of poisons?
This is rain now, this big hush.
And this is the fruit of it: tin-white, like arsenic.

I have suffered the atrocity of sunsets.
Scorched to the root
My red filaments burn and stand, a hand of wires.

Now I break up in pieces that fly about like clubs.
A wind of such violence
Will tolerate no bystanding: I must shriek.

The moon, also, is merciless: she would drag me
Cruelly, being barren.
Her radiance scathes me. Or perhaps I have caught her.

I let her go. I let her go
Diminished and flat, as after radical surgery.
How your bad dreams possess and endow me.

I am inhabited by a cry.
Nightly it flaps out
Looking, with its hooks, for something to love.

I am terrified by this dark thing
That sleeps in me;
All day I feel its soft, feathery turnings, its malignity.

Clouds pass and disperse.
Are those the faces of love, those pale irretrievables?
Is it for such I agitate my heart?

I am incapable of more knowledge.
What is this, this face
So murderous in its strangle of branches?——

Its snaky acids hiss.
It petrifies the will. These are the isolate, slow faults
That kill, that kill, that kill.

— Sylvia Plath

 

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Ariel by Sylvia Plath

 

“In these poems…Sylvia Plath becomes herself, becomes something imaginary, newly, wildly and subtly created. — From the Introduction by Robert Lowell

The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath

GENRE: Memoir | PAGES: 234

My rating: ★★★★★

I went into this novel rather blindly and I have to say I preferred it that way–it allowed me to make up my own mind. To say that I ‘enjoyed’ this book would seem inappropriate but nevertheless, I’ll admit that I did.

I find Plath’s style thought-provoking and full of imagery. In one review I saw moments ago, it was noted that there was no mention of a diagnosis and hardly any discussion of treatment. I have to say, in the book’s defence, that it would seem that Plath didn’t need to label her protagonist’s illness. Everything seemed to be written as thought processes and emotion and this worked incredibly well given that depression (from my own personal experience) is such an inward and isolating illness. Plath’s likening of this to a bell jar fits perfectly.

She captures the chaos of the mind and puts it on the page so beautifully that I often wanted to read a sentence more than once just to absorb it all over again.

Overall, a brilliant novel and one that will stay with me for a long time.

 “To the person in the bell jar, blank and stopped as a dead baby, the world itself is a bad dream.” 

 

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The Bell Jar

 

Esther Greenwood is at college and is fighting two battles, one against her own desire for perfection in all things – grades, boyfriend, looks, career – and the other against remorseless mental illness. As her depression deepens she finds herself encased in it, bell-jarred away from the rest of the world. This is the story of her journey back into reality. Highly readable, witty and disturbing, The Bell Jar is Sylvia Plath’s only novel and was originally published under a pseudonym in 1963. What it has to say about what women expect of themselves, and what society expects of women, is as sharply relevant today as it has always been.

My Name is Memory  by Ann Brashares

GENRE: Contemporary, Fantasy, Romance | PAGES: 336

My rating: ★★★

My Name is Memory is a book about reincarnation. I love books with this theme.

Overall, the plotline was pretty original and Daniel’s character was so complex and interesting to get to know. With each chapter of his life that interest multiplied and his search for Sophia grew ever more compelling.

If there is one downfall it would, for me, have to be the anti-climactic ending–I was left feeling as though there was a page missing… a shame really since the rest of the book was so good.

“Love demands everything, they say, but my love demands only this: that no matter what happens or how long it takes, you`ll keep faith in me, you`ll remember who we are, and you`ll never feel despair.”

My Name is Memory

 

‘You have been with me from the very first life. You are my first memory every time, the single thread in all of my lives.’

Interview with the Vampire by Anne Rice

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal | PAGES: 308

My rating: ★★★★

Interview with the Vampire is unlike any other vampire novel I’ve read. It is full of sumptuous detail and the language is deliciously lyrical. Anne Rice’s style of writing possesses a quality that makes you feel as though you’re in the room hearing the story first-hand.

You can fully connect with the vampire telling his story, and you can appreciate the soul-destroying side of a blood drinker’s eternal existence.

Whilst I enjoyed the second half of the book more than the first in terms of pacing, overall Interview with the Vampire is a brilliant story, and its characters are as intriguing as the vampire itself.

Looking forward to devouring all of the other books in this series.

 

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Interview with the Vampire

 

In a darkened room a young man sits telling the macabre and eerie story of his life – the story of a vampire, gifted with eternal life, cursed with an exquisite craving for human blood.

Witch Child (Witch Child, #1) by Celia Rees

GENRE: Fantasy, YA | PAGES: 240

My rating: ★★★★

I thoroughly enjoyed Witch Child for the captivating tale it told. The whole story had just enough fact amongst the fiction to make it believable as a true case. I liked that. Mary was strong and a real survivor–I cared about what happened to her from page one.

This is a memorable favourite for me and one of the best books about witches I’ve read.

 

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Witch Child

 

Enter the world of young Mary Newbury, a world where simply being different can cost a person her life. Hidden until now in the pages of her diary, Mary’s startling story begins in 1659, the year her beloved grandmother is hanged in the public square as a witch. Mary narrowly escapes a similar fate, only to face intolerance and new danger among the Puritans in the New World. How long can she hide her true identity? Will she ever find a place where her healing powers will not be feared?

Book Review: Taming the Beast by Emily Maguire

GENRE: Dark, Romance | PAGES: 336

My rating: ★★★★

Taming the Beast is raw and unashamed. I practically ate this book in one sitting.

Sarah and Daniel begin their affair and it is Daniel’s own twisted sexual preferences that start to shape Sarah into who she is about to become. He has such power and influence over her, both in the authoritative sense and in the sense of the idealistic, intelligent lover.

When Daniel leaves, Sarah’s life becomes a series of empty one night stands in a subconscious search for something she can never find and when he returns to her and resumes his behaviour, she is grateful where she shouldn’t be.

Whilst this book dealt with the taboo issues of teacher/student relationships and had more than its fair share of strong and abusive language and BDSM scenes, it was more than justified. Only through Emily Maguire’s gritty, violent prose could we see just how tortured a single soul can become when conditioned from the impressionable age of fourteen to accept abuse, any abuse, as love.

 

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Taming the Beast

 

At the tender age of fourteen, Sarah Clark is seduced by her thirty-eight-year-old English teacher, Daniel Carr, and becomes entangled in an illegal, erotic, passionate, and dangerous affair—a vicious meeting of minds and bodies that ends badly. Devastated by grief and longing, Sarah embarks upon a series of meaningless self-abasing sexual encounters, hoping to reclaim the intensity of that first relationship. Then, seven years later, Carr unexpectedly returns and Sarah is drawn again into a destructive coupling. Now that she is no longer an innocent young girl, is she strong enough to finally tame the beast within her? A modern Lolita, Taming the Beast is an emotionally unflinching and alluring tale that introduces a powerful new writer.