A Darker Shade of Magic by V. E. Schwab

GENRE: Fantasy | PAGES: 400

My rating: ★★★

A Darker Shade of Magic has such a promising and intriguing premise. Parallel magical versions of the city of London? A mysterious magician of sorts who can walk between these worlds? Sign me up!

I went into this book expecting nothing but the highest form of original storytelling and while, to an extent, that is what I got, I couldn’t help feeling just a little disappointed.

A Darker Shade of Magic is, without a doubt, creative and original, but there was something about the story itself that, for me, lagged in more than a few places. While the concept of it is compelling, I found myself trudging through passages, waiting for everything to begin. Don’t misunderstand me—it is a very well-written book, but a lot of what we learn, particularly in the first half of the novel, feels like backstory. So much of it felt like a history lesson rather than a direct link to the characters in that present time and because of this, it lacked tension and suspense.

That said, once these stones of history have been laid, the magic of the story finally filters through. We finally get to see real connections between the characters—and those characters are well-drawn. I love Kell’s sense of family-oriented duty along with that undercurrent of curiosity and longing for who and what he really is. I love Lila’s strength and the subtle but defining change she undergoes as she aids him. But Holland is by far the most intriguing character for me. His complexity and grey morality make him the most interesting character in the book and I hope (can almost predict) that there’s more of him to come in future books.

The many mysterious details of the world are beguiling, rivalling the likes of the Harry Potter world, albeit on a smaller scale. And the distinctive feeling conjured up within each separate London is brilliantly executed, as is the description of magic.

Still, I just couldn’t fully connect with the book. While I enjoyed it and can appreciate certain elements, there was something about it that kept me removed from the story despite wanting the opposite. Perhaps book two and three will resonate with me a little better, having already set up the worlds in which Kell lives in book one.

Here’s hoping.

 

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a darker shade of magic

 

Kell is one of the last Antari—magicians with a rare, coveted ability to travel between parallel Londons; Red, Grey, White, and, once upon a time, Black. Kell was raised in Arnes—Red London—and officially serves the Maresh Empire as an ambassador, traveling between the frequent bloody regime changes in White London and the court of George III in the dullest of Londons, the one without any magic left to see. Unofficially, Kell is a smuggler, servicing people willing to pay for even the smallest glimpses of a world they’ll never see. It’s a defiant hobby with dangerous consequences, which Kell is now seeing firsthand. After an exchange goes awry, Kell escapes to Grey London and runs into Delilah Bard, a cut-purse with lofty aspirations. She first robs him, then saves him from a deadly enemy, and finally forces Kell to spirit her to another world for a proper adventure. Now perilous magic is afoot, and treachery lurks at every turn. To save all of the worlds, they’ll first need to stay alive.

A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance | PAGES: 421

My rating: ★★★

I desperately wanted to love A Court of Thorns and Roses. It’s a fantasy romance and a Beauty and the Beast retelling of sorts. There is such hype for the entire series to the point where I convinced myself it couldn’t possibly be anything but fantastic.

Sadly, for me, it fell a little flat.

Don’t get me wrong—it’s a decent story, compelling enough to keep me reading until the end and maybe even venturing into the rest of the series. But I can’t pretend I’m not disappointed.

Feyre is an underwhelming main character. She has potential; she’s a skilled hunter and a pretty decent human being—showcased in the provisions and sacrifices she made for her ungrateful family. But between her early stupid choices, her (sometimes) redundant narration, and her artist’s eye seeing the world ‘in colour’… she became—frankly—irritating. Yes. She’s a painter. She knows the name of ten different shades of blue. I get it. I don’t need it shoved down my throat.

The Beast—Tamlin—should have had the potential to make me swoon. He’s obviously gorgeous, he’s powerful, and so on and so on but there’s something not nearly as beastly about him as I’d been anticipating. Lucien on the other hand is a great character—and Rhys is even better. Both Lucien and Rhys have far more depth, and their complexities add intrigue. Even their personalities are more interesting than Tamlin’s, although I get that Tamlin is probably intentionally silent and brooding.

The author does a good job of setting up the world of the Fae. There was a little too much exposition for my personal liking, with side characters who served little purpose other than the relaying of important information to the protagonist. That said, the extravagant wealth and enchantment of the Fae world comes through and the scenes in nature are written beautifully if a little overdone at times. I loved the different creatures of the world and I liked the setup of the various Courts with their corresponding seasons and magic. I also liked the simmering romance between Tamlin and Feyre. It isn’t as epic as I’d hoped for but all in all, it carried me through the book.

I’m in no hurry to pick up the next instalment in this series but the setup for continuation of the storyline is intriguing enough to keep it on my to-read pile, and with much of the world-building out of the way, book two—and the subtle promise of the implications with Rhys—might make for an exciting follow-up to A Court of Thorns and Roses.

 

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  a court of thorns and roses

 

When nineteen-year-old huntress Feyre kills a wolf in the woods, a beast-like creature arrives to demand retribution for it. Dragged to a treacherous magical land she only knows about from legends, Feyre discovers that her captor is not an animal, but Tamlin—one of the lethal, immortal faeries who once ruled their world. As she dwells on his estate, her feelings for Tamlin transform from icy hostility into a fiery passion that burns through every lie and warning she’s been told about the beautiful, dangerous world of the Fae. But an ancient, wicked shadow grows over the faerie lands, and Feyre must find a way to stop it . . . or doom Tamlin—and his world—forever.

Ruin and Rising by Leigh Bardugo

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance, YA | PAGES: 432

My rating: ★★★★

Ruin and Rising, the final book in The Grisha Trilogy, wraps up the series in a neat little bow. The story picks up right where we left off in book two and Alina, Mal, and their band of misfits have yet another dilemma to get out of and one last amplifier to track down.

I loved the friendships that developed in this book and both major twists in the book were heartrending and superbly written.

Spoiler Alert ahead!

The ending is… a happily-ever-after, I guess, if bittersweet. All the loose ends are tied, all is right with the world, and Alina gets what she’s longed for.

And yet—call me deranged—I longed for more. I longed for something else entirely. I longed for a completely different scenario—with the Darkling.

Despite his flaws and the horrors of what he’d become; despite the twisted manipulation and his hunger for power at any cost; despite all of his darkness, I wanted Alina’s balancing light to be his salvation.

So, while the series was wonderful and I enjoyed it immensely, the ending leaves me dissatisfied and a little disappointed. Although, clearly, I’m a hopeless romantic with some major psychological issues, so unless you’re like me, you have nothing to worry about. The World of the Grisha has become a fast favourite of mine and I’ve added Six of Crows (another series within the Grishaverse) to my to-read pile.

 

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  ruin and rising

 

The capital has fallen. The Darkling rules Ravka from his shadow throne. Now the nation’s fate rests with a broken Sun Summoner, a disgraced tracker, and the shattered remnants of a once-great magical army. Deep in an ancient network of tunnels and caverns, a weakened Alina must submit to the dubious protection of the Apparat and the zealots who worship her as a Saint. Yet her plans lie elsewhere, with the hunt for the elusive firebird and the hope that an outlaw prince still survives. Alina will have to forge new alliances and put aside old rivalries as she and Mal race to find the last of Morozova’s amplifiers. But as she begins to unravel the Darkling’s secrets, she reveals a past that will forever alter her understanding of the bond they share and the power she wields. The firebird is the one thing that stands between Ravka and destruction—and claiming it could cost Alina the very future she’s fighting for.

Siege and Storm by Leigh Bardugo

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance, YA | PAGES: 401

My rating: ★★★★★

Siege and Storm is five-star worthy storytelling. Book two trumps book one. The pacing is faster, more thrilling and intense; the world building is still luxuriously detailed but more subtle and controlled, and the characters breathe with life.

Alina steps up in this book and we get to see her embrace who she is. She possesses a newfound strength in this book and she wears it well. I love the rising conflict between her and Mal. I love the addition of chameleonic Nikolai. I love the intriguing but sinister allure of the Darkling.

In short, I loved this book. Even more than the first. I read it in a day and I’m about to pull an all-nighter for book three.

 

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  siege and storm

 

Darkness never dies. Hunted across the True Sea, haunted by the lives she took on the Fold, Alina must try to make a life with Mal in an unfamiliar land. She finds starting new is not easy while keeping her identity as the Sun Summoner a secret. She can’t outrun her past or her destiny for long. The Darkling has emerged from the Shadow Fold with a terrifying new power and a dangerous plan that will test the very boundaries of the natural world. With the help of a notorious privateer, Alina returns to the country she abandoned, determined to fight the forces gathering against Ravka. But as her power grows, Alina slips deeper into the Darkling’s game of forbidden magic, and farther away from Mal. Somehow, she will have to choose between her country, her power, and the love she always thought would guide her–or risk losing everything to the oncoming storm.

Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance, YA | PAGES: 369

My rating: ★★★★

The World of the Grisha is rich with culture and magic. From page one, Shadow and Bone is enchanting—full of wonder and originality in the midst of a new, exciting setting rife with intrigue and danger. I couldn’t get enough at first.

Then, for me, the story lagged with too many chunks of scene setting and description and I found myself disconnected with the characters. This momentary lapse was short, however.

On coming back to it, the story gathered pace. Alina met new people, she struggled with training, she came into her strength, then made some plot-twisting discoveries. I was hooked once more and the initial overdone descriptive style gave way to a sprinkling of original world building amidst an intriguing plot line. The rest of the book is brilliantly written and I devoured the final two-thirds in one sitting.

Alina is like most YA protagonists. She begins her journey as a somewhat weak average teenager and finds herself and her power along the way. She is innocent and naive but also likeable and believable, and by the end of this first book, she shows enormous intelligence and courage.

I love Mal. There’s an extra section at the end that showcases his character perfectly. A letter to Alina. He is honourable and strong and obviously the ‘perfect’ match for Alina. (Note the quote marks, please.)

Yet, my favourite character by far, is the Darkling. He walks that thin grey line of morality and while the depth of his complexities seems to have only been touched upon, I’m hoping the rest of the series will do him the justice he deserves. I’m already quite in love with him.

‘Make me your villain.’ — The Darkling

 

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shadow and bone

 

Surrounded by enemies, the once-great nation of Ravka has been torn in two by the Shadow Fold, a swath of near impenetrable darkness crawling with monsters who feast on human flesh. Now its fate may rest on the shoulders of one lonely refugee. Alina Starkov has never been good at anything. But when her regiment is attacked on the Fold and her best friend is brutally injured, Alina reveals a dormant power that saves his life—a power that could be the key to setting her war-ravaged country free. Wrenched from everything she knows, Alina is whisked away to the royal court to be trained as a member of the Grisha, the magical elite led by the mysterious Darkling. Yet nothing in this lavish world is what it seems. With darkness looming and an entire kingdom depending on her untamed power, Alina will have to confront the secrets of the Grisha . . . and the secrets of her heart. Shadow and Bone is the first installment in Leigh Bardugo’s Grisha Trilogy.

The Scarlet Thread by D. S. Murphy

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance, YA | PAGES: 384

My rating: ★★★★

The Scarlet Thread is fast-paced and utterly compelling, and more than that, it is steeped in rich Greek mythology.

Kaidance has the gift of the Fates. She spends years of her life detesting who she is. She is strong but she is unaware of her full potential. Still, she is refreshingly proactive. I love her voice. She is not as naive as most YA protagonists and her smarts are believable—linked to every experience she’s ever encountered in her short life.

The world she’s thrown into is like a step back in time—an immersion into Greek mythology. The characters are intriguing and their true identities are sprinkled throughout the story in a way that makes this book impossible to put down. The story is layered and compelling, centred not just on Kaidance but also that of a centuries-spanning war.

My only gripe is the cliffhanger ending but that’s purely because I’m desperate to know how this story plays out.

   the scarlet thread

 

My name is Kaidance Monroe, and sometimes when I touch people, I see how they die. After I saw my little brother’s death but failed to stop it, my parents abandoned me to a juvenile detention facility. I don’t let people touch me anymore. Not my fingertips, not my skin, not my heart. Just before I turned 18, I got a visit from a cute guy, who tricked me into giving up my secrets. He said I was special, but he wasn’t the only one searching for me. I barely escaped with my life. Now I’m in a mansion, learning how to control my abilities – abilities so powerful, even the gods are jealous. I didn’t mean to make anyone fall for me. Certainly not my would-be killer. And I never imagined how far he would fall.

Into the Fire by Jeaniene Frost

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance | PAGES: 389

My rating: ★★★★

Into the Fire. We meet at last. Despite a series-finale being eagerly anticipated, there’s always a hint of trepidation when first opening the book. You’re filled with questions and worries like, Will it satisfy the wait? Will it live up to the awesomeness of the rest of the series? Will everyone fucking die?

I am obviously a stupid little worry wart.

Into the Fire is yet another unputdownable firecracker from Jeaniene Frost.

The story picks up where we left off in Bound by Flames and once more, we plunge headlong into action and antics with Leila and Vlad.

I am (still) blown away by my obsession with Vlad. His character never fails to enthral me on every level, be it his engaging presence, his self-assured acceptance of everything he is (the good and the bad), or the sheer complexity of his past. The many layers of his personality are intoxicating and in this series finale, he doesn’t disappoint.

His love for Leila knows no bounds. It is all-consuming, selfish even—and Vlad makes no apology for that. It is who he is—no more, no less. He is still arrogant and controlling and volatile but it is rooted in the hardships he’s been dealt over the centuries. It doesn’t read as a gimmick or a cop-out or a romanticised flaw because it is a truly deep and multi-layered history. Everything he is, is everything he had to become in order to cope, and instead of trying to change him, Leila embraces his flaws and loves him unconditionally.

It helps that she doesn’t squeak like a mouse in his presence either. She can hold her own, both with him and on the battlefield. Her strength shines in this book and her abilities reach new heights, even as enemies continue to use her as a weapon against Vlad.

A new element to the series is the inclusion of magic. It is refreshing and adds yet more excitement, further enriching the entire Night Huntress world and its mythology. I enjoyed Ian’s role in the story, too. He is funny and outlandish but his character adds more than comic relief—already there’s a visible and intriguing depth to who he is and I’m more than geared up for the upcoming spin-off series with him. (Night Rebel for anyone who doesn’t know.)

While I’m sad and disappointed that this is where Vlad and Leila’s story ends, their finale is epic and satisfying, and the series, as a whole, is one I’ll be rereading many times over.

 

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 Into the Fire

 

In the explosive finale to New York Times bestselling author Jeaniene Frost’s Night Prince series, Vlad is in danger of losing his bride to an enemy whose powers might prove greater than the Prince of Vampires’ . . .In the wrong hands, love can be a deadly weapon. For nearly six hundred years, Vlad Tepesh cared for nothing, so he had nothing to lose. His brutal reputation ensured that all but the most foolhardy stayed away. Now, falling in love with Leila has put him at the mercy of his passions. And one adversary has found a devastating way to use Vlad’s new bride against him. A powerful spell links Leila to the necromancer Mircea. If he suffers or dies, so does she. Magic is forbidden to vampires, so Vlad and Leila enlist an unlikely guide as they search for a way to break the spell. But an ancient enemy lies in wait, capable of turning Vlad and Leila’s closest friends against them . . . and finally tearing the lovers apart forever.

You Are Mine by Janeal Falor

Genre: Fantasy, ya | Pages: 370

My rating: ★★★★

You Are Mine is an engaging read with some interesting themes. Alongside the slow-burning (my favourite kind) romantic sub-plot, the central theme in this book is discrimination: of women, race, social status, even magical ability.

Set in a fantasy world within a time setting where the novelty of electricity is yet to wear thin, the protagonist begins her tale with a blood test with a difference. If her blood is potently magical, she will marry ‘well’ under an arrangement by her father, taking the traditional giving away of the bride to new extremes, with women traded from one man to another like cattle. Despite possessing magic, women have no worldly power—their only purpose in life is procreation and obedience.

When Serena’s original arranged marriage is upended, she is betrothed to another—an Envadi, Zade, native of the rumoured Barbarian race. His culture and his display of rare kindness and free will gives Serena a new lease of life, and she slowly begins to realise that the only barbarians in her world are men like her father.

I enjoyed Serena’s development as she progressed from a naive and fearful girl to a confident woman. Despite being strong for her siblings, oppression has taken its toll, leaving her mistrusting, often submissive, and in constant fear of men and the threat of punishment. 

The supposed crimes for which women are being reprimanded are as extreme as the punishments themselves, and the society in this world is outrageous. Yet, the concepts throughout the story—slavery, racism, oppression—are rooted in real world history. I loved the overall theme, particularly since we get to see Serena stand her own against everything.

This is part of a series, one book for every sister in Serena’s family. Had there been a follow up in her POV I’d have been inclined to get it. As a standalone novel, the story is immersive and the ending, despite falling a little short in terms of the romantic element, is still, overall, satisfying.

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you are mine book cover

Serena knows a few simple things. She will always be owned by a warlock. She will never have freedom. She will always do what her warlock wishes, regardless of how inane, frivolous, or cruel it is. And if she doesn’t follow the rules, she will be tarnished. Spelled to be bald, inked, and barren for the rest of her life—worth less than the shadow she casts.

Then her ownership is won by a barbarian from another country. With the uncertainty that comes from belonging to a new warlock, Serena questions if being tarnished is really worse than being owned by a barbarian, and tempts fate by breaking the rules. When he looks the other way instead of punishing her, she discovers a new world. The more she ventures into the forbidden, the more she learns of love and a freedom just out of reach. Serena longs for both. But in a society where women are only ever property, hoping for more could be deadly.

Uprooted by Naomi Novik

GENRE: FANTASY | PAGES: 448

My rating: ★★★★★

Uprooted was the perfect blend of fantasy and fairy tale. I loved it. The story begins with the brief history of the routine taking of a girl by the Dragon. Agnieszka eventually meets him, and under the flimsy rumours of all the village and all the taken girls before her, believes she should fear for her life and her virtue.

Our Dragon doesn’t eat the girls he takes, no matter what stories they tell outside our valley.

Instead, what awaits her is magic. She possesses it and so does the Dragon, and as she settles into her role as apprentice, she learns that the real danger is the Wood—a living breathing entity which threatens her life and the lives of everyone in her village. The Dragon is a protector but so focused on the task he’s been given, he has, in his immortal existence, become cold and distant. Little by little, Agnieszka breaks down the Dragon’s walls and learns to embrace her power instead of fearing it.

The story has been likened to a loose retelling of Beauty and The Beast, and I can see the resemblance there in the most basic of elements–it was this that initially appealed to me–but this book goes above and beyond the fairy tale.

The magic in this book is beautiful. The element of it is brought to life with wondrous detail, steeped in the essence of the entire novel: nature. Nature and magic are fully intertwined; even spells are demonstrated as the growth of nature–an intricate blossoming of a flower or a ferocious eruption of moss and decay–the description is vivid and imaginative.

Agnieszka begins her journey as a fearful, cautious girl, reluctant to step into the spotlight. When she embraces who she truly is, she shows great strength–a wilful, stubborn bravery, and a tender understanding toward the often arrogant Dragon.

Her relationship with him is believable, realistically and beautifully written, evolving first into mutual respect and trust, struggling with their own misgivings before fully embracing and accepting their inevitable love.

This is one of the best books I’ve read this year and my only disappointment is that it is not part of a series—I would gladly jump back into this fascinating, beautiful world.
 

 uprooted book cover

Agnieszka loves her valley home, her quiet village, the forests and the bright shining river. But the corrupted Wood stands on the border, full of malevolent power, and its shadow lies over her life. Her people rely on the cold, driven wizard known only as the Dragon to keep its powers at bay. But he demands a terrible price for his help: one young woman handed over to serve him for ten years, a fate almost as terrible as falling to the Wood.

The next choosing is fast approaching, and Agnieszka is afraid. She knows – everyone knows – that the Dragon will take Kasia: beautiful, graceful, brave Kasia, all the things Agnieszka isn’t, and her dearest friend in the world. And there is no way to save her. But Agnieszka fears the wrong things. For when the Dragon comes, it is not Kasia he will choose.

From the author of the Temeraire series comes this hugely imaginative, engrossing and vivid fantasy novel, inspired by folk and fairy tales. It is perfect reading for fans of Robin Hobb and Trudi Canavan.

BOUND BY FLAMES BY JEANIENE FROST

GENRE: PARANORMAL, FANTASY, ROMANCE | PAGES: 342

My rating: ★★★★★

As predicted, book three of the Night Prince series doesn’t disappoint. Who knew I was clairvoyant? Or maybe, Jeaniene Frost is just that good. Bound by Flames is brilliant.

Leila is even tougher than I gave her credit for, and she continues to impress me with her resilience, even though the villain is evil personified and events take a far darker, more twisted turn than before.

“Have you ever seen an animal skinned?” Vlad interrupted, his voice icily pleasant. “It’s a bloody, brutal business under normal circumstances, but imagine if the animal were alive and screaming. Then imagine that it wasn’t an animal, but the person you loved being repeatedly slashed and hacked so that their skin could be ripped away faster than it could heal.”

And it gets worse!

These horrific acts trigger the madman in Vlad, and every scene is riddled with tension. This is then brilliantly balanced with his openness later on, and with Leila, he finally tears down those last few walls. Any misgivings regarding Vlad (not that I have any) are finally rectified when he relays (in detail this time) the atrocities of his past, and it becomes even more apparent that his (ironically) cold exterior, and his arrogant and (at times) downright medieval attitude, all stem from not only his past but his most basic need to protect. There are many more moments where his vulnerability streaks through, and it’s beautiful, and yet his power in this book is phenomenal.

Some of my anger drained away as I stared into his eyes. They were green with fury, yes, but something else lurked in them. An emotion I rarely saw in Vlad. Fear.

“You aren’t just my weakness, Leila. You are my destruction, because if I were to lose you, it would finish me.”

Needless to say, I am a fangirling mess right now, since book four isn’t out until October.

Is it October yet?

vlad
 

bound by flames book cover

Play with fire, pay the price.

Leila’s years on the carnie circuit were certainly an education. What she didn’t learn: how to be a vampire, or how to be married to the most famous vampire of them all. Adjusting to both has Leila teetering on a knife edge between passion and peril, and now the real danger is about to begin…

Vlad must battle with a centuries-old enemy whose reach stretches across continents and whose strength equals his own. It isn’t like Vlad to feel fear, but he does…for Leila, because his enemy knows she is Vlad’s greatest weakness. As friend and foe alike align against him—and his overprotectiveness drives Leila away—Vlad’s love for his new bride could be the very thing that dooms them both…

TWICE TEMPTED BY JEANIENE FROST

GENRE: PARANORMAL, FANTASY, ROMANCE | PAGES: 360

My rating: ★★★★

So. Good. Whilst Twice Tempted is not as action-packed in terms of vampire ass-kicking, there’s a strong build-up of anticipation, particularly in the first half of this book. There were some slow moments in this one, lulls which weren’t present in the first in the series, but they were few and far between, and didn’t for a minute detract from the enjoyment of the story.

Leila’s strength comes through in this second book even more than the first, and her independence and assertiveness is admirable and refreshing to read. She might be more accepting of Vlad than that which is humanly possible, but somehow it’s believable. Again, the complexity of Vlad’s character and Leila’s own apparent thirst for revenge helps her to understand him in a way no other woman has before, and in this book, she sees so much more of what makes him who he is—the good, and the very, very bad.

Vlad doesn’t fail to excite, and as more of his horrific past is unveiled, his depth becomes more and more appealing.

His smile was tantalizing and frightening, like being whipped and finding out you enjoyed the pain.

As ruler, he is one shade shy of psychopathic and yet, underneath the brutality of his actions against his enemies, lies unwavering loyalty to those who follow him. And now, underneath his experience of century-sweeping loss, his love for Leila is a force onto itself, despite the fact that he believes she loves only a fraction of the man he really is.

“You claim to love me, but the man you love doesn’t exist.”

As a couple, their relationship has similar dynamics to Night Huntress Cat and Bones, (particularly when it comes to over-protection and jealousy—that’s vampires for you) but there’s not enough of it yet to even begin to scratch the surface of Cat and Bones’ chemistry. I’m hopeful though, since Vlad, for me, blows Bones right out of the water, and that’s not easily done. Vlad’s intensity—his energy—is unrivaled.

Overall, I’m thrilled by the whole series so far. Book three is lined up and waiting, and I have a feeling it won’t disappoint.

description

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 Twice Tempted

 

Dating the Prince of Darkness has its challenges…

Leila’s psychic abilities have been failing her, and now she isn’t sure what the future holds. If that weren’t enough, her lover, Vlad, has been acting distant. Though Leila is a mere mortal, she’s also a modern woman who refuses to accept the cold shoulder treatment forever–especially from the darkly handsome vampire who still won’t admit that he loves her.

Like choosing between eternal love and a loveless eternity…

Soon circumstances send Leila back to the carnival circuit, where tragedy strikes. And when she finds herself in the crosshairs of a killer who may be closer than she realizes, Leila must decide who to trust– the fiery vampire who arouses her passions like no other or the tortured knight who longs to be more than a friend? With danger stalking her every step of the way, all it takes is one wrong move to damn her for eternity.

ONCE BURNED BY JEANIENE FROST

GENRE: PARANORMAL, FANTASY, ROMANCE | PAGES: 346

My rating: ★★★★

Jeaniene Frost   has done it again, by which I mean written something that consumes me to the point of not sleeping, and ultimately, has me drooling all over the Kindle Store for the next book in the series. Once Burned was a riveting read, from start to finish, and despite the fact that I missed the Night Huntress   element in the beginning, it didn’t take me long to form an attachment to Leila. She’s no Cat (because come on, Cat rocks!) but Leila has the same headstrong, feisty qualities I’ve come to expect from Frost’s protagonists, and she definitely delivers. Even more satisfying, we get to see Leila’s inner strength and resilience develop throughout the book.

And did I mention Vlad? As in Vlad the Impaler, the original prince of darkness. The ultimate vampire, Dracul—with benefits.

vladtepeshnightprince

And he’s no brooder. I love me some of that angst and broodiness, but Vlad takes the game to a whole new level. He’s the opposite of broody. He doesn’t sit around pining over his lost humanity. He revels in it. And it’s freakin’ glorious. Something about the way he owns his vampirism, his abilities, and his power, it takes masculinity to new heights. And yet, there’s a softer side. He keeps it on a short leash but it’s there, and it has Leila (and me) yearning to crack his exterior. Not too much though, obviously, because who wants domesticity from a vampire, right?

Vlad trumps Bones in this series, and that’s saying a lot because Bones has been my go-to vamp for many a fantasy! He’s Buffy’s Spike and Vampire Diaries’ Damon Salvatore rolled into one. But with Vlad… His complex personality is nothing short of schizophrenic. He’s complicated and multi-faceted to the point of frustration, but it lends intrigue and fascination. You can’t help but want to dig deeper and overlook the monstrosities of some of his actions. (Which doesn’t say a lot about me, but hey, I’m human. It’s my job to get lost in the grey area, particularly if there’s a vampire in it.)

Bottom line: this book is exciting, every bit as exciting as the NH series, and I cannot get a copy of book two fast enough. 

 

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 Once Burned

 

She’s a mortal with dark powers…

After a tragic accident scarred her body and destroyed her dreams, Leila never imagined that the worst was still to come: terrifying powers that let her channel electricity and learn a person’s darkest secrets through a single touch. Leila is doomed to a life of solitude…until creatures of the night kidnap her, forcing her to reach out with a telepathic distress call to the world’s most infamous vampire…

He’s the Prince of Night…

Vlad Tepesh inspired the greatest vampire legend of all—but whatever you do, don’t call him Dracula. Vlad’s ability to control fire makes him one of the most feared vampires in existence, but his enemies have found a new weapon against him—a beautiful mortal with powers to match his own. When Vlad and Leila meet, however, passion ignites between them, threatening to consume them both. It will take everything that they are to stop an enemy intent on bringing them down in flames.

Sky Song by Sharon Sant

GENRE: FANTASY, PARANORMAL | PAGES: 170

My rating: ★★

I hate giving two-star ratings but compared to others I’ve reviewed as 3-star, Sky Song just didn’t work for me. It was written well enough, and some parts were original and inventive. The rest, at least for me, lacked flow, pacing, and character depth. I found it hard to connect with the main three characters, and despite having an intriguing storyline, I could not immerse myself within it. That said, it was intriguing enough to keep me reading until the end, so don’t be put off until you’ve tried it yourself.

 

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A strange-eyed boy with no memory of his true identity or real parents, Jacob could have no idea of the mortal danger he has been in every day of his fifteen years. Now that danger has found him and suddenly he doesn’t know who he can trust and what is real anymore. All he knows is that his new identity is almost as terrifying as the peril unleashing it has brought. Caught in the universal power struggle of an ancient race of beings and a destiny demanded of him that he does not want, he must fight to protect his own life and everyone he holds dear. But when the time comes, will he be strong enough to make the sacrifices that saving them will demand?

Eve: The Awakening (Eve, #1) by Jenna Moreci

GENRE: FANTASY, PARANORMAL | PAGES: 547

My rating: ★★★★

Eve: The Awakening is the debut novel from Jenna Moreci, and it is a HELL of a debut. The story follows the titular Eve, an advanced subspecies of humans named after the Greek chimeras. Eve has grown up an orphan after the cataclysmic death of her parents, sparking both her gift of telekinesis and the beginning of a lifelong battle to survive. Since the age of eight, she has braved her way through infamy, ridicule, bullying, and death threats, all whilst learning to control her gift, and dealing with the hardships of being an outcast—and then, just as she thinks she’s found a way to lead a normal life, in step a bazillion freaking aliens: Interlopers. Slimy, toothy, winged, giant-ass aliens all of whom are hell-bent on turning the human race against Eve and her kind, and then doing the world the ‘grand favour’ of eliminating chimeras in the goriest possible way.

And this, is the joy-ride that is Eve: The Awakening.

The writing is superbly paced; it gallops through the story, high on adrenaline, crafting scenes of heart-pounding tension and unimaginable gore. If though, you think this is the only thing it has going for it, you’re terribly wrong—the book is laced with humour, upbeat drama, chemistry, and ultimately—the gem of every great book—it is littered with countless moments of raw emotion (no, I’m not crying—there’s something in my eye). The characters are well-rounded, and fully developed, each so very individual, and I won’t attempt to sum them up here, as I cannot do them justice, but the ensemble of personalities and quirks are brilliant, and Eve, the protagonist, is as complex as they come. Through her, the book touches on broader themes such as discrimination and oppression, adding yet another layer of depth to the story.

I thoroughly enjoyed this from start to finish; the book has a compelling beginning, and though it slows in early chapters as we’re discovering Eve’s world, it isn’t long before we’re hurtling through the story again at chimera speed.

The only downside, as far as I can see, is that book two of this dynamic (see what I did there?) series isn’t yet available.

This is honestly the best book I’ve read since Jeaniene Frost‘s Night Huntress series (Halfway to the Grave), and I’d urge anyone to check out EVE, even if (like me) you’re not a hard-core fan of the sci-fi genre. EVE easily straddles several genres at once, and as well as being entertaining, moving, and all-around excellent writing, I’d recommend this regardless, if only to introduce you to the fabulous-ness that is Percy! Best. Character. Ever.

Seriously—read it. 

 

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Eve: The Awakening

 

Eve is an outcast. A chimera.
After years of abuse and rejection, 19-year-old Evelyn Kingston is ready for a fresh start in a new city, where no one knows her name. The esteemed Billington University in sunny Southern California seems like the perfect place to reinvent herself—to live the life of an ordinary human.

But things at Billington aren’t as they seem. In a school filled with prodigies, socialites, and the leaders of tomorrow, Eve finds that the complex social hierarchy makes passing as a human much harder than she had anticipated. Even worse, Billington is harboring a secret of its own: Interlopers have infiltrated the university, and their sinister plans are targeted at chimeras—like Eve.

Instantly, Eve’s new life takes a drastic turn. In a time filled with chaos, is the world focusing on the wrong enemy? And when the situation at Billington shifts from hostile to dangerous, will Eve remain in the shadows, or rise up and fight?

Witch Song by Amber Argyle

GENRE: FANTASY, PARANORMAL, ROMANCE, YA | PAGES: 305

My rating: ★★★★

I read a lot of YA novels, and the beginning stages of this one made me believe it was too specifically aimed at a more teenage demographic. The early chapters seemed juvenile in part and lacked depth. I nearly abandoned it.

I’m so glad I didn’t.

The lacklustre start gave way to a host of well-developed main characters, and intriguing secondary characters, set in a wonderful (?)medieval world of magic. The plot has Senna at the centre, the last witch, standing against Espen and her followers to reclaim the witches’ natural power and affinity with nature, and free the rest of her kind. Senna develops from a naive and innocent young girl to a witch with a powerful song, and it is believable and relatable because of the struggles she endures to get there. Through loss and abandonment, she pushes past her fears and insecurities, despite them never fully leaving her. Her insecurity is a flaw which follows her throughout the book, but it is justified, due to her sheltered past, and the ill-treatment she receives as a witch-born.

Witch Song is a beautifully written book, with its magic based on the pagan tradition and style of nature. I’d recommend it to anyone who, like me, finds themselves drawn to books with old witch magic. 

 

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 Witch Song

 

Brusenna is the last.

All the other witches have been captured, their songs stolen and twisted from harmony and growth into chaos and death. She alone must stand against an evil much older and darker than anything she could ever imagine—an evil every witch before her has failed to vanquish.

Brusenna must be the first.

The Girl with All the Gifts by M. R. Carey

GENRE: FANTASY, PARANORMAL, SUSPENSE | PAGES: 

My rating: ★★★★

Dystopian thriller. Zombie apocalypse. Sounds familiar? Yes, I suppose it does. It’s been done, over and over, and I’ve usually steered happily and carefully in the other direction. The Girl with All the Gifts, however, is not one of those books. It is a dystopian thriller, and there are hungry flesh-eating, zonked-out crazies, but then, there’s also Melanie.

Melanie has a unique take on the world in which she lives – her daily life consists of being forcibly strapped to a wheelchair, and manoeuvred between a bare cell and a classroom filled with kids ‘like her’, where she learns Maths and English, and hears of the stories of the past, including Britain’s past: the world as we know it. The country has broken down, fallen into ruin, and Melanie believes that she is one of the lucky few being kept safe inside her ‘home’; safe from the ‘hungries’ outside the base fences.

MILD SPOILER AHEAD…

What she doesn’t know is just how similar she is to the very creatures the fences keep out. She is Test Subject Number One in a desperate last-resorts research program to save the human race, and the world Melanie dreams of beyond those fences are so much farther from her reach than she realises. Despite intentions of those around her, Melanie breaks free and learns, little by little, who and what she is, eventually surpassing the expectations of all who would have her condemned. Her Pandora-like unleashing of ‘gifts’ onto the world is, at its least, a brave and carefully-calculated move to prolong life, and at most, poetic justice for the innocent.

This fresh, new angle on zombies is wonderfully written. Not only does this book open up a closed door into the other side of zombie fiction, but it explores the concepts of a developing child and her bond with those around her. The type of restraint Melanie displays in the face of her most basic, animalistic instinct is usually only ever depicted in tales of true love of the romantic kind; here, the nurturing and unconditional bond shared between Melanie and her teacher, Helen, is akin to that of a mother and child, and it is refreshingly original in this sense.

Overall, if you want to dip your toes into zombie-infested waters, don’t hesitate to try this one: it is thrilling and horrifying, and emotionally heart-wrenching all at once, and best of all, it shouldn’t give you too many nightmares. 

 

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 The Girl with All the Gifts

 

Melanie is a very special girl. Dr. Caldwell calls her “our little genius.”

Every morning, Melanie waits in her cell to be collected for class. When they come for her, Sergeant Parks keeps his gun pointing at her while two of his people strap her into the wheelchair. She thinks they don’t like her. She jokes that she won’t bite, but they don’t laugh.

Melanie loves school. She loves learning about spelling and sums and the world outside the classroom and the children’s cells. She tells her favorite teacher all the things she’ll do when she grows up. Melanie doesn’t know why this makes Miss Justineau look sad.

The Girl with All the Gifts is a sensational thriller, perfect for fans of Stephen King, Justin Cronin, and Neil Gaiman.

Ultraviolet by R. J. Anderson

GENRE: FANTASY, PARANORMAL, ROMANCE, YA | PAGES: 410

My rating: ★★★★

Ultraviolet — beautiful, and poetic, weaves the story of a girl with the phenomenal gift of synesthesia. The writing crackles across the pages and the senses–like sherbet, like fireworks; an emotional explosion of the every-day as we’ve never seen it. Yet, everything Alison encounters with her unique sensory system is so expertly translated onto the page, that her ‘super-power’ becomes relatable. I am in awe of the delicious detail, and the originality, and never have I been more surprised at the direction a book takes. This genre-straddling twist is effortless, quite spell-binding in fact, and I’m certain that no review anywhere could do this book justice without spoiling the ending.

This genre-straddling twist is effortless, quite spell-binding in fact, and I’m certain that no review anywhere could do this book justice without spoiling the ending.

 

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 Ultraviolet

 

Once upon a time there was a girl who was special. This is not her story.

Unless you count the part where I killed her.

Sixteen-year-old Alison has been sectioned in a mental institute for teens, having murdered the most perfect and popular girl at school. But the case is a mystery: no body has been found, and Alison’s condition is proving difficult to diagnose. Alison herself can’t explain what happened: one minute she was fighting with Tori — the next she disintegrated. Into nothing. But that’s impossible. Right?

Up From the Grave (Night Huntress #7) by Jeaniene Frost

GENRE: FANTASY, PARANORMAL, ROMANCE | PAGES: 372

My rating: ★★★★

On finally completing this series with Up From the Grave, I had to hold off writing a review for a couple of days for fear of gushing like the book nerd I am. Yet, several days later, I am still full of nothing but gushing love for Cat and Bones and the Night Huntress world, and I’m having to read two books alongside each other just to fill the gaping book hole left in my soul. (I’m nothing if not dramatic.)

On a more serious note – as if being stuck in book limbo isn’t serious – book seven of this series did not disappoint. There was the usual action, the usual Cat vs. villain scenario (although this villain had his introduction in the previous part), and whilst there aren’t as many toe-curling scenes featuring Bones (aka Buffy’s Spike – yum!) as in previous books (hello, married life), there is that same distinct connection between him and Cat, which by this point has developed and escalated into something altogether more magical than vampire sex. (Did I just say that? I take it back.)

I loved the addition of Katie (even though I could see it coming a mile off), and I liked Cat’s changing instincts surrounding this – it was written in such a way that this transition into her new role was smooth and natural.

Something I did not see coming was this:

SPOILER AHEAD!

“A shock wave knocked me off Bones and sent me sprawling against the other side of the pier. Concussion grenade, I mentally diagnosed. One amped up enough for vampires. Madigan had really upgraded his toys, but before I could scramble back to Bones, I saw something that froze me into immobility. A line appeared in his blood- spattered cheek, dark as pitch and snaking across his skin like a crack in a statue. Then another line appeared, and another one. And another. No. It was the only thought my mind was capable of producing as black lines began to appear all over his skin, zigzagging and splintering off into new, merciless paths. I’d seen the same thing happen to countless vampires before, usually after twisting a silver knife in their hearts, but denial made it impossible for me to believe the same was happening to Bones. He couldn’t be slowly shrivelling before my gaze, true death changing his youthful appearance into something that resembled pottery clay baked too long in an oven. My immobility vanished, replaced by terror such as I’ve never felt. I vaulted across the pier, snatching Bones into my arms while my tears joined the rain in soaking his face. “NO!” Even as the scream left me, the changes in him grew worse. His muscular frame felt like it deflated, the hard lines of his body becoming rubbery before they began to shrink. I clutched him tighter, sobs turning my tears scarlet, while something started to hammer in my chest. It felt as though I were being pummelled on the inside with hard, steady blows. My heartbeat, a part of me registered. It had been silent for almost a year, but now, it pounded more strongly than it ever had when I was a human. Another cry tore out of me when Bones’s skin cracked beneath my hands before sloughing off onto the wooden planks. Frantic, I tried to put it back on, but more flesh began to peel away faster than I could hold it together. Muscle and bone peeked out from those widening spaces, until his face, neck, and arms resembled a gaping slab of meat. But what tore through me like a fire that would never stop burning was his eyes. The dark brown orbs I loved sank into their sockets, dissipating into goo. My scream, high- pitched and agonised, replaced the scrambling sounds of soldiers setting up position around me. I didn’t try to stop them. I sat there, clutching handfuls of what now looked like dried leather, until all I could see underneath Bones’s bullet- riddled clothes was a pale, withered husk. Dimly, I heard Madigan yell, “I said no silver ammo! Who the fuck fired those rounds?” before everything faded except the pain radiating through me. It made the agony I felt when I’d nearly burned to death a blissful memory. That had only destroyed my flesh, but this tore through my soul, taking every emotion and shredding it with knowledge that was too awful to bear. Bones was gone. He’d died right before my eyes because I insisted on taking Madigan down my way.”

If I read this once, I read it at least five more times before I would allow myself to believe it and try to move on. Even then, I was unwilling to let go.

By the time I got to p.149, I was a ridiculous, teary mess. Read the book–you’ll see.

Needless to say, this whole series is on my ‘favourites’ pile. It’s easy reading, feisty, witty, and jam-packed with supernatural action and chemistry. The heroine is strong and sassy, and knows how to handle herself (yay, feminism!), and best of all, these non-sparkling vampires know how to bite.

 

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 Up From the Grave

 

Lately, life has been unnaturally calm for vampires Cat Crawfield and her husband Bones. They should have known better than to relax their guard, because a shocking revelation sends them back into action to stop an all-out war…

A rogue CIA agent is involved in horrifying secret activities that threaten to raise tensions between humans and the undead to dangerous heights. Now Cat and Bones are in a race against time to save their friends from a fate worse than death… because the more secrets they unravel, the deadlier the consequences. And if they fail, their lives—and those of everyone they hold dear — will be hovering on the edge of the grave.

One Grave at a Time (Night Huntress #6) by Jeaniene Frost

GENRE: FANTASY, PARANORMAL, ROMANCE | PAGES: 389

My rating: ★★★★

Whilst book five was slightly disappointing because of a distinct lack of raw connection with Cat and Bones, book six, One Grave at a Time, puts the series back on form.

Once again, Cat and Bones are up against yet another cunning enemy, this time in the form of Kramer – a powerful ghost, disillusioned writer of the historic Malleus Maleficarum, and cruel, twisted rapist and murderer. He has haunted the plane of the living for years, yet annually, on Halloween, he has the ability to cross over into a corporeal form, allowing for his centuries-old ritual of the torture and burning of women, under the archaic system of witch-hunting.

Of all of the villains in this series so far, I enjoyed reading this one the most – perhaps because of my own interests surrounding the witch trials and the unspeakable history of the crimes against those women.

Cat, as always, puts her own (undead) life on the line to hunt down this madman, in yet another lightning joyride from Jeaniene Frost. 

 

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 One Grave at a Time

 

Having narrowly averted an (under)world war, Cat Crawfield wants nothing more than a little downtime with her vampire husband, Bones. Unfortunately, her gift from New Orleans’ voodoo queen just keeps on giving–leading to a personal favor that sends them into battle once again, this time against a villainous spirit.

Centuries ago, Heinrich Kramer was a witch hunter. Now, every All Hallows Eve, he takes physical form to torture innocent women before burning them alive. This year, however, a determined Cat and Bones must risk all to send him back to the other side of eternity–forever. But how do you kill a killer who’s already long dead?

This Side of the Grave (Night Huntress, #5) BY Jeaniene Frost

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance | PAGES: 357

My rating: ★★★

Jeaniene Frost continues to distract me from everything else I should be doing, although I have to admit that part 5 in the series was not as great for me as those before it.

There’s still plenty of action and the writing is superb as always, but unlike the others, this book was a little dull in some places. There are some great scenes, don’t get me wrong, but things don’t seem to pick up until about halfway through. Whether this is simply because of the general plot of this book, or whether it is a reflection of the characters’ developing maturity, I don’t know – perhaps a bit of both – either way, it was slightly disappointing after eating books 1 to 4 like a ravenous book-beast.

I also found myself somewhat distracted by the new additions to the story, in particular, Kira, and Denise’s new ‘situation’. For anyone who read the side novels involving Spade and Denise, and Mencheres and Kira, this wouldn’t be a problem. Maybe it’s my own damn fault for rushing on with this series instead of branching out and getting the full overall story – I just didn’t have enough of an interest in these side characters to read full novels based around them alone. It would have made more sense to read the Night Huntress books 1 to 4, then go to Night Huntress World First Drop of Crimson and Eternal Kiss of Darkness before reading this book as suggested on the author’s site. Oops.

Overall, this won’t stop me from continuing with the series, but I am hoping book six captures more of what drew me to this series in the first place, zoning back in on Cat and Bones.

 

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  This Side of the Grave

 

Danger waits on both sides of the grave.

Half-vampire Cat Crawfield and her vampire husband Bones have fought for their lives, as well as for their relationship. But just when they’ve triumphed over the latest battle, Cat’s new and unexpected abilities threaten to upset a long-standing balance . . .

With the mysterious disappearance of vampires, rumors abound that a species war is brewing. A zealot is inciting tensions between the vampires and ghouls, and if these two powerful groups clash, innocent mortals could become collateral damage. Now Cat and Bones are forced to seek help from a dangerous “ally”; the ghoul queen of New Orleans herself. But the price of her assistance may prove more treacherous than even the threat of a supernatural war . . . to say nothing of the repercussions Cat never imagined.

Destined for an Early Grave (Night Huntress #4) BY Jeaniene Frost 

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance | PAGES: 355 

My rating: ★★★★

After having read several reviews that led me to believe the fourth instalment in this series was less than average, I went into this one partly prepared for disappointment. Happily, it never came. Destined for an Early Grave is just as brilliant, in my opinion, as the previous three books.

**Spoiler Ahead**

Cat and Bones are back on form after book three’s slightly lacking absence of steamy scenarios and chemistry. Cat’s transformation is edgy and original, and full of surprise, and her relationship with Bones is put to the test in even more ways.

Jeaniene Frost has done it again, and this is turning out to be one of my favourite series ever.

 

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  Destined for an Early Grave

 

Her deadly dreams leave her in grave danger.

Since half-vampire Cat Crawfield and her undead lover Bones met six years ago, they’ve fought against the rogue undead, battled a vengeful Master vampire, and pledged their devotion with a blood bond. Now it’s time for a vacation. But their hopes for a perfect Paris holiday are dashed when Cat awakes one night in terror. She’s having visions of a vampire named Gregor who’s more powerful than Bones and has ties to her past that even Cat herself didn’t know about.

Gregor believes Cat is his and he won’t stop until he has her. As the battle begins between the vamp who haunts her nightmares and the one who holds her heart, only Cat can break Gregor’s hold over her. She’ll need all the power she can summon in order to bring down the baddest bloodsucker she’s ever faced . . . even if getting that power will result in an early grave.

Halfway to the Grave BY Jeaniene Frost

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance | PAGES: 358

My rating: ★★★★

EDIT: Having now devoured the series, Halfway to the Grave is the gateway book into one of my favourite paranormal series EVER. 

Catherine – otherwise known as Cat, Cathy and Kitten; also known as a half-breed, with a penchant for killing other vampires after having discovered that she is the product of a vampire rape. With her prejudice against all of the undead fully drummed into her by her mother, and Cat’s own self-loathing of her very being, she hunts the vampires by night, hoping that someday she’ll cross paths with the one whose blood flows through her.

Instead, she finds Bones: master vampire, hundreds of years old, and more than a match for Cat’s skills, he corners her into a deal: she can live, and hunt, but only on his terms, as part of an ongoing eleven-year search of his own.

This book was refreshingly and amazingly jam-packed with action and chemistry.

Cat is strong and feisty; her temperament makes her unpredictable, and her internal narration is funny, sassy, and a real joy to read. Her spunk gets her into dangerous fixes, yet it is truly liberating, in a generation of fragile-humans-in-the-paranormal-world, to see her get herself out of them, for the majority of the time.

Bones, as the male lead is charismatic and charming, keeping all the mystery and danger of everything a vampire should encompass – a little remnant of Buffy’s Spike. His English wit and vampiric allure is pleasurably more-ish, and set against Cat’s own fiery nature, it is a truly exciting combination.

I loved this book immensely. Each character is well established, and the conflicting prejudices of both species – human and vampire – and then the eventual mingling of the two, really adds interest. I admired the way the author does not hold out on the characters’ fitting opinions on topics in society – politics, religion… It is so refreshing to read something that doesn’t hold back in a bid to cause as little offence as possible. This made the characters really come to life; it added realism.

The ending was left wonderfully open, without being frustratingly so, and I just cannot wait to continue with this series – certainly the best so far – in terms of action, romance, humour, sex, and all things supernatural.

 

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  Halfway to the Grave

 

Flirting with the Grave…

Half-vampire Catherine Crawfield is going after the undead with a vengeance, hoping that one of these deadbeats is her father – the one responsible for ruining her mother’s life. Then she’s captured by Bones, a vampire bounty hunter, and is forced into an unholy partnership.

In exchange for finding her father, Cat agrees to train with the sexy night stalker until her battle reflexes are as sharp as his fangs. She’s amazed she doesn’t end up as his dinner – are there actually good vampires? Pretty soon Bones will have her convinced that being half-dead doesn’t have to be all bad. But before she can enjoy her newfound status as kick-ass demon hunter, Cat and Bones are pursued by a group of killers. Now Cat will have to choose a side . . . and Bones is turning out to be as tempting as any man with a heartbeat.

The Lives She Left Behind by James Long

GENRE: Fantasy, Romance | PAGES: 472

My rating: ★★★★★

Bloody BRILLIANT! The Lives She Left Behind is the follow-up to the phenomenal Ferney.

It. Is. Brilliant! It really is!

Sixteen years on from the birth of Gally’s daughter, a troubled young girl called Jo finds herself drawn to the Somerset village of Pen Selwood.

The ancient, magical bond of a centuries-old love pulls Jo’s true self through her fears, and back to the root of it all–back to Ferney.

Beautifully written and steeped in history, this book is easily as good, if not better, than the first one!

 

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 The Lives She Left Behind

 

In a Somerset village, a teenage boy confronts a teacher with a story he should know nothing about. The boy’s impossible knowledge uncovers memories Michael Martin has done his utmost to forget – and soon propels him into danger. As Martin confronts his past once more, three girls arrive in the village of Pen Selwood, one of them drawn by an ancient instinct to find a man called Ferney. Her actions reignite a love story, an instinct that cannot be broken, irrespective of the hurt and danger it brings to those around them…

A Nomadic Witch (A Modern Witch, #4) by Debora Geary

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance | PAGES: 263

My rating: ★★★★

I am enjoying the A Modern Witch series even more as it goes on.

I love the Witch Central base formation over the course of the last four books. It really lends a Disney quality to the series. The characters are even more well-rounded than in the beginning and it feels like I’ve come to know them.

Moira is the grandmother of all grandmothers; Nell is a fierce and fiery superwoman, and Devin–ahh, Devin… sigh…

Really, those three are my personal favourites, but every one of Geary’s creations now resonates with true, individual character.

This book, A Nomadic Witch, saw development in Marcus, perpetual grump with a big but broken heart, having lost his twin brother to the Mists forty years earlier.

The arrival of a baby from the Mists that only he can care for opens a channel into the pain he has tried to bury since he was five, and he learns to love the witchling as his own. The problem is that she is a traveller of the Mists just as his twin was and now he has to fight to keep her safe or risk losing himself again.

I liked the fact that this book didn’t shy away from his pain. As light-hearted as the series is, I feel it gave it so much more depth; part of the reason I also really liked A Reckless Witch.

I haven’t downloaded the others yet… as much as I love them I find the continuous new characters a little tedious; I intend to complete the series eventually though after a little break away from the Disney movie warmth.

*Having angst-monkey withdrawal symptoms.*

 

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  A Nomadic Witch (A Modern Witch, #4)

 

Spring brings a traveller to Nova Scotia – a tiny babe who will turn Marcus’s life upside down and reincarnate the horrifying events of his past. Can Marcus find his way through the pain to love and healing? And can the witching community finally learn to keep their astral travellers safe? A Nomadic Witch is book four of the top-rated A Modern Witch series. Light contemporary fantasy with a good dose of humour, a little romance, and characters you won’t want to leave.

A Reckless Witch (A Modern Witch, #3) by Debora Geary

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance | PAGES: 304

My rating: ★★★★

One word: Devin! I have such a crush on the reckless, free-spirited man-boy! He becomes an honorary brother to the titular Reckless Witch in Geary’s third installment of the A Modern Witch series.

Excessive ‘cookie eating’ and ‘punk witchling’ name tags aside, I have only good things to say about this series so far. And they’re getting better every time. If you’re in the mood for a lighthearted, heartwarming read with humour, family values, and modern magic thrown in the mix–this is it.

I’m hooked. And I’m usually a drama junkie, angst-monkey. But I just can’t help myself. 🙂

 

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 A Reckless Witch (A Modern Witch, #3)

 

With great power comes great responsibility. So says the tradition of witching. One teenage witch missed that lesson… As a child, Sierra Brighton traveled the world. She swam with the baby whales, danced in storm funnels, and lived in complete magical freedom. And then Momma died and Sierra ended up in foster care, an unhappy and very secret witch. Fetched by Nell’s spell, she’ll no longer need to do magic on lonely beaches – but can Sierra learn to use her power safely? Or will her reckless blood put Witch Central at risk?

A Discovery of Witches (All Souls Trilogy, #1) by Deborah Harkness

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance | PAGES: 602

My rating: ★★★★

I am enjoying this series so far. A Discovery of Witches was intriguing from the very beginning although sometimes the storytelling was a bit long-winded. That said, it kept my interest and now I simply must continue the adventure. Matthew is typically hot-headed and overprotective, and his knowledge and experiences are amazingly written. Diana is on a self-discovering journey and each piece of magic and witchcraft is captured on the page in fine detail.

The pair made a fine couple to read about (even though Matthew’s abstinence makes me want to scream).

I can’t say it’s the best ‘witchy’ book I’ve ever read but it IS the best in a long time.
 

 

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 A Discovery of Witches

 

A richly inventive novel about a centuries-old vampire, a spellbound witch, and the mysterious manuscript that draws them together. Deep in the stacks of Oxford’s Bodleian Library, young scholar Diana Bishop unwittingly calls up a bewitched alchemical manuscript in the course of her research. Descended from an old and distinguished line of witches, Diana wants nothing to do with sorcery; so after a furtive glance and a few notes, she banishes the book to the stacks. But her discovery sets a fantastical underworld stirring, and a horde of daemons, witches, and vampires soon descends upon the library. Diana has stumbled upon a coveted treasure lost for centuries-and she is the only creature who can break its spell.

The Twilight Saga Official Illustrated Guide by Stephenie Meyer

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal, YA | PAGES: 543

My rating: ★★★★

The Twilight Saga Official Illustrated Guide does two things for me: it fills the gaps of the Saga, and it feeds that closet-ridden, Twilight-hungry part of myself in one huge, all-you-can-eat sitting.

I wasn’t crazy about some of the illustrations. And repetition in the coven profile crossovers was bordering on mundane, but overall this was hugely enjoyable for any Twilight fan–Twihard or not. 

 

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  The Twilight Saga Official Illustrated Guide

 

Fans of the #1 New York Times bestselling Twilight Saga will treasure this definitive official guide! This must-have hardcover edition-the only official guide-is the definitive encyclopedic reference to the Twilight Saga and provides readers with everything they need to further explore the unforgettable world Stephenie Meyer created in Twilight, New Moon, Eclipse, Breaking Dawn, and The Short Second Life of Bree Tanner. This comprehensive handbook-essential for every Twilight Saga fan-is full-color throughout with nearly 100 gorgeous illustrations and photographs and with exclusive new material, character profiles, genealogical charts, maps, extensive cross-references, and much more.

My Name is Memory  by Ann Brashares

GENRE: Contemporary, Fantasy, Romance | PAGES: 336

My rating: ★★★

My Name is Memory is a book about reincarnation. I love books with this theme.

Overall, the plotline was pretty original and Daniel’s character was so complex and interesting to get to know. With each chapter of his life that interest multiplied and his search for Sophia grew ever more compelling.

If there is one downfall it would, for me, have to be the anti-climactic ending–I was left feeling as though there was a page missing… a shame really since the rest of the book was so good.

“Love demands everything, they say, but my love demands only this: that no matter what happens or how long it takes, you`ll keep faith in me, you`ll remember who we are, and you`ll never feel despair.”

My Name is Memory

 

‘You have been with me from the very first life. You are my first memory every time, the single thread in all of my lives.’

Interview with the Vampire by Anne Rice

GENRE: Fantasy, Paranormal | PAGES: 308

My rating: ★★★★

Interview with the Vampire is unlike any other vampire novel I’ve read. It is full of sumptuous detail and the language is deliciously lyrical. Anne Rice’s style of writing possesses a quality that makes you feel as though you’re in the room hearing the story first-hand.

You can fully connect with the vampire telling his story, and you can appreciate the soul-destroying side of a blood drinker’s eternal existence.

Whilst I enjoyed the second half of the book more than the first in terms of pacing, overall Interview with the Vampire is a brilliant story, and its characters are as intriguing as the vampire itself.

Looking forward to devouring all of the other books in this series.

 

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Interview with the Vampire

 

In a darkened room a young man sits telling the macabre and eerie story of his life – the story of a vampire, gifted with eternal life, cursed with an exquisite craving for human blood.

Witch Child (Witch Child, #1) by Celia Rees

GENRE: Fantasy, YA | PAGES: 240

My rating: ★★★★

I thoroughly enjoyed Witch Child for the captivating tale it told. The whole story had just enough fact amongst the fiction to make it believable as a true case. I liked that. Mary was strong and a real survivor–I cared about what happened to her from page one.

This is a memorable favourite for me and one of the best books about witches I’ve read.

 

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Witch Child

 

Enter the world of young Mary Newbury, a world where simply being different can cost a person her life. Hidden until now in the pages of her diary, Mary’s startling story begins in 1659, the year her beloved grandmother is hanged in the public square as a witch. Mary narrowly escapes a similar fate, only to face intolerance and new danger among the Puritans in the New World. How long can she hide her true identity? Will she ever find a place where her healing powers will not be feared?