The Complete Peanuts, Vol. 8: 1965-1966 by Charles M. Schulz

GENRE: Graphic Novel / Comic, Humour | PAGES: 323

My rating: ★★★★

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Peanuts, in a word, is CLASSIC. It really is.

I never tire of it. This is the first full volume I’ve read all the way through, and yet I would happily build my collection of Charles M. Schulz’s work in its entirety.

Snoopy is my personal favourite; loud, obnoxious Lucy a very close second. Honestly though, it’s impossible not to love the whole damn bunch of ’em.

Wit, irony, and Peanuts’ shining glory of presenting – amidst the comedy – real-life issues, all combine to make a world you want to visit again, and again. The stories are clever, cute, rolling-on-floor-laughing, but mostly I find them touching.

Schulz takes all of life’s little lemons, and through the miniature ‘old souls’ that form the Peanut gang, gets us chuckling-drunk on the lemonade.

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  The Complete Peanuts, Vol. 8

 

We are now in the mid-1960s, one of Schulz’s peak periods of creativity (and one third of the way through the strip’s life!). Snoopy has become the strip’s dominant personality, and this volume marks two milestones for the character: the first of many “dogfights” with the nefarious Red Baron, and the launch of his writing career (“It was a dark and stormy night…”). Two new characters—the first two from outside the strip’s regular little neighborhood—make their bows. Roy (who befriends Charlie Brown and then Linus at summer camp) won’t have a lasting impact, but upon his return from camp he regales a friend of his with tales of the strange kids he met, and she has to go check them out for herself. Her name? “Peppermint” Patty. With an introduction by filmmaker Hal Hartley.