Stolen: A Letter to My Captor by Lucy Christopher

GENRE: Dark, YA | PAGES: 304

My rating: ★★★★

This book made me question my own state of mind!

Apart from being really well written and engaging, it also left me with that rare and lingering ‘book aftermath’…

Gemma, the book’s voice, is taken – stolen – at an airport in Bangladesh by someone who looks vaguely familiar to her. She wakes up in a room of a house in the middle of the Australian desert and discovers that there is nowhere to run to.

Her captor Ty is a self-sufficient man of the land and introduces her to his ideal way of life, and also his idea of how she fits into it all.

Throughout, the book paints a vivid picture – the heat of the desert, the intensity of Ty and his many issues, the confusion of Gemma as she learns about her kidnapper and herself.

Once again, as with Forbidden and Comfort Food, I found myself having an odd reaction to the events within the story.

Whilst I obviously knew the situation was wrong, I couldn’t deny the fact that I saw their connection and willed it to deepen and develop.

Being based around the relationship and events of a kidnapper and his victim, there was always a huge amount of room for Stockholm syndrome. I kind of expected it.

But it never really came.

Even though Gemma cared for and maybe even fell a little bit in love with her kidnapper, and even though she was dependent on him for her survival (and her sanity to a certain extent) I personally don’t think she suffered from the syndrome. When she finally understands what she is feeling, it seems genuine, rather than a direct response to the kidnap situation.

Overall, my thoughts on this book are hugely positive; it was a rather gripping read and also food for thought (which is always good).

On a closing note, I should point out that if anyone suffered from Stockholm syndrome during this tale it would be me. It simply has to be me – because without a technical term to back me up I would only have the basic acknowledgement of having a serious Jones for the disturbed (but delicious) Ty.

 

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  stolen

 

It happened like this. I was stolen from an airport. Taken from everything I knew, everything I was used to. Taken to sand and heat, dirt and danger. And he expected me to love him. This is my story. A letter from nowhere. Sixteen year old Gemma is kidnapped from Bangkok airport and taken to the Australian Outback. This wild and desolate landscape becomes almost a character in the book, so vividly is it described. Ty, her captor, is no stereotype. He is young, fit and completely gorgeous. This new life in the wilderness has been years in the planning. He loves only her, wants only her. Under the hot glare of the Australian sun, cut off from the world outside, can the force of his love make Gemma love him back? The story takes the form of a letter, written by Gemma to Ty, reflecting on those strange and disturbing months in the outback. Months when the lines between love and obsession, and love and dependency, blur until they don’t exist – almost.